Tag Archives: Role-play for Kids

An Intro To The Pulp RPG Modular Framework.

Hello nerdy people!

We’re here today to tell you about a pretty big side of what Pulp RPG is all about: The Modular Framework. Now what on earth is that?

Well, it’s the central idea upon which all of the development of Pulp RPG revolves. To put it simply, The Modular Framework takes the Pulp RPG Basic Rulebook and uses it’s simple mechanics as a point from which to build more complex and setting-specific game systems, without having to include all of these rules in one giant tome.

While indeed you can just use the Basic Rulebook’s lightweight and narratively focused ruleset to run any sort of game you like, in any sort of setting you like, we feel that those more crunchy, mechanics-based systems are a lot of fun too, so we’ll be using The Modular Framework to add layers and layers of mechanical complexity to the game going forward.

The trick we’re really trying to achieve is being able to use tiers of complexity to allow you to flesh out your games in any way you want. This approach will also allow us to deliver packs of new content and mechanics as and when they are developed, so that you can slot them into your games to make the experience new and refreshing even after hundreds of hours invested into playing Pulp RPG.

Mechanics packs will be included alongside Setting packs for things like Sci-Fi combat, Spaceship Battles and Hacking in the Pulp StarFight Setting Pack being developed right now.

We think this approach will allow both us and you as players to have our cake and eat it, by being able to get your teeth into oodles of new and interesting rules and tables, while still rooting the system in simplicity.

We certainly hope you agree! But we’d love to hear any feedback you have by either commenting down below or joining our Discord server. There’s usually someone there enthusiastic to answer any questions.

Link to Discord: https://discord.gg/PGj8yYS

That’s all from us for now, but be sure to check back soon for a new update!

 

Happy gaming,
The Creator Consortium Crew.

Your Guide To Pulp RPG In The New Year

Hello there friends!

We’re here again to tell you all about the exciting things that are going to be happening with Pulp RPG in the near future. Recently we finished the first official draft of the basic rules; a lightweight roleplay system designed to allow you and your gaming group to seamlessly run games in any setting you’d like!

We’re very proud of how it turned out, and you can get your hands on the early release version by going over to our Discord server and shouting at us to hand it over!

Link to Discord: https://discord.gg/PGj8yYS

We’re also nearing completion on the first official adventure pack for Pulp: Chasing Zombie Hitler Through Panama In 1948. This madcap adventure sees you taking the role of an auspicious stranger, caught up in post-war supernatural skullduggery, facing down the most evil man in history with the powers of undeath on his side. As normal with all pulp material, it will be free to download from this website once published in the new year.

We also have many exciting projects lined up for next year! We have The Godless Realm: the first official campaign setting for Pulp RPG, set in a boundless fantasy world inhabited by deadly gods and countless monsters for you and your friends to face.

Our podcast – “Talking Pulp” – where we discuss Godless Realm

Mr. Ferris is also working on a horror themed setting: Pulp Nightmare – you’ll find yourself immersed in a terrible post-apocalyptic world where truly, the only thing to fear, is fear itself.

Then lastly we have Mr. Steadman’s pet project: Pulp StarFight – a fully fleshed-out science fiction setting brimming with political intrigue, fleet battles and weird and wonderful alien races.

Our last article on Pulp RPG – Tons of info!

There is so much more to tell, but for fear of this article getting too wordy, we’re going to leave you guessing, but rest assured we’ve got a whole host of amazing content for you coming up in 2019, so stay tuned!

Sincerely yours,

The Creator Consortium Team.

Subscribe to our mailing list to stay up to date! – http:/eepurl.com/dLtzIo

What can role-play games like Dungeons & Dragons do for you, your friends and family?

Role-playing games (RPGs) had a bit of a bad rep for a few decades – if you look at popular culture we see a nerd-collective; a mishmash of the unwanted, unwashed and friendless few sat around a dingy table in a poorly lit area rolling dice and getting ‘nerd-rage’ when things don’t go their way. It’s a pretty lame appearance and while stereotypes do exist, the reality is very different from the social perception.

Since the reawakening of games such as Dungeons & Dragons (D&D), the popularity of computer / console games and hype from books, film and other media, fantasy and its sibling science fiction, have become mainstream profiles. It’s cool to be a nerd (but better to be a real nerd).

So, what are games like Dungeons & Dragons about?

They’re a social-narrative story-telling kind of game. You create characters based on calculated abilities (actually very simple to generate) and attribute a race (Elf, Dwarf, Human, Gnome etc), class (like a life-long profession such as Rogue, Warrior, Sorcerer etc) and a personality to fit with all the above.

You may be lucky and roll a high Strength attribute, meaning you could choose a profession which is martial orientated, such as a fighter or barbarian. Or you may roll a high intelligence attribute, which could lead to the arcane path of the wizard, or a very cunning thief – there are quite a few varieties and endless customization to create a character you enjoy role-playing as.

And inevitably, you’ll get attached to them as their stories unfold.

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But how does it run, how does the game progress and how do you keep track?

The same way you would reading a novel, only in this instance the author is often referred to as the games master (GM) or dungeons master (DM) if you’re specifically playing Dungeons & Dragons.

The GM will create a story within the guidelines of a theme, usually fantasy (think sword & sorcery) or science fiction (think Star Wars). The GM acts as the story teller (although story-shower is more appropriate) and referee, describing the scenes, acting as the non-player characters (NPCs) who are both the good guys and bad guys you may encounter on the adventure.

The format of the game is usually referred to as an adventure, although different RPGs may label these as mysteries, quests or simply as stories. An adventure can last a couple of hours, or they can be linked together with an overarching story which are sometimes referred to as campaigns. A campaign can last for weeks, months, years or even decades (can confirm).

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Why are they good for you then?

This can be straight forward and quite complex at the same time. If you’re thinking of running a game with the family the benefits are obvious – your child will learn literacy skills and likely have a desire to read more about how the adventures can work. They’ll also begin to grasp the simple math behind the core mechanic of the game – which will lead them to ponder the chances or probability of dice rolls. They’ll want to know what their chances of surviving the dragons terrible fire breath are!

The slightly more complex learning will come from creativity and cooperative game play. Team work is required in games like D&D as no one will have the same advantages and disadvantages. Learning to plan out how the adventuring party will get over an alligator infested chasm will require verbal skills, game skills and the ability to compromise.

It may even allow the younger player to consider with retrospect how encounters worked or not, despite their protest at being democratically overruled by the party as a whole.

It’s good to learn to be a respected loser and a humble winner.

While we’re at it there’s also scope for more critical thinking – the game offers broader choices than you would find in digital role-play games on account of the limitless imaginations we all have. This brain stimulating critical thinking and imagination will increase a child’s capacity for reasoning and open mindedness which they will not get with other forms of games.

And finally; morality.

Every action has a consequence in just about any walk of life and RPGs. It may be cool to slay the evil orcs as they attack the human village… but what if the adventuring party then encounter the orphaned children of those orcs, starving and cold, searching for their parents?

In this day and age, morality and empathy are hard lessons to learn – best to start early.

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A smidge of science: Adams (2013) studied the effects of role-playing games and identified several human needs which are sated during regular game play; the need to belong, the need for spontaneity and the need to be moral, all within the democratic participation of a well-balanced adventuring party. Why wouldn’t you want to fulfill those needs, and what better way to learn and cope with them?

And regarding those naysayers who say RPGs are bad for you? Check out this abstract from a scientific journal. Less than a quarter of psychiatrists questioned thought RPGs are bad for your mental health. The rest were likely players of Dungeons & Dragons or did their homework. The majority are clear; there are no links between playing table top RPGs and psychopathology. It’s good for you.

Want an easier version of an RPG to try? Check out this game, it’s made by Justin Halliday who has kids and likes role-playing with them (it all looks cute too!)

And for the grownups…

Well all of the above, with practice in improvisation, humility and creativity. Some say that RPGs bring people together, connecting people with fond memories in a world that has only ever existed in their minds, but are no less real to them than the air they breathe.

This author can confirm; friends since the age of 9 still get together weekly to combine might and kick evil in the ass.

“Full plate and packing steel!” as his teenage hero used to say.

 

References

Adams, Aubrie S. (2013) “Needs Met Through Role-Playing Games: A Fantasy Theme Analysis of Dungeons & Dragons,” Kaleidoscope: A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research: Vol. 12, Article 6.

Edited 5/10/18 to help make opening sentence more inclusive.

J.D Ferris, C.C