Tag Archives: Gaming

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – Growing Pains.

I think I’m getting this game; finally. When you first start playing, everything is so overwhelming that you become so sure that it’s almost impossible to know enough to fulfill the criteria in your head that would lead you to class yourself as “competent” – it’s as unattainable in those first few weeks as flapping your arms and flying to the moon.

 

Then, when you surround yourself with good people and put the time into fitting ships and getting blown up again and again but learning, then you start to see how things fit together, how you need a fleet composed of specific ships to do specific things if you want to beat actual people. Fighting NPCs is similar, but the human is the most fierce prey, ha.

 

We have a good number of people in the corporation now, to the point where I think we’re done with the first round of recruitment: let’s see how many of our amazing people can deal with my sub-par leadership to make it to phase two! Which shall be kicking off in little more than a month.

 

The project is going a lot smoother than I expected; the whole idea was to get people playing the game, interacting and having fun without a strict corp structure and scheduling – these things will still exist for events and fleet ops etc, but I have no interest in enforcing lots of imaginary rules in an imaginary game.

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Other than that, we’re staring at our skill queue, waiting for doctrine ships to train so we can all go ratting as a fleet and rake in the monies.

 

Just a quick update for a standard week in the life of a know-nothing CEO. Until next time, fly safe.
Boboko Busanagi of EternalCosmicBeardCorp.

Tabletop War-Game Terrain & Scenery Part Three: Putting it all Together

In the last few weeks I’ve gone over some of the techniques for making battlefield terrain. The focus has been on buildings and structures and this week we’re going to finish that theme off by bringing it all together. I promised some multistory buildings too. Read on to see more of the good stuff and how I achieved the beginnings of some great results!

What am I doing?

I decided to make everything so that it would fit on convenient 15 x 15 cm tiles. This was so that I could orientate the same tiles to create different looking terrain, whether I’m playing Age of Sigmar, AoS Skirmish, Frostgrave or even some Dungeons & Dragons.

Similar tiles can be used to create urban scenery in Warhammer 40,000, which I’ll cover at some point in the future.

wargame wargames terrain building modelling warhammer 40K age of sigmar AOS miniatures frostgrave

I also upgraded my hot-wire cutter. It was a little more expensive, in the £50-60 region, but the arm doesn’t flex, the wire doesn’t bend and it heats up consistently making its ability to cut through foam much better! Alarmingly, the wire does glow bright orange, which was a little disconcerting at first!

So how did I do, what did I do, and how did I do it? Read on…

A trial run…

I decided to test my formula for creating tabletop scenery with an unsuspecting volunteer. I quickly ran down the basic steps of creating the terrain piece, introduced the volunteer to a hot glue gun and Styrofoam, hefted a tonne of miniature bricks onto the table and allowed that person to run away with their imagination. This is the outcome so far (note, it still needs painting).

 

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As you can see, it really doesn’t take much to get stuck in and have a go. Once again, there wasn’t a huge amount of planning involved in the creation of this quaint little tower – imagination provided the blueprints and away they went!

The Tile Set Blueprints

OK, so creating as many 15 x 15 cm tiles as required. To make my life easier, I got hold of some 1 cm thick black Styrofoam. It was an eBay purchase and cost me about £16 but may be cheaper in other parts of the world. Why did I buy these? It’s quite difficult to thin down thick Styrofoam on account of the wobbly nature of the hot-wire cutter.

So, not everything needs be to broken or derelict, no, there needs to be more so I’m going to build some complete structures which fit on the 15 cm tiles; watchtowers, tall walls, dead-ends, bell towers, warehouses, pig pens, shambolic defensive positions – you name it!

Because each tile is essentially 6 x 6 inches, I can fit four in a single square foot. Multiply this by four and you’ve got yourself an interchangeable, customisable and modular tabletop terrain system. I’ll go to town on some bigger open plazas with ruined columns etc in the future (to make it easier and give any missile troops a chance).

Footpaths & Plazas

From a design point of view, I’d like to build some footpaths, essentially narrow death traps that must be risked to get to different places on the map.  Here are some images of the test pieces I worked on. It can take time to get it right, so give yourself an open mind when you’re trying out ideas – you won’t put pressure on yourself and get worked up by perceived ‘failures’ at the end of your crafting session.

 

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The dirt footpaths are 5 x 15 cm. By applying a lot of pressure with some scrunched up tin foil to the centre of the Styrofoam piece, and lighter touches to the outer quarters I was able to create the impression that the path had been used for many years. I cut some 0.5 x 0.5 x 15 slithers of foam and cut them up, weathering and aging them with the foil to look like curb pieces.

In the future when I attempt larger roads, I will use the ‘crazy pathing’ idea and simply trim the pieces down to compensate for the curb. I’ll also impress the foam in places to make it look like carts had been through, wearing down the road over the years.

The roads should be at least 10 cm wide and up to 30 cm long (the extent of my purchased Styrofoam sheets) – they will look good running through the centre of the board, or alongside the boards on bigger battle arenas. Details are important here, so I need to think about how I’m going to decorate the pieces to make them believable.

It sounds easy, but it’s actually very hard to make simple open spaces and retain the feeling of interest and wonder. Because there’s likely no focal point to grab the eye, it needs to have a few extra details to keep the area ‘alive’ and quirky.

I’ve decided on a single gallows with some stakes rammed into the ground to keep people away from ‘justice’ being served…

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I added some ‘crazy pathing’ for a bit more variety, weathering the whole lot with the tin foil method. To make the pathing stones I cut foam strips 2 x 2 cm then went over the corners, freehand cutting in irregular ways. I then cut the stones from the end of the strips at 0.5 cm, creating odd and mismatched but flat stones. In hindsight, I should have cut these narrow than 0.5 cm, maybe half that again to 0.25 cm.

Texture is also important, so I’ll likely be using some of the rolling pins from Green Stuff World. An example of my trial run with these can be found in the images below…

 

 

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Ramping It Up!

Finally, I decided to have a go at the multistory building idea.

I wanted to make this bigger, but I also wanted to be able to use different parts of it at different times. To achieve this, I started with 4 tiles to make a jumbo tile and began building a wall which would interconnect. I added a ruined wall around the edges of the jumbo tile, leaving plenty of gaps and debris for cover and interesting features.

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I then started to make a second story of brickwork, which I could lock or lay in place and built this up a few times. Finally, I made a third story set of brickwork, but this time to accommodate half a roof.

The roof in these pieces was made from foam board, which is light and tough. I cut out rows of packing card (the sort of thin card your Amazon books are delivered in). Each row was 2 cm high with a cut  1 cm deep every 1 cm along the row. I then just cut and hacked out pieces to create the impression of roof slates. This was time consuming, but quite rewarding. You can see some of the details in the image below.

wargame wargames terrain building modelling warhammer 40K age of sigmar AOS miniatures frostgrave

Finally, here’s a series of images showing you how to connect together.

 

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OK, so its not complete yet (I mean, I did just complete an entire week of a UK LARP event!) So I’ll post some images next week.

That’s it for now, and the end of this miniseries for terrain and scenery. If you’ve learnt anything, or if you have some advice and tips of your own, please leave a message in the comments below.

There will be more on tabletop terrain in the future, but for now, I really want to get these pieces finished and have them lined up for some gaming!

Good luck, and have fun!

Ferris

Part One…

Part Two…

Twitter @FerrisWrites or @TheCConsortium

Facebook page!

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – We Moved To A Wormhole.

Last week feels like a world away compared to where I am now with Eve. It’s safe to say that I’ve learned more than I ever have in this game during that time.

So, the previous article was published when our corporation had two members exploring relic sites in null sec. Eight days after that article went live, we now have around ten people and now own a base in a wormhole system.

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Here’s the story; me and Lane Davaham – my second in command – talked about wanting to move into wormhole space to try and make some money or learn how to play this mysterious game by dying until we didn’t die anymore. I wanted to make my own Corp because I like being able to decide what is fun for me and what I want to do, with the hope being that I can assemble a cadre of like minded individuals and we can move forward together.

The corp was almost a joke, and designed with humour in mind; this place is lighthearted and laid back in the extreme and I wanted that to be our guiding focus.

I also received a ton of advice from experienced people who had run corps before, all of their advice amounted to “Don’t do this, you will fail.” Which is fine, and frankly expected. Failure is always an option during projects like these, but i find that if you’re honest about your expectations and your abilities then things tend to work out.

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Then another person got in touch and offered to sell us a base in wormhole space for a relatively cheap price. We jumped on the offer and within two days we had control transferred over and both of us were sitting inside our own base just wondering how we got here.

Since then, we have begun to build a solid core of experienced players who constantly surprise me with their patience while I ask a million questions and try to learn everything I need to, to be able to give this place a chance to succeed.

We’re currently hauling ships into our system to hand over to new players when they join and hopefully give them some guidance on how to fit and fly their ships so anyone who is new can at least go out there and feel like they are playing the game correctly.

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Going forward we will be trying to make some isk (I have been told staying profitable in wormhole space is near impossible) and have some fun. Many fleets will be formed in the coming days in pursuit of explosions; be they ours or our enemies!

In short; Eve Online hasn’t beaten me yet, in fact at the moment we’re going from strength to strength with the aid of some incredibly helpful and generous people; not just with their isk, but also their patience and capacity to withstand the barrage of ignorance and questions leveled at them from their know-nothing CEO.

EternalCosmicBeardCorp is currently recruiting! Our mission statement is evolving as we evolve, and I suppose that’s the message I need to get across: it’s going to be a long road, but we’ve taken our first steps and have not yet fallen on our face – we want to keep this game fun, for new and experienced players alike, and I honestly believe it’s the people involved that will make that happen. So come along and have a chat, you’ll be welcome.

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We’re determined to stay laid back, determined to have fun and determined to fail and learn. The ECBC way.

Our public channel in Eve: EternalBeardChat

Our discord: https://discord.gg/nzsBfuW

Link to last week’s article: https://creatorconsortium.com/2019/04/27/eve-online-will-not-beat-me-i-lost-200-million-isk-this-week/

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – I Lost 200 Million Isk This Week.

I lost 200 million isk this week. That might sound a lot – to some it’s truly just a drop in the bucket; to me it’s a big chunk of change, but the lessons I learned while losing it were incredibly valuable. Let’s talk about happier things first.

 

We’ve had a couple of people join the corp! Which is awesome. We’re working out the kinks and trying to really figure out what we want to do. Lane Davaham; our chief navigator convinced me to go exploring in wormhole space, which opened my eyes to a whole new side of Eve.

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game

You can make a lot of money in wormholes, just scanning down anomalies and doing relic sites, which is all my PvP hybrid astero is equipped for. i think I started to average around 40 million per hour, which, with more time spent skilling up, will increase steadily.

 

The plan is to start killing NPC ships in combat or sleeper sites and salvaging all their goodies. To do this, I need to buy a far more expensive ship. To understand why I am nervous about that, I need to confess my acts of stupidity for the week.

 

We came across a relic site in a C3 wormhole that had 3 cruisers and 3 frigate NPCs in it. I, not knowing the first thing about combat in Eve, said to my corpmate “I can take them”. I was wrong. I was really testing whether I could lure each ship away one by one, which might give me a fighting chance, but not understanding effective distances in the game proved my undoing as they all immediately pounced on me, killed my velocity and my ability to warp, then exploded me in under a minute.

 

You’d think I’d learn, right? Well, a few days later I’m hauling 40 million worth of relic loot and think “just one more site”. Sure enough, NPC sleepers are present, but there’s one relic box quite far away from the mass of enemies. My plan is to approach the box, align away from the enemies and gun it while deactivating my cloak to see if they could target me at that distance.

 

What actually happened is that I got too close to the box, it decloaked me before I was ready and they exploded me in under a minute. Oh well.

 

Now I’m thinking of either just knuckling under and making my money back while training into better and better ships, or taking the plunge on a Stratios (Cloaky cruiser which is more versatile, tanky and pew pew, but slower) or just buy one now and see how It works out with a fit I can use with the skills I have.

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game

I know it’s going to explode. I just hope the increased price (almost 300 mil after fitting it) will make me more cautious and i’m able to fight some sleepers in C2 wormholes to support my exploring corpmates.

 

EternalCosmicBeardCorp is currently recruiting. Our focus is to make Eve fun and to introduce new players to activities that make them feel part of the game and part of something new and exciting. We’re all learning this thing together, whether old or new. There will be many challenges along the way, but this is a wonderful game that presents so many opportunities for meaningful experiences.

 

No drama. No pettiness. Going forward with a will to accept failure and to learn; with fun as our goal.

 

That is our motto, and the Beardly way.

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game beard corp corporation

Discord link for ECBC: https://discord.gg/nzsBfuW

 

Fly save ya dinguses. O7

ECBC Logo by @smidgedraws on instagram.

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me.

I’ve been an Eve Online player for over ten years. I’ve had two separate accounts on two separate occasions. I’ve been part of corporations with thousands of members and participated in fleet battles where space station-sized ships owned by players have warped in while I goggled in surprise and wonder. I’ve plumbed the depths of player owned space on my own, under the noses of others in better equipped ships with far more skill at the game; hunting for secret relics and hidden caches of valuable items, all while frantically looking over my shoulder for player hunters and occasionally running for my life when they found me.

eve online space station new player

There’s a lot to do in Eve and I’ve done a lot of it, but I can honestly say that I have never understood the game.

 

It’s such a strange experience because it’s such a vast experience. The game is played with everyone all being on the same server. The mostly player-run economy means that you can make a living doing anything you want: mining, salvaging, battling, exploring, war with other players and much more. You undock from a station and every time you are confronted by everything and it’s so intimidating, even for a gamer like me who has spent hundreds of hours grappling with Dwarf Fortress.

 

The menus in Eve are complicated, the combat, the movement, the player interaction; everything presents you with numbers and ratios and systems with nested subsystems and to be competitive you absolutely need to atleast understand them.

eve online mining new

 

This is what keeps bringing me back and also what keeps me away. There are no amount of tutorials that can prepare you for what awaits as the game eventually spits you out and says “go and do stuff”. It’s a profoundly baffling experience if you’re on your own.

 

Ofcourse, guides tell you again and again to join a player group, or “Corp” and yes, it’s true that this is by far the best approach to learning the game if you are confident enough. But if you’re not, or you feel like your schedule won’t match up with others, or any number of reasons why you might not want to join a player group while you’re still learning the game, then Eve won’t hold your hand. You’ll need to read and read a lot.

 

But for all that, you can’t ever get away from the fact that you’re playing a true space sim, set in a living and breathing universe where real humans go about their tasks with goals and ambitions. There are pirates and danger around every corner. Real intrigue between real people who head huge organisations who run regular missions with real goals. What other game ever made can boast that level of persistence and completeness? The immersion is both minimal, as you tab out or grab your phone every five minutes to check up a rule, or stat, and simultaneously tremendous as you desperately try and lose a pirate who wants nothing more than to kill you and take your stuff.

eve online pirate hunter new player how

The game is about control and Eve puts everything and the kitchen sink into your hands and says “tell me what you’re going to do with it”. Even playing the game is a challenge that you must overcome, and who every player also logged in either has or is still in the process of overcoming. What a unique thing to be a part of.

 

So take your WoWs, your Guild Wars, your Fortnites. I need Eve. In the articles that will follow, I shall hopefully bring you all the trials and tribulations of a Newbro trying to make it in a big universe.

 

To be continued,
Boboko Busanagi, CEO of EternalCosmicBeardCorp. (We’re new, and recruiting!)

Groove of War 01 – Tournament Writeup.

 

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The minute wargroove released, the community surrounding it sprang up from a quiet fanbase that had watched and participated it in its development for the past two years. Competition is in the game’s DNA, so it was inevitable that a group of amazing players and fans of the game would put together a tournament showcasing the potential for testing the skill of it’s players.

This is where Groove of War came in, the first and most prominent tournament. Players flocked to sign up and within days, 72 players were locked in to make a small bit of history by participating in its inaugural event and what we’re sure will be a long and exciting tournament season.

The group stages were steadily played out over the week, with participants meeting up as and when to complete their games in a fairly adjudicated manner by tournament organisers. It was here where the real meat of the work began; figuring out the perfect format to provide engaging and watchable games. One massive advantage in a turn-based game like Wargroove is that there is no latency to worry about, so players never have to fret about losing to technical limitations.

Many lessons were learned in the matches preceding the finals in regards to commander balancing, map balancing and turn times. It was found out that stalemates can cause the games to drag out somewhat without timers, so a large discussion is still ongoing to determine the best solution to bring these times down to a more viewer and competitor-friendly format, also the commanders Nuru and Tenri were soon banned from future games having been deemed overpowered.

The grand final was decided between Ash (Ash_IRE on twitch) and Red-Halo, who fought all the way through their brackets to reach the top spots over the week; no small feat considering the wealth of experience from a number of competitive Advance Wars players participating.

Game one: the map was Ban Ban Beach and Ash took an early lead with a heavy Trebuchet focused build; gaining naval superiority early on and pushing right down the coast to stamp out any hope of Red rallying and threatening the seas again. They continued to slog it out in the field, but the game was over by turn 11 when Red Halo conceded, just as he was falling behind in economy.

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Game two: the map was Rumbling Range and Red Halo clawed one back here with an early confrontation down in the bottom right hand corner. It’s a larger map, so the wagons were out in full force, causing Ash to go for major blocking plays to try and deny Red Halo an air factory, but it was all for naught as Ash had clearly overplayed his hand, seeing Red march a lumbering column of pikemen down the right side of the map, successfully blocking Ash’s commander in. Ash valiantly fought on, but conceded on turn 12 when Red’s dragon bore down.

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Game three: We returned to Ban Ban Beach which saw both players try to gain naval superiority early; Red had clearly learned from the last game and held his own in the seas til the end. An early rush into the middle island gained Ash a crucial economic advantage, Red had split his forces and it took him a few turns to gain footing on the important choke point, while Ash built up his core in the centre. The game seemed very close until Red conceded on turn 8, which left both myself and his opponent in surprise. It could have turned on a penny, but with that win, Ash took the set and was crowned Champion.

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It is truly exciting to follow the organisers and now veterans of the game’s competitive scene as they forge a new standard for how this game will be played into the future. Wargroove is an amazingly fun game; this event just shows how games like this can bring people together. This first tournament, while suffering its share of teething pains, was an important first step and an exciting look into what a determined group of people with a love for strategy gaming can do.

Congrats to Ash, on winning!

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Link to tournament hub:

https://smash.gg/tournament/groove-of-war-01/details

Link to Ash’s Twitch:

https://twitch.tv/ash_ire

Finals VOD:

WarGroove: The Best Game of 2019 Comes Early.

I know what you are thinking: the title of this article is hyperbole of the most unforgivable kind. Just do me a favour and give me a chance to explain.

Wargroove is the latest game developed and published by Chucklefish: the now legendary publisher of the smash hit farm-em-up Stardew Valley and sci fi side scroller, Starbound. The London based publishing and development house have been consistently chucking out winners since the start of the indie revolution, beginning their meteoric rise with Risk Of Rain: a devilishly difficult roguelike.

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The things their games seem to have in common are a focus on brilliant, stripped down mechanics and a high quality pixel art style, both of which suit me down to the ground.

I spotted Wargroove on one of my frequent and mindless trawls through the steam store. The art style immediately caught my eye and I felt utter joy in my heart as I saw an armoured dog leading an army into battle on a 2D battlefield. I was hooked even before I bought it. This feeling only intensified as I was greeted by an anime-like intro cutscene which I just sat and watched. In recent years, Blizzard has been lauded for their amazing cutscenes, and rightly so, but it is nice to see a smaller developer going for the same sort of thing.

The game brings many franchises to mind: Advance Wars, Fire Emblem, The Battle For Wesnoth. These three are stalwarts in the turn-based strategy genre and in a sense Wargroove actually is all these amazing titles that reached their zenith years ago. It is a kind of rebirth of turn based tactics games, embodying the things that made them great; like smaller maps, tighter mechanics and the ability for players to make maps and customise everything, then they repackaged it into something fresh and beautiful, clearly created by people who know and love the genre.

The gameplay is simple: you take control of one of 12 heroes, 3 for each of the four distinct factions and vie for control of a tactical map broken up into squares. There are a profusion of unit types; from lowly foot soldiers to trebuchets, ships and dragons, all which add tools to your toolbox when trying to outfox your enemy. The interesting thing to note is that each faction, while aesthetically unique, can only produce the same units.

This means that the game is easier to balance, with the only asymmetry being with the leader you choose, which puts it in good stead for the Esports scene which has energetically sprung up around the game. From what I have played, the “quick play” option in online multiplayer indeed returns a game quickly, which is fantastic. You can also set up your own game with a whole host of different options to face off against your opponent. I can only hope the devs follow this ease of use up with more features to support competitive play.

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The campaign is fully formed and engaging: you follow Mercia, queen of Cherrystone, who is thrust into the driving seat after her father is assassinated by the undead Felheim faction. It plays much like the older games mentioned above: sections of dialogue interspersed with thematic battles which introduce weird and wonderful mechanics to keep you on your toes. The game also provides “puzzle” and “arcade” modes that will significantly aid replayability. There is plenty of humour in the campaign, alongside the broader themes of adventure and war. It’s safe to say Wargroove doesn’t take itself too seriously.

To me, this game is like chess but better. You take your playing pieces and are able to dynamically fight and counter your opponents strategies as you build units and try to out compete the opponent financially by capturing towns. The amazing “crit” system ensures the need for deep thought when positioning your troops, as they only reach their full potential when meeting criteria specific to each unit. I have found myself staring over a defensive line at my opponent, waiting for one of us to blink, only to find myself outmaneuvered somewhere else and forced to flee. You feel the tactics and back and forth of a good wargame just oozing out of this title.

Overworld-Map

This game makes me feel like I am at the start of something new and interesting. This is a feeling we gamers crave; back in 2015, Rocket League hit the market and started a sports-game revolution all of its own. The reason it was able to do this is because it firmly placed itself into that genre, but did the same things as other sports games (use of physics, a ball with goals and a global game timer) repackaged into something new and fresh, the process by which those older, tried and tested elements, could create something satisfying and new. As of the writing of this article, the highest prize pool for a Rocket League tournament was over 1 million dollars.

Wargroove, I feel, is doing the same thing to turn based strategy games. There is a huge demographic of gamers who are starved for this type of game and feel the urge to watch talented people play it against each other; to follow their favourite player and hopefully start that journey themselves. The strategy gamer in on the comeback.

This game delivers on so many levels but it is important to discuss its drawbacks. Chiefly that most people will really be put off by how slow the game can feel when you are in the thick of the action. Every game requires you to really think about how you set up your forces and is almost a cold war where each person is trying to push and maneuver to find an edge. In fact, once the fighting begins, you often know what the result is going to be only a few turns afterwards. To me, this is ideal, and speaks to a wargame that works, but for others it might ring dull.

Winter-Map

In conclusion, I do not think it is too soon to tell that this beautiful little game is going to make waves in the realm of strategy well into 2019 and I cannot wait to play in my first tournament.

Wargroove is out now on Windows, PS4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch. It is priced at around 15-20 dollars.

P.S. Wagons Are Bad – Brought to you by the Anti Wagon League.