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The 9th Age Part 2: A World of Story, A World of War

We kick off part two of our 9th Age review just after the release of the “legendary” version of the “Warriors of the Dark Gods” faction and by the gods, it’s packed full of cool stuff. This is great timing as we’re going to be looking at the background, theme and lore of the 9th Age (you can find part one, here).

In this Article

  • We shall briefly look at the world composition and history of the 9th Age,
  • Introduce some of the darker themes,
  • Take a look at a couple of the factions, comparing them to similar factions from Games Workshop’s old Warhammer Fantasy Battles,
  • Finally, we’ll look into the new Warriors of the Dark Gods faction book to see just what the 9th Age team are capable of.

The Written Lore

Before I begin, it’s worth mentioning the writing style of the lore and setting of the 9th Age. Rather than being a single monotonous view point, the style instead portrays the world through personal accounts, letters and journals, detailing the wonders and horrors of the 9th Age. Some of the characters are recurring throughout the texts providing successive layers to their often woeful stories. This style of writing was common during the early decades of the last century but dropped out of favour with the advancement of film and TV.

Pick up any fictional book from that early era and you’ll see what I mean: H.P Lovecraft (Cthulhu mythos), H.G Wells (War of the Worlds), Mary Shelly (Frankenstein / The Modern Prometheus), all use this style of writing. It’s effective because it puts the reader next to the author and immediately draws our attention. The reader knows from the outset that the account is first hand, likely to be believable. In my opinion, a well executed literary move by the 9th Age writers.

The World of the 9th Age

Dark & Gritty? We shall see. What I think stands out from the history is the poetic style. The 9th Age history is presented to us in several verses, similar to something we would find in a bible or viking saga. They call it the “World Hymn,” found on a tapestry thought to be ancient in years, perhaps a copy of a similar, older Dwarven text. The Hymn details the previous ages in allegory, of how the ancient lizards races once ruled the world, and how a comet gave the first sign to rebel and break free.

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

Perhaps because it is still early days the world seems to be breathing and growing slowly. The groundwork seems to be there and we’re likely to see more content as each faction receives its legendary faction book. We must remember that the 9th Age is designed with tournaments in mind but with all the effort into creating such a beautiful world, are we asking too much to hope that there will at some point be a narrative story arc? Maybe we might one day see the “Storm of Father Chaos” as a campaign?

Indeed in the executive board mission statement it is made very clear that they believe the background is critical for players to access and fully enjoy the 9th Age. They’ve given the Background Team powers to oversee the story development, so expect to see full on Legendary versions for each faction over the coming years… and if they’re anything like Warriors of the Dark Gods, we’re all in for a great deal (free, totally free!)

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

Perusing one of the 9th Age forums recently suggested by Ghiznuk (a member of the Translation Team Russian), I gained an insight into the world setting development. In it, Ghiznuk explains how the world map is designed and how it must permit different factions to have a reliable narrative reasoning for encountering one another. It’s such a simple idea but one that never seemed to be fully realised in Warhammer Fantasy Battles.An example: the Highborn Elves were once part of a huge empire which has since crumbled, leaving countless outposts in the form of harbors and ports scattered across the world. These elves are a mighty naval force and thus have strong trading routes, allowing factions to encounter them.

An example: the Highborn Elves were once part of a huge empire which has since crumbled, leaving countless outposts in the form of harbors and ports scattered across the world. These elves are a mighty naval force and thus have strong trading routes, allowing factions to encounter them.

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

I think it is fair to say that in their mission to gather and develop more players, the 9th Age teams are performing a herculean effort to produce something of quality – the fact that this is essentially volunteer work towards something created by and for the community makes it more remarkable. If the last two paragraphs haven’t given you enough to believe in it, I guess you’ll just have to read on…

Killing for Fun, or with Purpose

It came to my attention on one of many frequented sub-reddits that a few people are put off by the fact that the 9th Age was, as they understood it, designed purely for tournament players. I can see where this misconception came from. One redditor went as far as to say that they wished the game had some sort of scenarios to make the game-play more engaging, much like Age of Sigmar does now (you pretty much HAVE to play Age of Sigmar as a scenario). It did not take me long to find what I was looking for…

The 9th Age Scenario Supplement!

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

With a book of 18 scenarios, there’s plenty of scope to create a series of skirmishes or mammoth battles with a purpose beyond simple annihilation. Each game can be randomly generated with some dice rolls, or picked from a list to create narrative campaigns. Problem solved!

A Note on Equal Representation

Reading all the different snippets of background out there, we get the impression that female characters are more represented than in Games Workshop, even by their current standards. There’s little reason that GW can’t rectify this quickly, but it seems to be going at a slow pace for them currently. Not so for the 9th Age! This is great, and I’m certain the inclusivity will encourage players of all identities.

Moving onward, I think it is time we had a spotlight review on some of the factions. I chose these two factions because they are my favourite themes; noble elves and efficient troops of the empire!

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

Factions Spotlight

I should point out that the background lore for most of the factions is pretty slim at the moment. The exceptions to this are Demon Legions, Sylvan Elves, Undying Dynasties and the newly released Warriors of the Dark Gods (which I’ll take a deeper look at later). For the time being, most of the background is contained within snippets of accounts and journals scattered throughout the 9th Age website or contained within the above mentioned faction books. There is an effort to get everything into one easy to access source, fully translated, but community driven projects on this scale can take time. As mentioned previously, there is a concerted push to achieve this grand goal!

Still, even with these little taster pieces, the nature of the different factions should be familiar to those who possessed an interest in the Warhammer Fantasy brand. Even if you’ve never played the tabletop war-game, some of you will be familiar through digital or role-playing games such as the Total War series or Warhammer Fantasy Role-playing Game (recently published again by Cubicle 7).

I’ll admit that my Warhammer lore is a little rusty, but if you get a chance, leave a comment after reading this and let me know if you’re getting a similar feeling with any of the factions currently in the 9th Age!

Highborn Elves

Look and Feel

The Highborn Elves are similar to the middle-era of Warhammer Fantasy Battles. In a nutshell they are:

  • A civilisation in retreat,
  • A nation of naval traditions with settlements all over the world,
  • Highly trained troops who are quick to strike,
  • Heavily armoured or mixed lightly armoured
  • An adaptable force, with giant dragons, powerful or swift cavalry & multipurpose infantry,
  • Brimming with high magical potential
  • Disciplined troops, less likely to behave poorly and let you down!

History

There are a tonne of similarities with the Elves of the Warhammer world and the 9th Age, which is pleasing to see because there’s such a rich and noble history involved. From the snippets of information we have we can glean that the Highborn are in retreat, very Tolkien-esque. We are told that they’re divided into three hence the factions symbol of 3 spheres, each representing an elemental theme such as wind, waves and fire.

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

For ease, I’ve copied the brief history snippets for you to read here.

“The white isles of Celeda Ablan, home of the Highborn Elves, are said to be a truly awe inspiring sight. They are guarded by fleets of the finest ships to set sail, and phalanxes of Elves blessed with the natural grace and skill of their people. Led by Princes borne aloft on terrifying dragons, the Highborn have ever maintained a proud and aloof manner, yet they are capable of fighting with the same savagery their cousins display.”

“Although they have the greatest naval power the world has seen, the Highborn Elves have retreated from many of their former conquests. Despite this, they continue to hold outposts on coastlines across the globe. The fall of the Highborn’s appointed Raj, ruling over the Sagarika Kingdoms in their name, marked the extent of their decline. Yet even with increasing resources diverted to combat the Dread Elf threat, they still dominate the seas and the resulting trade.”

“In the mists of time, they rebelled against the enigmatic Saurians to become guardians of much of the world, while the ancestors of the Dwarves held the rest. Once they were a single race, yet their united rule could not endure. Even these most graceful of beings are not immune to in-fighting or betrayal. The details are veiled in allegory and myth, but it is clear a great schism rent the Elven peoples asunder, resulting in the three powers we see today.”

Note that these small parcels of information hint or mention other factions, such as their cousins, the Dread Elves and the human Sagarika Kingdoms (which we learn in other sources was sponsored by the Elves to help overthrow the rule of the Ogre Khans!)

Game Abilities

Martial discipline is a key faction ability which gives the elves some staying power. What they lack in physical resistance they make up with strong training. This ability allows the player to roll two dice instead of one, and choose the lowest (best) score for tests of leadership.

Unlike most elves in fantasy worlds, there doesn’t seem to be a huge physical weakness to them. The Resilience characteristic determines how “easily the model withstands blows” much like the toughness characteristic in Warhammer Fantasy. Compared to humans troops, Highborn troops are just as resilient however, their commanders are weaker, retaining a resilience of 3 compared to 4 for humans.

Their agility is great – in the 9th Age models with a higher agility score attack first. What I loved about the High Elves from Warhammer Fantasy was their speed but I didn’t agree with the “always strike first” rule as it seemed too forced. In 9th Age elves are fast not because of a rule, but because of their profile: a typical Highborn elf has an agility score of 5 compared to a normal human warrior who has a score of 3, making elves super agile.

I punched a simple army into BattleScribe and assuming it’s up-to-date, I was amazed that Citizen Spears (a regular unit of spear-men for the Highborn Elves faction) were even more agile in certain circumstances.

I’ll explain…

In the 9th Age, weapons all possess special rules. For spears this means they provide fighting in extra ranks (which Citizen Spears do already, so there’s plenty of attacks there), they provide a bonus to penetrating their targets armour (+1) and assuming they unit did not charge, are engaged and not flanked, grant a further bonus to agility and armour penetration. This amounts to an agility of 7, armour penetration of +2 and if they’re fighting in 3 ranks of 5, you’re looking at 15 attacks – sounds like a very effective greek-styled phalanx.

It seems that simple (basic) units are capable troops and are not just there to provide filler units to your armies. I got excited when I played around with the BattleScribe app and so purchased some Oathmark Elves – you get 30 miniatures in a box for around £25, so £50 essentially gets you 3 units of mixed spears, bows or hand weapons (I’ll review them another time).

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

Empire of Sonnstahl

Look and Feel

The Empire of Sonnstahl echoes the Empire from the old Warhammer world, as you would expect. It is:

  • Blocks of trained state troops,
  • Gothic knights riding heavily armoured horses,
  • Battle mages and War Priests,
  • Cannons and siege engines galore,
  • Works best when units are used together as a whole.

History

Replace the bearded Sigmar with Sunna, a female goddess who united the human tribes, and you’ve pretty much got the gist of the Sonnstahl Empire (Sonnstahl, as we learn below, is the name of Sunnas sword).

Throughout the snippets we get the idea that the Sonnstahl Empire, while lacking the extensive age and focus of the elder races, makes up its shortfalls in dedication and record keeping. It really is an interesting and refreshing idea that humans are able to record and pass down their learnings so that each successive generation is better prepared and able to learn more. It really gives the human faction a great feel.

“A nation founded upon the exploits of Sunna, goddess given flesh, our ally has developed far from its early days. The tribes Sunna unified have endured together, never forgetting her memory and glory, symbolised by her eponymous sword Sonnstahl. The core of human supremacy in Vetia, with Destrian wealth now united through marriage with its grand armies and economy, there is no limit to the Empire’s ambition.”

“But, to command such a diverse nation, an Emperor must not simply conquer in battle, he or she must compete in the political arena, navigating the treacherous currents of rival families and churches, to unite the nation against its enemies. A true seat of learning, with magic and technology refined into effective weapons, the Empire has become a master of many trades and has begun extending its grasp to foreign lands.”

Game Abilities

The Empire has a great feeling of tradition to it. Much like in Warhammer, the main human faction is designed with cooperation in mind. What individuals lack in raw brute strength, they make up in battlefield tactics and cunning.

Detachments allow for support units to respond on behalf of their parents units, meaning they can counter charge, shoot or support those units in trouble. This low-level mastery gives the Empire faction a strong sense of unity and training which marries well with the “state troop” feel it possesses. Lines of missile troops supporting blocks of eavy infantry has nice historical feel to it, which will appeal to history buffs, while allowing the fantasy element to smooth over a need for absolute accuracy.

Generals and Commanders of the Empire can also issue “Orders” once per turn. These play into the feel of the troops, as orders allow units to move faster, embolden them against losses or near defeat, make shooting units more accurate or brace a unit against an incoming charge. Multiple characters who can give orders stack up so long as the order isn’t the same, so in theory a stout line of missile troops and spears troops could effectively gain the accurate rule and fight in extra ranks which feels nice thematically.

An example of the above is a simple army list created with BattleScribe:

1 Commander, with bits and pieces.

15 Imperials Guard with greatswords (think, WFB “Greatswords”) as a parent unit, with a magical banner, the “Banner of Unity.”

2 units of 10 handgunners, both as support units.

This combination means that if the Commander issues an order to the Imperial Guard unit, the banner allows a further free order to be given to a support unit, effectively providing a chain of command across the units. They make ideal rank and file strategies when you start to add in extra commanders capable of giving orders.

Dark Lore – the Lore of Badass

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

So, the bit that’s really caught my attention and imagination this week: Warriors of the Dark Gods!

Warriors of the Dark Gods

This faction book is packed. I mean, seriously stuffed with stories and lore generating the background of the world effortlessly. It is a piece of art in its own right, with writers and artists packing in their hard work to create something that exceeds the stuff we see written by the likes of Games Workshop. I’ve said it before in previous articles, but for a group of people working for nothing, this is exceptional. It feels more like Warhammer Fantasy Battles than Warhammer Fantasy Battles! If this is what we’re to expect for all of the factions in the 9th Age, then we are to be truly blessed with something amazing.

Even the artwork is superb, but for me, the art looks REAL. It hasn’t just been banged out by a Wacom tablet and stylus, no, these artists have spent a great deal of time on their art and it really shows! (I have nothing against digital artists, I just expect more from the likes of GW who are funded by their sales!)

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

We are treated with 80 pages of storytelling, lore and fantastic artwork before we even get to the game mechanics section, of which there are nearly 30 pages of army choices and stat lines, completed with a quick reference guide to make consulting your stats easy. And don’t forget, you can simply download the “slim” version of the army book, which contains only the game mechanic components.

At the beginning of the book we are given a story of the trials of commander Ilarion Yanovich, whose frontier town becomes surrounded by raiders. Yanovich is visited each night by one of seven envoys from each camp, enticing him to their dark gods. In this story, we are given insights into the dark gods and how their warriors behave. The temptations and trials are reminiscent of Dante’s Inferno, with each envoy representing what we would call a sin. Yanovich appears throughout the stories, each snippet exploring the newer peaks of his plight.

The artwork here is amazing: tall, robust warrior figures in heavy plated armour representing each of the envoys. Take a look at the images below (courtesy of the 9th Age book). I can certainly feel the nostalgia rising in the artwork. Some examples carry a 90’s style I’ve missed so much, emulated so well that they could have passed the high standard of golden age of Games Workshop and the White Dwarf magazine. It is probably unfair to keep comparing the 9th Age with a well established setting, but the creative talents behind the 9th Age have managed to not just copy the art, but perfect it further.

9th Age tabletop wargame fantasy warhammer battles gamesworkshop

Moving on: as we read further we get an idea of how the world was made, of the Mother & Father who make up the twin worlds and of the veil, a hair’s breadth barrier between the two worlds. Mother is law and Father Chaos is the opposite. We’ve learned now that there are seven dark gods, but also an extra layer to the hierarchy, with Father Chaos acting as the Overlord.

The story of Anaba by a mysterious sorcerer further defines the pantheon, describing the symbol of the dark gods, an eight-pointed star. The longest point of the star symbolising Father Chaos. In the lore, it is said that Father’s plans underpin the plans of the seven. We also learn that those dark gods fashioned themselves on the sins of mortals.

The richness of this cosmic lore could go on and on, but I can’t stress enough how much you will learn about the 9th Age from this.

I could go on, but this article is already over 3K words and it is late in the night!

Join us for the next part, where we will undertake to create some armies of the 9th Age and battle it out over several scenarios to get an actual feel for the game. We will cover:

  • Choosing and creating our armed forces,
  • Create a narrative mini-campaign using the scenarios supplement,
  • A brief overview of the battles, with some analysis,

Then we will answer some questions, such as:

  • How long does it take to setup a game,
  • How long does it take to play a game,
  • How much it costs (potentially)
  • Is it accessible to new players and how easy was it to learn.

Join us, and we’ll see if we can’t convince you to try it for yourself!

(All images borrowed from the 9th Age website library, unless otherwise stated. 11/7/19)

Ferris, for the Creator Consortium

@FerrisWrites for Twitter

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Controversial article on why we game Age of Sigmar a second chance.

Building Terrain for tabletop war games? Part One, Two, Three & Four!

The 9th Age: A New Warhammer Fantasy Battles?

A month ago I wrote an article on why I was giving Age of Sigmar (AoS) a second look. The response was brilliant – we managed 9K hits with a variety of reader interaction. Some of that interaction was, understandably, hateful. I addressed the comments, which seemed to suggest I was being paid to paint Games Workshop (GW) in a brilliant light.

In the same section of comments however, I was approached by Piteglio, founder of Veil of the Ages, one of many 9th Age supporting companies. I was asked, assuming I was impartial, whether I would review the 9th Age, a community created by not-for-profit groups of tabletop war-gaming fans.

The 9th Age website has just been published with its new, atmospheric and well presented website, so it makes sense to take a look and see what all the fuss is about.

So, welcome to what will be a 3 part series reviewing the 9th Age. In the first part I’m going to be looking at the game association as a whole, discovering its foundations and ethos. I’ll also be looking at the rules and judging them for how accessible they are to veteran and new war-gaming players.

In the later articles of this series, I’ll be looking into the theme and world lore and taking a look at some of the army lists available. My focus there will be comparing Games Workshop’s old High Elves to the Highborn Elves of 9th age, and the old Empire to that of the Sohnstal Empire.

Finally, I’ll get a few games under my belt and draw some comparisons to the old Warhammer Fantasy Battles in the last episode. This should be the culmination of the mini-series and maybe somewhere along the way I’ll convince you to try a few games for yourself!

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What is 9th Age

In some western cultures, if you cannot find exactly what you’re looking for, you should have a go at making it yourself – this is the core of the foundation of the 9th Age. When GW shut down their much loved Warhammer Fantasy Battles the gaming community around it had an emotional time. When Games Workshop introduced Age of Sigmar many of the players felt aggrieved, and to some degree I agree with them.

To challenge the absence of a much loved tabletop war-game, a small group of self-motivated players decided to revive their fondness of WFB by creating something of their own. 9th Age was born.

In a nutshell, The 9th Age is:

  • a tactical, rank and file tabletop battle emulation in a pseudo-medieval fantasy world,
  • maintained by hundreds of passionate players from all over the world,
  • totally free to get your hands on the rule-books and supplements, forever!
  • designed with precision for tournament gamers, yet easy to access for casual and narrative.

Initial Misconception

When I first heard of 9th Age, we played Warhammer and Dungeons & Dragons (among other games). When we realised that the 8th Edition WFB was going to be the last, we started looking for something alternative. One housemate stumbled upon 9th Age. 

The documents and rules were still in their infancy and there was a quick series of changes which made us feel the game was not yet stable. We dropped 9th Age and investigated different ideas (or in fact, kept playing 8th edition WFB).

Looking back, we should have realised that 9th Age was still in its infancy and going through a series of developmental changes, some of which I suspect was hindered by in depth balancing and potentially some copyright laws.

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So, who are 9th Age?

The 9th Age was created and developed by 6 competitive fantasy battle enthusiasts, coming from 5 countries around the globe. That was 2015, now 270 members work towards developing the 9th Age across 29 countries. That’s pretty staggering.

What is most remarkable is that this association of like minded enthusiasts work for free. No one, at any level, earns money or fame for their hard work. There is no formal company and members are not expected to work to hard deadlines. Of course, some of them have experience in their particular areas, but as a whole, the association is free running, headed by an executive board who put the whole lot into one efficient package.

Why is this important, I hear you ask?

Unlike like most war-games, 9th Age is not run for profit – they don’t even supply miniatures for the game they created and develop which, importantly for the players of this game, means the tabletop war-game is balanced: there is no need to create better or tougher armies to sell alongside newly released miniatures. No power creep here (looking at you, Games Workshop!) It also inspired a huge run of small independent miniature model companies, creating a staggering amount of new and unique looking tabletop miniatures.

Best of all, it means the army book / army lists are inspired by the background, the world setting. Imagine, a world rich in lore and strife with well represented armies and politics? Seems too good to be true doesn’t? Well, it took a number of years for Warhammer Fantasy Battles to develop its own rich lore, so why can’t 9th Age? In fact, 9th Age has more people working on it than probably ever entered the boardrooms of Games Workshop HQ (uncited opinion).

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

Armies & Factions

Enough about who and what, let’s take a look at the game itself! I’ll address some of the questions I have or have been asked:

Can I play my favorite fantasy army?

Yup. Totally.

Currently 9th Age have 16 “army books” to play with. Each one is free and available from the 9th Age download page. They are currently all black and white, and mostly easy-print PDF documents with a couple of more detailed files as optional downloads. Did I mention they were free? Check out the Sylvan Elves full colour PDF – its big, but there is some seriously good artwork and background information there!

The list of available army lists include (in no particular order):

  1. Daemon Legions
  2. Sylvan Elves
  3. Undying Dynasties
  4. Warriors of the Dark Gods
  5. Beast Herds
  6. Dread Elves
  7. Dwarven Holds
  8. Empire of Sonnstahl (think state troops)
  9. Highborn Elves
  10. Infernal Dwarves
  11. Kingdom of Equitaine (think knights & peasants)
  12. Ogre Khans
  13. Orcs & Goblins
  14. Saurian Ancients (think lizard nations)
  15. The Vermin Swarm (think rats, rats everywhere)
  16. Vampire Covenant

On top of this list, there’s also the Asklanders and the Makhar which are supplementary armies (currently I believe they are under review). There’s also a quick guide to playing your first game, spell cards, printable terrain and an arcane compendium among other helpful and totally free downloads to get you started. Finally, you can get everything in one solid document, but I wouldn’t recommend you print it out…

Are the different armies up to date or will they change quickly?

With the exception of the last two (Asklanders & Makhar) all of the books are up to date. More importantly, they will not be changed for around 4-5 years, meaning tournament players can rely on stability and casual players benefit from being able to collect and use only what they want.

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Game Mechanics

So this is for me where the nostalgia really started to kick in. You remember when you first picked up a book for Warhammer Fantasy Battles and you had no idea how it worked, but you had the feeling that you were holding something esoteric and world changing?

That’s what I got from perusing the game mechanics. From what I could tell, everything was there that a much younger (90’s) version of myself became totally enthralled in. Armies are built based on a points system (or an amount of gold, if like me you prefer a more narrative theme), with elite troops costing more than standard troops. The design of the army starts around the leader and their entourage, with a percentage of your points allowed for certain types of troops.

The commander type characters are faceless compared to Warhammer, because the 9th Age tries to keep them realistic. They even point this out in their design statement: characters should be “folklore heroic” and not literal monsters of the battle field, something which unbalanced the later editions of Warhammer Fantasy Battles.

How hard /easy is it to learn?

This is a good question. If you are or were a player of Warhammer Fantasy Battles, you will feel totally at home. 9th Age harkens to the days where Warhammer Fantasy Battles was still balanced and made sense to the majority of its players. With the exception of names and phrases in the rule-book, I would argue 9th Age holds all the robust parts of Warhammer, with some better modifications for clarity and brevity on the tabletop. And of course, the game follows a clear turn / round system which most tabletop gamers will be comfortable with.

For totally new players, it can be quite a steep learning curve, but then so too were most tabletop war games of the time (with the exception of games like Age of Sigmar Skirmish, which I believe is a great introductory game to tabletop war-gaming). If you’re totally new to war-gaming, I suggest you read the next section.

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How accessible to new players is it?

Fortunately, there is a 9th Age beginners quick-guide, which talks you through the basics in easy to digest chunks. All you need is some paper, pencils, measuring rule and dice to get your started. This really appealed to me because you don’t need to spend any money before you start the game. You could set a game up on your bedroom floor or kitchen table with some cut-out squares and some random items to act as terrain. So long as you label your paper and cut them to the right size to represent units, you’ve not got anything to hold you back.

Running alongside the quick start guide there are some example army lists which you can print out and use. All the choices are made for you, so if you don’t know how to create a balanced army, you can use these. It’s a bit like using pre-made characters in Dungeons & Dragons – everything you need is there.

So you really don’t need to spend time buying, gluing and painting anything until you’re absolutely sure you want to get involved. It also means you get to try out different army compositions or entirely new factions. For me, this is great because there was nothing worse than buying into a Warhammer army and then realising they were completely under powered and your chances of success were limited based on your poorly informed decision!

I may need help creating one those army lists…

It has been pointed out in the comments that the 9th Age is fully compatible with BattleScribe (we reviewed Battle Scribe a while ago, here). BattleScribe is community driven and contains data for just about every tabletop game that requires army building lists. If you’re new to war-gaming, check it out, it’ll make you 9th Age army lists much quicker and likely more accurate too (and you can export and print out those lists for ease, with all the data you need).

Is it a tournament game or a casual game?

It seems, from what I can tell, to be a game designed for both. As I mentioned previously tournament players will enjoy the precision of the game, while not locking out new or casual players. You can play small games and large games wherever you are.

Where can I buy miniatures for 9th Age?

The other great thing about 9th Age is that you can use whatever miniatures you like, so long as they fit the scale, which is around 28mm miniatures. As I mentioned earlier, there is a tonne of new businesses creating miniatures in the glowing wake of 9th Age’s comet. I’ll link you to their community created list of potential sellers and distributors.

Their online magazine also has a spot-light for gamer’s armies, in which it shows how some players mix and match from different model companies to create their own unique looking forces. That said, if you have a preferred supplier of miniatures, then feel free to buy solely from them. That’s the great thing, you don’t have to buy from a monopolized supplier – you get to shop around to fit your own budget. This is doubly so for old Warhammer players, since you’ve already got your armies so you don’t need to get more!

Auf deutch, mo poppet, grazie!

English not your first language? Don’t worry – I forgot to mention that the 9th Age is translated in several languages, including:

English, French, German, Spanish, Italian and Polish…

With work being carried out for translations into Chinese (presumably Mandarin), Russian, Serbian and potentially Korean. Again, this is staggering because all this work is being done for free – it’s amazing what people can do when they share their passion for something.

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Final Thoughts

  • So far I’m getting a good vibe from 9th Age.
  • It feels much more robust than it did several years ago.
  • There is a tonne of intra- and inter-faction choices, meaning you can build an army up that fits your play style or preferred narrative theme.
  • It’s completely free, and despite this, has a very solid feeling to it, which promises fair, balanced and a fun gaming experience.
  • It seems to have the finesse for tournament or competitive players.
  • It’s accessible to brand new players
  • The quick start guide is easy to follow and you’ll be playing your first game(s) within an hour if you put your heads together.

So, will the 9th Age still have me keen to learn more? Do the factions suitably feel like the much loved armies of our youth? What does the game actually play like, how long and quickly can you pick it up..?

That’s it for part one! If you’ve got any questions for the next article, where we’ll be looking at the world lore and the factions in more detail, leave a comment and I’ll try to address them as much as I can!

Here’s a sneak peek to some of the Lore we’ll be covering…

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

All questions for part two and three. I’ll keep you posted!

If you’re interested in creating your own terrain, I’ve got a few links to some how-to articles, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, along with an article on where to get materials and tools for terrain building (more beneficial if you’re based in the UK but helpful for the US, Canada and most of Europe).

You can find me @FerrisWrites for Twitter,

Our Facebook Page!

Controversial Age of Sigmar article here Give Sigmar a Chance: Why I’m giving Games Workshops ‘Age of Sigmar’ a Second Look…!

Veil of the Ages 9th Age wargaming

And finally, as a thank you for providing information and a bit of impetus to keep writing, I’ll provide links to Veil of the Ages by Piteglio! 😉

Veil of the AgesSuccessful Kickstarter, Facebook group!

 

 

 

(All images taken from The 9th Age website and forum, they do not belong to the Creator Consortium or their writers and contributors, July 5, 2019)

Themeborne: Those Rising Dark Stars…

If you’re familiar with Themeborne and Escape the Dark Castle, you can jump straight to the section entitled “Escape the Dark Sector!”, there’s a nifty banner to help you find it!

A couple of years ago I was cruising through Kickstarter town when I came across some great looking, creepy and nostalgic artwork. I investigated, sipping my breaktime tea to find a small tabletop card game… a very simple, pleasing to the eye game.

I read deeper into this game, Escape the Dark Castle (EtDC), and fell in love with it – at this point I hadn’t even played it, or read the rules enough to fully understand them… because it did something that most new games these days fail to do…

Create an immersive atmosphere.

Fast forward a year or so and the box lands at my door. I was surprised, because the game fit into a relatively small box, but that didn’t matter, not all great things come in huge packages (know what I mean?)

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

EtDC was made and published by Themeborn. Who are Themeborne, and what about their game makes it so engaging?

Themeborne are a small design studio located in Nottingham, UK. They have a small portfolio of games on their website, but it is one that is growing. Three individuals, each with very different skills as either a writer, artist and musician make up the studio. Whoever they are, it seems to create a perfect blend of creativity. Thomas Pike, Alex Crispin and James Shelton put their heads together and created this atmospheric and easily engaged card game.

They’re exploding onto Kickstarter again, this time for a space themed game, a spiritual successor to their first, with Escape the Dark Sector – more on this later!

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

So what is Escape the Dark Castle?

Imagine waking up in a cell, in the dark. Perhaps you’ve been there for months or years suffering torture and starvation. One day, the door to your cell is open. Several others blink as they walk out of their cells. Now, how do you escape?

With this premise, player’s characters encounter situations as they flee, sometimes given choices and other times being forced to fight monsters or jailors. The game is based on a deck of well presented cards, with the players either taking it in turns to reveal the next card or deciding amongst themselves who should draw the next.

These cards acts as chapters in their escape, detailing the story as they sneak, run and fight their way through various chambers and obstacles.

Specialist 6-sided dice are used to determine survival, with each character, such as the Bishop or the Cook, having their own character cards and special dice. When fighting or struggling to overcome an obstacle, the dice are rolled against the “chapter dice” which act as a randomised challenge. If your dice roll matches one of the chapter dice, you can remove it, hopefully whittling the monster away to move onto the next chapter… or die trying!

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Not equal, however – the dice are spit into might, wisdom and cunning and each character will have a better chance at rolling one or more of these attributes, meaning some combinations of characters can hinder the escape.

The chapter cards are drawn at random during game setup, meaning there is almost limitless possibilities in the escape story. Expansions to the game, which came out this year, means there are even more cards to randomly create the story.

And finally, as your make your get-a-way, you will encounter one of several special end of game enemies, each acting differently to immolate, terrify or devour the escapees.

The chances are you’re not going to make it, with less than  25% of our stories resulting in the characters escaping the dark castle! Why? Because if one of the characters dies, everyone loses and chances are that by the time you get to the ultimate encounter, you’ll be struggling already! The odds are not stacked in your favour… and it’s great!

etDC Kit

How does it feel?

Escape the Dark Castle has many great features, which I’ll go over briefly here. The important bit is that combined, these traits create a wonderful, narrative and enjoyable game play reminiscent of Knightmare, a UK kids TV show.

Easy to learn

The rule book is slim and easy to read with direct examples of how to play. The nature of the game focuses on getting started as a group and jumping into your first game. The storytelling aspect of EtDC means that just about everyone and their grandma can learn to play. Each player is encouraged to read out the chapter card they draw and are written in an old sword and sorcery style.

Quick as you like Pace

They say that the game takes 2 minutes to setup and around 30 minutes to play. I disagree with the 30 minutes but only because the game can be played as quickly or as slowly as you like. We’ve played many games of EtDC and frankly, when you’re sat around a table in a dimly lit room, the atmosphere suggests you take it slowly… but as you near the last chapter card, the pace quickens… almost as if you’re running blindly through a dark castle and can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Social, Inclusive, Cooperative

This is a game for everyone (assuming they can read, and even then, others can help). Because it is truly a cooperative game, where everyone or no one is a winner, it’s very easy to get involved. Who draws the next card can be decided democratically, people can look at the state of their character and think: I can’t survive another round of fighting! Others will openly declare that they can take whatever happens next, effectively ‘taking one for the team’ so there’s room for limelight too.

The inclusion of ‘equipment’ cards adds an extra dimension to the escapees: who will take the rusted sword, or who needs to eat the stale bread?

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game
Even Grandma can learn to play…

Variety

There are 45 chapter cards in the basic game, of which 11 are randomly drawn to create each story. The chances of drawing the same 11 cards each time are so astronomically low that you’d have to play thousands of games to get an exact same combination. But worry not, there are several expansions already out for EtDC and each one adds even more chapter cards, end of game bosses and even starting cards to the story. Cult of the Death Knight, Scourge of the Undead Queen and Blight of the Plaguelord are great additions, each one bringing more themes and story to your escape.

Value

With 3 expansions, a collector’s box, play mat, card sleeves, a book of character deaths (I know, right?) a story book and even an 80’s style musical cassette you’d be forgiven for thinking that the prices are going to match the likes of Fantasy Flight Games. Except that they’re not.

The Core game is priced at £30 – and this is truly all you need. The expansions, which you could buy several years down the line, are priced at £15 each and everything else is £20 or less, depending on what you want – Themeborne have made a great little game that is affordable and so re-playable you’ll never get to experience every possible combination of game.

And now they’re going a step further and taking us into the timeless void of space, where no one can hear you scream…

Escape the Dark Sector!

Escape the Dark Sector

ETDS Logo

Escape the Dark Sector is a science-fiction adventure, pitting the beleaguered crew of a ship against a detention block space station. Again, if anyone dies, the game is over, presumably because the ship can’t be flown without a full crew!

Themeborne suggest that the story and game-play comes from popular science fiction of the 80’s, including Alien, Startrek and Star Wars combined with the literary adventures of the amazing Fighting Fantasy novels and classic Dungeons & Dragons – much like Escape the Dark Castle!

Whether you like all of those titles or not, it seems there is something for everyone.

What’s different?

The core storytelling concepts from EtDC still run through Dark Sector, but Themeborne have introduced several new and easy to learn mechanics to the game and its setup. They make sense too, creating cinematic shootouts with aliens. So what’s new?

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

The Setup

The characters are familiar to those who played EtDC – each character has a dice specific to them to roll during actions and combat. However, adding onto the basic character concepts, players can choose ‘cybernetic implants’ which give their characters an edge in certain situations.

The story aspect has been developed to include not one single stack of story chapters and instead is now made up of three acts which, we’re told ups the tempo and intensity the deeper into the escape story the players drive their characters.

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

The Gameplay

Since the theme of Dark Sector has catapulted the story into space, so too has the technology level, introducing tactical combat actions and  ranged combat.

Tactical combat actions include shooting, charging, reloading. re-equipping, and flanking, giving the game a much more tactical feel without detracting from the flow of the game. As is the way of Themeborne games, the action to charge is carried over for each character, meaning when one of you declares a charge, everyone has to go with them! It’s all or nothing!

Further, the action to heal some wounds can only be taken by one character at a time. No one gets to sit out for more than a round either. This seems to have upped the challenge! To balance this, certain actions such as reload or flank mean your character is not targeted by the enemy, but at least one character has to choose to fight or shoot. Actions come in the form of cards, where the character dice are placed in order to keep track more easily.

Ranged combat involves equipment and dice specifically related to the weapons, which, we’re told are not always positive effects for the characters. They seem to include ballistic, beam and explosive symbols, so no doubt each one comes with risks!

Some monsters and enemies are affected by or deal special damage depending on the type of ranged attack being made, so teamwork is still at the centre of the game mechanics – pile it up together or decide who should be shooting what weapon and you’ll crack the chapter and be able to move on!

If you want a copy of Escape the Dark Sector you’ll need to back the Kickstarter, there’s less than 40 hours left! Otherwise you can wait for the official release online, sometime next year!

Alternatively, you can grab yourself a copy of Escape the Dark Castle!

You can find the Kickstarter here

Themeborne website and shop

@FerrisWrites for Twitter and our Facebook page.

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – How Times Change.

It has been a while since my last article, but not to worry, Eve hasn’t beaten me yet.

 

The corporation has been steadily growing in organisational strength – there is a certain time where you realise that your endeavour must evolve from a fun little side project to one that will require a ton more time, I think now is that point.

Space hauler ship corp beginner new bro eve

I also trained into my first tier 2 ship! Not a super amazing combat ship; oh, no. It’s a hauler, which I found very amusing. I definitely have to prioritise the corp and ease of transport over shiny ships. I also recently trained into a tier 3 – which I was very surprised to find out aren’t necessarily better than tier 2 ships, they just have some funky features that allow them to be flexible. I only found out when it completed training however, that I trained into the wrong ship when setting up my skill queue – not such a bad thing when you have no idea what you’re doing!

Space fighter ship tier 3 eve online beginner corp wormhole

We began our journey in a Class 2 wormhole with very slim pickings when it came to neighbours, loot and things to do. It also didn’t help that we were besieged by another corporation for a solid week, which hit morale hard at a time when we were trying to really build up and organise.

 

However, after those hard few weeks, we made the move to a different wormhole which has a lot more to offer us in terms of profitability, fun and interesting neighbours and an element of secrecy and protection. Honestly it feels nice to finally call ourselves a Wormhole Corp.

Eve online base astrahus citadel corp wormhole beginner new

I am still trying to find more time to play, but that will come if I stay dedicated. I have had some of the most fun experiences in my gaming career with Eve and it’s all thanks to starting EternalCosmicBeardCorp.

 

The plan going forward is to set up some passive income with planetary interaction, start organising fleet ops and roams, form a cohesive doctrine for multiple situations, but most importantly to recruit some new Beards!

 

If you want a place to hang out and have some fun in this insanely complicated game, ECBC is a newbro and casual friendly Corp that emphasises the fact that we are all learning this together. We have some amazing people who are incredibly patient and we’re working on multiple guides to allow you to get to where you want to be as quick as possible.

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game beard corp corporation

Also, our little community is very accepting, we all love just chatting about stupid things. A sense of humour is a must – we also have just implemented authentication by ESI, so keep that in mind, oh and please do have a working mic. We operate in the EU/US Time Zone.

 

We want you to undock with us, get scanning and get killing! We’re all in this together, and we’re all here to make Eve fun.

 

If you’re interested, hop on over to the discord and we can have a good chat:

 

https://discord.gg/nzsBfuW

 

Until next time,

 

Fly Safe.

 

Lizard – CEO

Give Sigmar a Chance: Why I’m giving Games Workshops ‘Age of Sigmar’ a Second Look…

Age of Sigmar is a tabletop war-game set in a fantasy world created by Games Workshop (GW). The game involves miniatures to represent warriors and monsters, with dices rolls used to represent the fray of battle as two or more players strive to defeat their opponents.

Warhammer Fantasy Battles (WFB) was the precursor to Age of Sigmar, and its development into the newer game was fraught with poor decision making and knee jerk reactions, with an unhealthy dose of corporate foolery.

I was a long time fan of Warhammer in its earlier and middle life. It was something I grew up with. Its strong sense of fantasy and rich lore was inspiring to a young boy, teenager and adult. As a nerd, it was a binding force among friends that ran alongside games like Dungeons & Dragons. It was a large part of our youth.

I took time out from Warhammer and GW they fell out of favour with me for many reasons. So when I heard about the new Age of Sigmar I was hopeful for a balanced and fun game. I felt let down and the following history tale feels like a terrible loss to something I held very dearly.

But I’m giving GW a second chance, and I’ll explain why later.

First, some history…

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures

The Lore Unflinching

Since its inception in 1983, Warhammer Fantasy Battle has been rich in its setting, abundant history and legends combined with inspiring artwork and grandiose tales. It was for the most part, a thing of beauty, the likes of which no other company had managed to create. WFB ran until 2010, with 27 years of added legends and story, enriching its own lore within each incarnation, eventually ploughing itself into an 8th and final edition.

However, a common complaint is that the story of the world never really advanced. Most of the rich storytelling, the history of the world, had already taken place. Global political and natural events had already shaped the world, from the war between Elves and Dwarves to the cataclysms that shaped the geography. With the exception of the incursions forces of Chaos (the ultimate big bad guys of the setting) very little else changed, and for 27 years humanity and its allies stood on the brink of extermination and extinction… yet was never quite defeated or victorious.

Arguably there’s a difference between the campaign world and the larger written fiction world: Despite gaps in the world, the GW development team failed to seize and advanced certain narrative arcs or historical campaigns, such as the War of the Beard, pitching Elves and Dwarves into a war that lasted years, creating offshoots of each nation / faction. Despite having untapped regions on the world map, it seemed that GW prematurely ran out of geographical room, never actually filling out all the regions in detail. The missed opportunities were vast.

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures

A Lore Uncopyrighted

WFB was expanded in the 80’s and as such borrowed much of its history and cultural ideas from Lord of the Rings which saw a rise in popularity and profile during that decade. Warhammer was generally considered a variant of many different stories and world settings at a time when copyrighting the name of a species wasn’t ever considered.

This borrowing of cultures and ideas meant that other, smaller companies were able to borrow in turn from GW. Being a large and successful company, GW didn’t like that idea. The prime example of this is the novel “Spots the Space Marinewhich GW wanted removed for copyright reasons. Owning ‘Space Marine’ for themselves was apparently critical to their business model.

When you considered how much GW borrowed from other media, you realise that much of their content was not their own. Copyrighting that content and cornering the market to their benefit was not possible with the old WFB lore. They would have to change everything… which Age of Sigmar does; the heart warming Elves, Dwarves, Goblins and Orcs were replaced with Aelves, Duardin, Grots and Orruk. It’s also hard to copyright historical figures and names, looking at you Bretonnian players!

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures

Compounding the Fractures

For new players, starting a game of Warhammer can be costly, with players investing their time and precious money into buying miniatures, paints, brushes, terrain boards and books to create their armies. If you just look at the price of the miniatures, you can spend hundreds of your precious monies before you’ve assembled anything. So when a game loses its appeal to old gamers, and new gamers can’t afford to start playing, sales begin drop and any company is likely to worry. But GW didn’t seem to learn with each new edition of WFB…

The 6th Edition of WFB was considered ‘alright’ in its early days for game balance. It still had its problems, much like any game. Unfortunately it was the start of the fall, where the final few Army Books published showed an increase in the power creep (where successive armies would be significantly tougher and cheaper to purchase in-game). Matching armies to play a fair game was harder and players started to emulate the winners creating a stale gaming style. Spending hundreds of pounds on an impressive army didn’t guarantee a satisfactory win/lose ratio.

7th Edition compounded on 6th edition and was the point in time when the famous (probably misquote) “We’re a miniature company not a games company” by the CEO of that time, Kirby. This was considered the primary unbalanced version of the game. This was also the time of the GW store changes, where a single member of staff was expected to run the store. This lead to an end of local store tournaments and a reliance on local independent gaming stores to do the hard work, which they were not prepared to do.

8th Edition simply added on top of this again, removing some parts of the game that required skill and understanding and replaced them with unbalanced armies and rules in totality.

 

Mat Ward held the creative reigns during these times of troubles and was supposedly responsible for the power creep of factions – most of the army supplement books were under his name which unfortunately lead to a loss in popularity. This lower-quality “modelling business” seems to have driven a core of players away, especially when GW tried to claim gamers only made up 20% of their sales (maybe they included digital games and fiction in those sales numbers, who knows). Still, 20% is a huge chunk of your market and not to be sniffed at.

The messiah Jedi to bring balance should have been 9th Edition and was rumoured to be an amazing game of fortitude and fun. However, some internet folks believe that this dropped the sales of the 8th edition as players saved their cash ready to spend it all in a glorious fit of nerd-frenzy… GW scrapped most of what 9th edition could have been. Frankly, GW had failed its panic test and bottled it, doing something so knee jerk worthy that many of their core fans and players simply stared in disbelief.

They killed it all off.

In an act of terrible corporate zeal, it was deemed unworthy and so all of it had to burn, apparently.

Warhammer 40K, the Expanding Galaxy

On the other hand, GW’s Warhammer 40,000 (40K) storyline moved onwards in the grim darkness of the 41st millenium. Players still flocked to it and it seemed always popular. Everyone loves “Spess Ma-reens!” So while WFB fell, GW put their time and effort into 40K. This lead to more delays and lethargy in creating content for WFB, hammering further nails into its coffin.

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures age of sigmar

Birth of the Mortal Realms, the Age of Sigmar

It was expected that 9th edition was going to mend itself, bandage its blood spouting wounds, stick on an eye patch and throw itself back into the fight for the old world with a grizzled low growl. But with the panicked reaction from a slump in sales, GW rushed ahead with Age of Sigmar and dumped the Old World. The lore and world history of WFB was abolished, the relics and lessons of the Old World were forgotten and the new world, the world of Mortal Realms was born.

Many fans were outraged (I mean, it is the internet) and a solid core of supporting players felt abandoned and ignored. No doubt many miniatures ended up in the bin, or left to fend for themselves Toy Story style in a box of Barbie dolls… or likely ended up on eBay.

Warhammer now looked like something from Magic the Gathering, minus the charm.

So why, after the loss of something held very dear, am I giving Age of Sigmar and Games Workshop another chance?

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures age of sigmar

Age of Sigmar

The new game is very accessible and despite frankly large problems, holds promise. The core rules are completely free and readily available online to print out yourselves.

Now you can play the game as a narrative (discard point values for armies) or you can carry out matched play, where you decide on the points values for your forces. This means you can tailor games for competitions or story driven wars.

A Battle Narrative

The revived and quick to learn rules have given GW a chance at another shot to regain the glory of the old days – quite simply it’s a shame they had to destroy everything the fans loved about the setting (but all is not lost). Games are now played in scenarios. This put me off originally, because I love a good ruck in the mud with swords and death, but actually, scenarios allows me to play a relatively weak force (High Elves, who are now Swifthawk Riders) against an incredibly overpowered force (such as the Beastclaw Raiders) and hopefully run rings around them, because no army is able to be perfect in a randomly determined scenario.

Embers of the Old World

Thankfully, GW are still publishing fiction related to the Old World. They’ve even gone back further and re-released fiction before the time of Karl Franz (the emperor with the big hammer at WFB peak). Third parties such as Cubicle 7 have brought fresh life to the Old World with a renewed and updated version of the Warhammer Fantasy Roleplaying Game (we had a peek early on here…) and God’s bless the Creative Assembly for sticking with the Old World in their very successful Total War: Warhammer series (which merges two of my favourite things wonderfully).

And finally… Gotrek Gurnison lives! The doom-seeking Slayer wandered out of the time warping Chaos Wastes of the Old World to bring some good old fashioned Slayer perspective in Realm Slayer. Gotrek quests through the Mortal Realms to find his manling sidekick, Felix Jaeger, who may have been reincarnated as a Stormcast Eternal! This is a great tale that sets the scene for Age of Sigmar and throws us veteran players a much desired connection to the World that Once was.

Gotrek Gurnison Felix Jaeger troll salay beast slayer everything slayer

So, like with the new Star Wars movies – the new stuff doesn’t invalidate the old stuff – you can still read and watch the old stories and enjoy them for what they are. You can do the same for Warhammer.

GW took a huge gamble which seems to have paid off.

At least for now…

Absolutely Final Bit

If you keep up to date with the acts of GW and their Age of sigmar game, you may want to take a look at this petition that is over five years old. If you read it you’ll see that most of what the petition was asking for has actually been met by the GW. Shame they never actually replied to the petition…

https://www.change.org/p/games-workshop-limited-refocus-your-business-model-on-the-sale-of-a-game-and-support-of-a-gaming-community-vice-the-pure-sale-of-collectible-miniatures

That about wraps it up for now! Thanks for reading, and as ever, your comments and discussion are always welcome. perhaps you know something we don’t and would like to share your thoughts?

@FerrisWrites for Twitter and our Facebook page.

Interested in table top terrain crafting?

Warhammer Fantasy role-playing?

Looking for a cool army list builder, Battlescribe?

Thinking of buying from Forge World?

If you’re meme game is high, check out ‘2+Tough and re-rolling ones

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – Growing Pains.

I think I’m getting this game; finally. When you first start playing, everything is so overwhelming that you become so sure that it’s almost impossible to know enough to fulfill the criteria in your head that would lead you to class yourself as “competent” – it’s as unattainable in those first few weeks as flapping your arms and flying to the moon.

 

Then, when you surround yourself with good people and put the time into fitting ships and getting blown up again and again but learning, then you start to see how things fit together, how you need a fleet composed of specific ships to do specific things if you want to beat actual people. Fighting NPCs is similar, but the human is the most fierce prey, ha.

 

We have a good number of people in the corporation now, to the point where I think we’re done with the first round of recruitment: let’s see how many of our amazing people can deal with my sub-par leadership to make it to phase two! Which shall be kicking off in little more than a month.

 

The project is going a lot smoother than I expected; the whole idea was to get people playing the game, interacting and having fun without a strict corp structure and scheduling – these things will still exist for events and fleet ops etc, but I have no interest in enforcing lots of imaginary rules in an imaginary game.

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Other than that, we’re staring at our skill queue, waiting for doctrine ships to train so we can all go ratting as a fleet and rake in the monies.

 

Just a quick update for a standard week in the life of a know-nothing CEO. Until next time, fly safe.
Boboko Busanagi of EternalCosmicBeardCorp.

Tabletop War-Game Terrain & Scenery Part Three: Putting it all Together

In the last few weeks I’ve gone over some of the techniques for making battlefield terrain. The focus has been on buildings and structures and this week we’re going to finish that theme off by bringing it all together. I promised some multistory buildings too. Read on to see more of the good stuff and how I achieved the beginnings of some great results!

What am I doing?

I decided to make everything so that it would fit on convenient 15 x 15 cm tiles. This was so that I could orientate the same tiles to create different looking terrain, whether I’m playing Age of Sigmar, AoS Skirmish, Frostgrave or even some Dungeons & Dragons.

Similar tiles can be used to create urban scenery in Warhammer 40,000, which I’ll cover at some point in the future.

wargame wargames terrain building modelling warhammer 40K age of sigmar AOS miniatures frostgrave

I also upgraded my hot-wire cutter. It was a little more expensive, in the £50-60 region, but the arm doesn’t flex, the wire doesn’t bend and it heats up consistently making its ability to cut through foam much better! Alarmingly, the wire does glow bright orange, which was a little disconcerting at first!

So how did I do, what did I do, and how did I do it? Read on…

A trial run…

I decided to test my formula for creating tabletop scenery with an unsuspecting volunteer. I quickly ran down the basic steps of creating the terrain piece, introduced the volunteer to a hot glue gun and Styrofoam, hefted a tonne of miniature bricks onto the table and allowed that person to run away with their imagination. This is the outcome so far (note, it still needs painting).

 

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As you can see, it really doesn’t take much to get stuck in and have a go. Once again, there wasn’t a huge amount of planning involved in the creation of this quaint little tower – imagination provided the blueprints and away they went!

The Tile Set Blueprints

OK, so creating as many 15 x 15 cm tiles as required. To make my life easier, I got hold of some 1 cm thick black Styrofoam. It was an eBay purchase and cost me about £16 but may be cheaper in other parts of the world. Why did I buy these? It’s quite difficult to thin down thick Styrofoam on account of the wobbly nature of the hot-wire cutter.

So, not everything needs be to broken or derelict, no, there needs to be more so I’m going to build some complete structures which fit on the 15 cm tiles; watchtowers, tall walls, dead-ends, bell towers, warehouses, pig pens, shambolic defensive positions – you name it!

Because each tile is essentially 6 x 6 inches, I can fit four in a single square foot. Multiply this by four and you’ve got yourself an interchangeable, customisable and modular tabletop terrain system. I’ll go to town on some bigger open plazas with ruined columns etc in the future (to make it easier and give any missile troops a chance).

Footpaths & Plazas

From a design point of view, I’d like to build some footpaths, essentially narrow death traps that must be risked to get to different places on the map.  Here are some images of the test pieces I worked on. It can take time to get it right, so give yourself an open mind when you’re trying out ideas – you won’t put pressure on yourself and get worked up by perceived ‘failures’ at the end of your crafting session.

 

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The dirt footpaths are 5 x 15 cm. By applying a lot of pressure with some scrunched up tin foil to the centre of the Styrofoam piece, and lighter touches to the outer quarters I was able to create the impression that the path had been used for many years. I cut some 0.5 x 0.5 x 15 slithers of foam and cut them up, weathering and aging them with the foil to look like curb pieces.

In the future when I attempt larger roads, I will use the ‘crazy pathing’ idea and simply trim the pieces down to compensate for the curb. I’ll also impress the foam in places to make it look like carts had been through, wearing down the road over the years.

The roads should be at least 10 cm wide and up to 30 cm long (the extent of my purchased Styrofoam sheets) – they will look good running through the centre of the board, or alongside the boards on bigger battle arenas. Details are important here, so I need to think about how I’m going to decorate the pieces to make them believable.

It sounds easy, but it’s actually very hard to make simple open spaces and retain the feeling of interest and wonder. Because there’s likely no focal point to grab the eye, it needs to have a few extra details to keep the area ‘alive’ and quirky.

I’ve decided on a single gallows with some stakes rammed into the ground to keep people away from ‘justice’ being served…

wargame wargames terrain building modelling warhammer 40K age of sigmar AOS miniatures frostgrave

I added some ‘crazy pathing’ for a bit more variety, weathering the whole lot with the tin foil method. To make the pathing stones I cut foam strips 2 x 2 cm then went over the corners, freehand cutting in irregular ways. I then cut the stones from the end of the strips at 0.5 cm, creating odd and mismatched but flat stones. In hindsight, I should have cut these narrow than 0.5 cm, maybe half that again to 0.25 cm.

Texture is also important, so I’ll likely be using some of the rolling pins from Green Stuff World. An example of my trial run with these can be found in the images below…

 

 

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Ramping It Up!

Finally, I decided to have a go at the multistory building idea.

I wanted to make this bigger, but I also wanted to be able to use different parts of it at different times. To achieve this, I started with 4 tiles to make a jumbo tile and began building a wall which would interconnect. I added a ruined wall around the edges of the jumbo tile, leaving plenty of gaps and debris for cover and interesting features.

wargame wargames terrain building modelling warhammer 40K age of sigmar AOS miniatures frostgrave

I then started to make a second story of brickwork, which I could lock or lay in place and built this up a few times. Finally, I made a third story set of brickwork, but this time to accommodate half a roof.

The roof in these pieces was made from foam board, which is light and tough. I cut out rows of packing card (the sort of thin card your Amazon books are delivered in). Each row was 2 cm high with a cut  1 cm deep every 1 cm along the row. I then just cut and hacked out pieces to create the impression of roof slates. This was time consuming, but quite rewarding. You can see some of the details in the image below.

wargame wargames terrain building modelling warhammer 40K age of sigmar AOS miniatures frostgrave

Finally, here’s a series of images showing you how to connect together.

 

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OK, so its not complete yet (I mean, I did just complete an entire week of a UK LARP event!) So I’ll post some images next week.

That’s it for now, and the end of this miniseries for terrain and scenery. If you’ve learnt anything, or if you have some advice and tips of your own, please leave a message in the comments below.

There will be more on tabletop terrain in the future, but for now, I really want to get these pieces finished and have them lined up for some gaming!

Good luck, and have fun!

Ferris

Part One…

Part Two…

Twitter @FerrisWrites or @TheCConsortium

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