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Runaljod: The Sound of the Runes – Heroic Battles in A Frozen Apocalypse

Our streak of luck is maintained as this week we were able to get our hands on the early version of a rather cool and epic sounding board game, Runaljod: The Sound of the Runes! Runaljod is brought to us by Tempo Games, a Spanish company.

In the competitive world of indie board games, it is quite common to see some interesting and beguiling game mechanics. Runaljod is one such game, but we think it stands out as a game that most of us will enjoy more because of its fusion of tactics and chance.

Runaljod is an adventure board game. It combines tactical combat with dice rolls and special abilities, board exploration with random encounters, and casting runes to provide power to your characters actions and abilities.

If you have played; Hero Quest, Star Wars: Imperial Assault or Mice & Mystics you will be familiar with the mechanics of this game. Runaljod does all of these games justice too.

It is worth mentioning that the prototype game we played is still going through adjustments and testing. The rules were also hastily translated from Spanish to English, so we hope we got things right!

Let’s take a look at the game as a whole.

runaljod sound of the runes creator consortium board game tabletop game action fantasy norse early review kickstarter miniatures

What is Runaljod?

Runaljod is a cooperative game, putting the players and their characters against enemies and creatures found in Norse mythology. The game takes place on small board sections which are revealed as the game unfolds. The game is broken down into the hero phase and the enemy phase. The heroes do not follow a turn sequence as in other board games, instead they decide who will perform an action before deciding who can carry out the next action.

This player driven sequence means players must discuss and weigh up their options, because the enemy follow a simple artificial intelligence system… which we found to be quite lethal.

Now for a little more detail…

Narrative

In Runaljod, four heroes attempt to stem the flow of monsters and enemies who are flooding into their realm for reasons as yet unknown. Spoiler: there’s a big ass giant.

The game can be played in several modes, from single, one-off adventures, to campaigns where several adventures are linked together in the form of a narrative. Don’t have four players? No problem, the rules we received cover special circumstances so you can play the game all by yourself if you can’t find budding heroes to help on your quest.

We think it’s early days for the creators – there’s still very little out there regarding the rest of the story, but we think Runaljod to be a sleeping giant, an avalanche of story potential to really pack the game with world lore!

Setting Up

Runaljod seems a little complicated at first, but in hindsight this observation proved false. The process involves creating a deck of exploration cards, which determine the board pieces you use, the starting location of the enemies, monsters and heroes. The exploration cards also shows where there may be treasure and where to move to when you’re ready to try the next board section.

 

This exploration deck always contains particular start and finish cards, with random cards assigned to the middle of the deck. We liked this because it provides an element of chance to the game, providing us with different scenarios and challenges – in theory each game should be unique depending on how many cards are provided in the final released version of the game.

There are several other decks, which provide abilities for characters, equipment, random events and finally the enemy data cards and artificial intelligence deck. There’s also a host of tokens, which are used for special abilities, such as stun or bleed tokens, tokens for wounds, trance tokens (used by the Volva character) and coloured cubes for the hero character cards to keep track of health points and glory points.

runaljod sound of the runes creator consortium board game tabletop game action fantasy norse early review kickstarter miniatures

 

The board pieces vary in size and shape, from rectangles of 24x11cm to squares as large as 30x30cm. They’re also double sided, so the box isn’t quite so heavy, and we save ourselves a bit of deforestation – all new considerations to the board gaming world! There’s also the “Altar of the Gods” which is where the extra runes are placed, and acts as a home for the exploration cards and time tracker.

Finally, the miniatures are all placed on the board – and these are pretty well sculpted – but more on those later!

Your Characters

The four characters available are classic Norse / viking archetypes, each with their own special abilities and equipment: the berzerker, with a powerful axe and very little armour, the shield maiden with her stout shield to defend her allies, to the spell weaving Volva (a type of Witch) and the keen eyed Hunter with his bow.

Each character comes with their own “dashboard” which is where most of your planning and actions will take place, and of course a finely detailed miniature. Now, we know that these are prototype miniatures but the detail is rather impressive! Take a look at the 3D render of some of these miniatures, and compare them to the hastily taken photographs I took – check out that chain-mail detail!

The level of detail in the miniatures is carried into the enemy and monster miniatures too, more on those in a moment!

Their Abilities

Each character has their own specific deck of cards, which provide certain abilities to perform as actions. These actions require you to use a particular rune to activate, and once activated, that rune cannot be used again that turn – or even the turn after! This is because at the start of each phase you recast the runes, which we’ve described below.

Characters can purchase additional equipment which provides greater offensive and defensive measures during the game, which leads us nicely to the…

Novel Mechanics

There are several novel game mechanics which we found particularly pleasing. Not only are they novel, they’re also a bit of very cunning game design expertly disguised as fun game play elements.

The one we want to talk about the most is casting runes. Yes, much like in a real reading of the runes, you as the player takes up the handful of rune stones, shake them vigorously in both hands, and cast them down onto the table in front of you!

How these runes land determine how you may use them: if they land face up you may use them to perform actions and abilities – some abilities require specific runes to use, so if that rune landed face down, you cannot use that rune! However, if the rune landed on its edge, you can collect extra runes to throw later, or even harness the power of the gods by activating a specific godly rune which possesses a powerful ability.

runaljod sound of the runes creator consortium board game tabletop game action fantasy norse early review kickstarter miniatures

Why do we like this unusual system?

It feels good, it feels real and brings you to the table in a way that other games cannot. It’s a great way of bringing energy to the game too, because you’re all hoping to get to use as many runes as you can – Runaljod is a cooperative game, so to succeed you need to cast those runes as best as you can, or rely on others to help you when you don’t.

A good rune casting can also make you feel like a hero, without a poor rune casting making you feel like a useless chump – there’s always something you can do, even if you’re just formulating a plan and being the voice of that plan.

Interestingly, any runes you do not use to access an ability or skill are saved for the next turn, so if you’re struggling to throw some good runes you can save some, guaranteeing you actions on your next turn.

runaljod sound of the runes creator consortium board game tabletop game action fantasy norse early review kickstarter miniatures

There’s a time wheel in Runaljod, which marks how many turns you have left to complete the current section of the board – run out of time and you lose the game. Different events and exploration cads may reset this time tracker, or it may only partially reset the time tracker – we actually liked this, because it means you are sometimes forced to make decisions which you normally wouldn’t in a typical board game.

The attention to detail in Runaljod is great, because the time tracker uses a serpent motif with the head of the serpent approaching the tail, bringing the world to its end – if you’re not familiar with Norse mythology, this is Jormungandr, the world serpent who takes part in the end of the world, Ragnarok!

With a single turn left, you may have to decide who dies and who lives from amongst the heroes, as the goal is to defeat the enemy in time. Make a poor choice, or attempt to heal your allies and you potentially waste time. Don’t be put off by this though, as it’s part of the game challenge and shouldn’t be seen as a negative impact – it adds tension and a dash of excitement.

Your Enemies & Artificial Intelligence

Enemies in Runaljod are savage. The enemies act depending on the draw of a card. This makes the game particularly blood thirsty on occasions, particularly when enemies are told to target a specific character over others!

Each type of enemy is given up to two actions, sometimes stating the direction or target they should take. And it’s not always the nearest hero they have to target! What we liked about this card system is that some detail the order in which the specific heroes are targeted, using the different coloured shields present on the character cards.

Sometimes an enemy miniature may be told to move and attack a hero with a specific damage token. When no target has that specific token, what does the enemy do? It simply defaults to the nearest target it can, and performs actions accordingly.

The exception to the A.I deck are enemies or monsters that have their own decks, which provides in detail what actions that miniature does. This gives them specific attacks and allows them to act differently from the rest of the enemies.

Combat in the Frozen Land

Combat is straightforward in Runaljod, but that doesn’t make it easy!Every offensive action or item has colour coded squares present on their card. Thee translate into dice. There are three types of dice, white, black and red.Each dice has a face of different weapons, which roughly translate to 1, 2 or 3 points of damage.

runaljod sound of the runes creator consortium board game tabletop game action fantasy norse early review kickstarter miniatures

Each enemy, monster and hero has a defence value, which deducts the damage dealt by the dice. But be warned! Each dice also has the infinity symbol, which allows the attacker to perform special attacks, which can include powerful abilities such as being unable to defend against the dealt damage.

Damage is translated to health points, and when a hero uses up all their health points, they are knocked down! But there is an action to get yourself up again!

We like the combat dice, they are reminiscent of good old Hero Quest (remember those dice with skulls and shields on them?) So there’s a nice nostalgic feel whilst being efficient and quick. That isn’t to say making the choices or having the runes available make it the combat easy!

Appearance & Artwork

The artwork is superb, evocative of the cold northern climate that Norse sagas are famous for. It also adds an epic element to the game, as we see titanic wolves, colossal giants and other nightmarish creatures.

Rodrigo Flores is responsible for the artwork here, but much like Tempo Games, I cannot find a link to showcase his other artwork. I’ll be in touch and see what I can find for you! For now, enjoy some of the samples Tempo Games have to offer…

runaljod sound of the runes creator consortium board game tabletop game action fantasy norse early review kickstarter miniatures

Miniaturas Alemany produced for the excellent miniatures for Runaljod – the same company who produce high quality miniatures for Avatars of War and Chaos Factory. These are not your regular run of the mill miniatures, and I suspect that the resin casts are probably going to be just as well defined in the final product. They’re awesome miniatures!

Final Thoughts

We think Runaljod is a game for gamers. It is a little more complicated than the likes of traditional or abstract board games. That said, once we got started the game become more intuitive and easy to follow. We tried the game with four players and a “games master” to speed things up. With a proper translation and some proofing, we think this issue will be resolved easily.

The game feels great, it is a high fantasy sword and sorcery style board game with a focus on combat, but also includes some character advancement. It can be fast paced with practice, and it really can punish you for a mistake. We love it because it was atmospheric, a challenge and delicately balanced. The artwork and miniatures are evocative and perfectly detailed, making this game the best polished game we’ve tried so far – even CMON would struggle to get this level of detail!

We’re told that Tempo Games are hoping to create Runaljod: The Sound of the Runes for German, Italy and Spain, covering the entire of the EU, or as close as they can!

Runaljod kick starts in 22nd October, assuming no delays!

If you want to see some of the mayhem played out, you can check out Summoned Games on YouTube. We’d like to thank them for giving us the opportunity to play the game early!

That’s all from me, drop us a comment and tell us what you think of Runaljod so far!

Ferris, CC

@FerrisWrites for Twitter, or our Facebook page!

Themeborne: Those Rising Dark Stars…

If you’re familiar with Themeborne and Escape the Dark Castle, you can jump straight to the section entitled “Escape the Dark Sector!”, there’s a nifty banner to help you find it!

A couple of years ago I was cruising through Kickstarter town when I came across some great looking, creepy and nostalgic artwork. I investigated, sipping my breaktime tea to find a small tabletop card game… a very simple, pleasing to the eye game.

I read deeper into this game, Escape the Dark Castle (EtDC), and fell in love with it – at this point I hadn’t even played it, or read the rules enough to fully understand them… because it did something that most new games these days fail to do…

Create an immersive atmosphere.

Fast forward a year or so and the box lands at my door. I was surprised, because the game fit into a relatively small box, but that didn’t matter, not all great things come in huge packages (know what I mean?)

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

EtDC was made and published by Themeborn. Who are Themeborne, and what about their game makes it so engaging?

Themeborne are a small design studio located in Nottingham, UK. They have a small portfolio of games on their website, but it is one that is growing. Three individuals, each with very different skills as either a writer, artist and musician make up the studio. Whoever they are, it seems to create a perfect blend of creativity. Thomas Pike, Alex Crispin and James Shelton put their heads together and created this atmospheric and easily engaged card game.

They’re exploding onto Kickstarter again, this time for a space themed game, a spiritual successor to their first, with Escape the Dark Sector – more on this later!

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

So what is Escape the Dark Castle?

Imagine waking up in a cell, in the dark. Perhaps you’ve been there for months or years suffering torture and starvation. One day, the door to your cell is open. Several others blink as they walk out of their cells. Now, how do you escape?

With this premise, player’s characters encounter situations as they flee, sometimes given choices and other times being forced to fight monsters or jailors. The game is based on a deck of well presented cards, with the players either taking it in turns to reveal the next card or deciding amongst themselves who should draw the next.

These cards acts as chapters in their escape, detailing the story as they sneak, run and fight their way through various chambers and obstacles.

Specialist 6-sided dice are used to determine survival, with each character, such as the Bishop or the Cook, having their own character cards and special dice. When fighting or struggling to overcome an obstacle, the dice are rolled against the “chapter dice” which act as a randomised challenge. If your dice roll matches one of the chapter dice, you can remove it, hopefully whittling the monster away to move onto the next chapter… or die trying!

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Not equal, however – the dice are spit into might, wisdom and cunning and each character will have a better chance at rolling one or more of these attributes, meaning some combinations of characters can hinder the escape.

The chapter cards are drawn at random during game setup, meaning there is almost limitless possibilities in the escape story. Expansions to the game, which came out this year, means there are even more cards to randomly create the story.

And finally, as your make your get-a-way, you will encounter one of several special end of game enemies, each acting differently to immolate, terrify or devour the escapees.

The chances are you’re not going to make it, with less than  25% of our stories resulting in the characters escaping the dark castle! Why? Because if one of the characters dies, everyone loses and chances are that by the time you get to the ultimate encounter, you’ll be struggling already! The odds are not stacked in your favour… and it’s great!

etDC Kit

How does it feel?

Escape the Dark Castle has many great features, which I’ll go over briefly here. The important bit is that combined, these traits create a wonderful, narrative and enjoyable game play reminiscent of Knightmare, a UK kids TV show.

Easy to learn

The rule book is slim and easy to read with direct examples of how to play. The nature of the game focuses on getting started as a group and jumping into your first game. The storytelling aspect of EtDC means that just about everyone and their grandma can learn to play. Each player is encouraged to read out the chapter card they draw and are written in an old sword and sorcery style.

Quick as you like Pace

They say that the game takes 2 minutes to setup and around 30 minutes to play. I disagree with the 30 minutes but only because the game can be played as quickly or as slowly as you like. We’ve played many games of EtDC and frankly, when you’re sat around a table in a dimly lit room, the atmosphere suggests you take it slowly… but as you near the last chapter card, the pace quickens… almost as if you’re running blindly through a dark castle and can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Social, Inclusive, Cooperative

This is a game for everyone (assuming they can read, and even then, others can help). Because it is truly a cooperative game, where everyone or no one is a winner, it’s very easy to get involved. Who draws the next card can be decided democratically, people can look at the state of their character and think: I can’t survive another round of fighting! Others will openly declare that they can take whatever happens next, effectively ‘taking one for the team’ so there’s room for limelight too.

The inclusion of ‘equipment’ cards adds an extra dimension to the escapees: who will take the rusted sword, or who needs to eat the stale bread?

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Even Grandma can learn to play…

Variety

There are 45 chapter cards in the basic game, of which 11 are randomly drawn to create each story. The chances of drawing the same 11 cards each time are so astronomically low that you’d have to play thousands of games to get an exact same combination. But worry not, there are several expansions already out for EtDC and each one adds even more chapter cards, end of game bosses and even starting cards to the story. Cult of the Death Knight, Scourge of the Undead Queen and Blight of the Plaguelord are great additions, each one bringing more themes and story to your escape.

Value

With 3 expansions, a collector’s box, play mat, card sleeves, a book of character deaths (I know, right?) a story book and even an 80’s style musical cassette you’d be forgiven for thinking that the prices are going to match the likes of Fantasy Flight Games. Except that they’re not.

The Core game is priced at £30 – and this is truly all you need. The expansions, which you could buy several years down the line, are priced at £15 each and everything else is £20 or less, depending on what you want – Themeborne have made a great little game that is affordable and so re-playable you’ll never get to experience every possible combination of game.

And now they’re going a step further and taking us into the timeless void of space, where no one can hear you scream…

Escape the Dark Sector!

Escape the Dark Sector

ETDS Logo

Escape the Dark Sector is a science-fiction adventure, pitting the beleaguered crew of a ship against a detention block space station. Again, if anyone dies, the game is over, presumably because the ship can’t be flown without a full crew!

Themeborne suggest that the story and game-play comes from popular science fiction of the 80’s, including Alien, Startrek and Star Wars combined with the literary adventures of the amazing Fighting Fantasy novels and classic Dungeons & Dragons – much like Escape the Dark Castle!

Whether you like all of those titles or not, it seems there is something for everyone.

What’s different?

The core storytelling concepts from EtDC still run through Dark Sector, but Themeborne have introduced several new and easy to learn mechanics to the game and its setup. They make sense too, creating cinematic shootouts with aliens. So what’s new?

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

The Setup

The characters are familiar to those who played EtDC – each character has a dice specific to them to roll during actions and combat. However, adding onto the basic character concepts, players can choose ‘cybernetic implants’ which give their characters an edge in certain situations.

The story aspect has been developed to include not one single stack of story chapters and instead is now made up of three acts which, we’re told ups the tempo and intensity the deeper into the escape story the players drive their characters.

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

The Gameplay

Since the theme of Dark Sector has catapulted the story into space, so too has the technology level, introducing tactical combat actions and  ranged combat.

Tactical combat actions include shooting, charging, reloading. re-equipping, and flanking, giving the game a much more tactical feel without detracting from the flow of the game. As is the way of Themeborne games, the action to charge is carried over for each character, meaning when one of you declares a charge, everyone has to go with them! It’s all or nothing!

Further, the action to heal some wounds can only be taken by one character at a time. No one gets to sit out for more than a round either. This seems to have upped the challenge! To balance this, certain actions such as reload or flank mean your character is not targeted by the enemy, but at least one character has to choose to fight or shoot. Actions come in the form of cards, where the character dice are placed in order to keep track more easily.

Ranged combat involves equipment and dice specifically related to the weapons, which, we’re told are not always positive effects for the characters. They seem to include ballistic, beam and explosive symbols, so no doubt each one comes with risks!

Some monsters and enemies are affected by or deal special damage depending on the type of ranged attack being made, so teamwork is still at the centre of the game mechanics – pile it up together or decide who should be shooting what weapon and you’ll crack the chapter and be able to move on!

If you want a copy of Escape the Dark Sector you’ll need to back the Kickstarter, there’s less than 40 hours left! Otherwise you can wait for the official release online, sometime next year!

Alternatively, you can grab yourself a copy of Escape the Dark Castle!

You can find the Kickstarter here

Themeborne website and shop

@FerrisWrites for Twitter and our Facebook page.

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – How Times Change.

It has been a while since my last article, but not to worry, Eve hasn’t beaten me yet.

 

The corporation has been steadily growing in organisational strength – there is a certain time where you realise that your endeavour must evolve from a fun little side project to one that will require a ton more time, I think now is that point.

Space hauler ship corp beginner new bro eve

I also trained into my first tier 2 ship! Not a super amazing combat ship; oh, no. It’s a hauler, which I found very amusing. I definitely have to prioritise the corp and ease of transport over shiny ships. I also recently trained into a tier 3 – which I was very surprised to find out aren’t necessarily better than tier 2 ships, they just have some funky features that allow them to be flexible. I only found out when it completed training however, that I trained into the wrong ship when setting up my skill queue – not such a bad thing when you have no idea what you’re doing!

Space fighter ship tier 3 eve online beginner corp wormhole

We began our journey in a Class 2 wormhole with very slim pickings when it came to neighbours, loot and things to do. It also didn’t help that we were besieged by another corporation for a solid week, which hit morale hard at a time when we were trying to really build up and organise.

 

However, after those hard few weeks, we made the move to a different wormhole which has a lot more to offer us in terms of profitability, fun and interesting neighbours and an element of secrecy and protection. Honestly it feels nice to finally call ourselves a Wormhole Corp.

Eve online base astrahus citadel corp wormhole beginner new

I am still trying to find more time to play, but that will come if I stay dedicated. I have had some of the most fun experiences in my gaming career with Eve and it’s all thanks to starting EternalCosmicBeardCorp.

 

The plan going forward is to set up some passive income with planetary interaction, start organising fleet ops and roams, form a cohesive doctrine for multiple situations, but most importantly to recruit some new Beards!

 

If you want a place to hang out and have some fun in this insanely complicated game, ECBC is a newbro and casual friendly Corp that emphasises the fact that we are all learning this together. We have some amazing people who are incredibly patient and we’re working on multiple guides to allow you to get to where you want to be as quick as possible.

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game beard corp corporation

Also, our little community is very accepting, we all love just chatting about stupid things. A sense of humour is a must – we also have just implemented authentication by ESI, so keep that in mind, oh and please do have a working mic. We operate in the EU/US Time Zone.

 

We want you to undock with us, get scanning and get killing! We’re all in this together, and we’re all here to make Eve fun.

 

If you’re interested, hop on over to the discord and we can have a good chat:

 

https://discord.gg/nzsBfuW

 

Until next time,

 

Fly Safe.

 

Lizard – CEO

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – Growing Pains.

I think I’m getting this game; finally. When you first start playing, everything is so overwhelming that you become so sure that it’s almost impossible to know enough to fulfill the criteria in your head that would lead you to class yourself as “competent” – it’s as unattainable in those first few weeks as flapping your arms and flying to the moon.

 

Then, when you surround yourself with good people and put the time into fitting ships and getting blown up again and again but learning, then you start to see how things fit together, how you need a fleet composed of specific ships to do specific things if you want to beat actual people. Fighting NPCs is similar, but the human is the most fierce prey, ha.

 

We have a good number of people in the corporation now, to the point where I think we’re done with the first round of recruitment: let’s see how many of our amazing people can deal with my sub-par leadership to make it to phase two! Which shall be kicking off in little more than a month.

 

The project is going a lot smoother than I expected; the whole idea was to get people playing the game, interacting and having fun without a strict corp structure and scheduling – these things will still exist for events and fleet ops etc, but I have no interest in enforcing lots of imaginary rules in an imaginary game.

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Other than that, we’re staring at our skill queue, waiting for doctrine ships to train so we can all go ratting as a fleet and rake in the monies.

 

Just a quick update for a standard week in the life of a know-nothing CEO. Until next time, fly safe.
Boboko Busanagi of EternalCosmicBeardCorp.

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – We Moved To A Wormhole.

Last week feels like a world away compared to where I am now with Eve. It’s safe to say that I’ve learned more than I ever have in this game during that time.

So, the previous article was published when our corporation had two members exploring relic sites in null sec. Eight days after that article went live, we now have around ten people and now own a base in a wormhole system.

Eve new start corp wormhole play 16 anniversary

Here’s the story; me and Lane Davaham – my second in command – talked about wanting to move into wormhole space to try and make some money or learn how to play this mysterious game by dying until we didn’t die anymore. I wanted to make my own Corp because I like being able to decide what is fun for me and what I want to do, with the hope being that I can assemble a cadre of like minded individuals and we can move forward together.

The corp was almost a joke, and designed with humour in mind; this place is lighthearted and laid back in the extreme and I wanted that to be our guiding focus.

I also received a ton of advice from experienced people who had run corps before, all of their advice amounted to “Don’t do this, you will fail.” Which is fine, and frankly expected. Failure is always an option during projects like these, but i find that if you’re honest about your expectations and your abilities then things tend to work out.

Eve new start corp wormhole play 16 anniversary

Then another person got in touch and offered to sell us a base in wormhole space for a relatively cheap price. We jumped on the offer and within two days we had control transferred over and both of us were sitting inside our own base just wondering how we got here.

Since then, we have begun to build a solid core of experienced players who constantly surprise me with their patience while I ask a million questions and try to learn everything I need to, to be able to give this place a chance to succeed.

We’re currently hauling ships into our system to hand over to new players when they join and hopefully give them some guidance on how to fit and fly their ships so anyone who is new can at least go out there and feel like they are playing the game correctly.

Eve new start corp wormhole play 16 anniversary

Going forward we will be trying to make some isk (I have been told staying profitable in wormhole space is near impossible) and have some fun. Many fleets will be formed in the coming days in pursuit of explosions; be they ours or our enemies!

In short; Eve Online hasn’t beaten me yet, in fact at the moment we’re going from strength to strength with the aid of some incredibly helpful and generous people; not just with their isk, but also their patience and capacity to withstand the barrage of ignorance and questions leveled at them from their know-nothing CEO.

EternalCosmicBeardCorp is currently recruiting! Our mission statement is evolving as we evolve, and I suppose that’s the message I need to get across: it’s going to be a long road, but we’ve taken our first steps and have not yet fallen on our face – we want to keep this game fun, for new and experienced players alike, and I honestly believe it’s the people involved that will make that happen. So come along and have a chat, you’ll be welcome.

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We’re determined to stay laid back, determined to have fun and determined to fail and learn. The ECBC way.

Our public channel in Eve: EternalBeardChat

Our discord: https://discord.gg/nzsBfuW

Link to last week’s article: https://creatorconsortium.com/2019/04/27/eve-online-will-not-beat-me-i-lost-200-million-isk-this-week/

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – I Lost 200 Million Isk This Week.

I lost 200 million isk this week. That might sound a lot – to some it’s truly just a drop in the bucket; to me it’s a big chunk of change, but the lessons I learned while losing it were incredibly valuable. Let’s talk about happier things first.

 

We’ve had a couple of people join the corp! Which is awesome. We’re working out the kinks and trying to really figure out what we want to do. Lane Davaham; our chief navigator convinced me to go exploring in wormhole space, which opened my eyes to a whole new side of Eve.

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game

You can make a lot of money in wormholes, just scanning down anomalies and doing relic sites, which is all my PvP hybrid astero is equipped for. i think I started to average around 40 million per hour, which, with more time spent skilling up, will increase steadily.

 

The plan is to start killing NPC ships in combat or sleeper sites and salvaging all their goodies. To do this, I need to buy a far more expensive ship. To understand why I am nervous about that, I need to confess my acts of stupidity for the week.

 

We came across a relic site in a C3 wormhole that had 3 cruisers and 3 frigate NPCs in it. I, not knowing the first thing about combat in Eve, said to my corpmate “I can take them”. I was wrong. I was really testing whether I could lure each ship away one by one, which might give me a fighting chance, but not understanding effective distances in the game proved my undoing as they all immediately pounced on me, killed my velocity and my ability to warp, then exploded me in under a minute.

 

You’d think I’d learn, right? Well, a few days later I’m hauling 40 million worth of relic loot and think “just one more site”. Sure enough, NPC sleepers are present, but there’s one relic box quite far away from the mass of enemies. My plan is to approach the box, align away from the enemies and gun it while deactivating my cloak to see if they could target me at that distance.

 

What actually happened is that I got too close to the box, it decloaked me before I was ready and they exploded me in under a minute. Oh well.

 

Now I’m thinking of either just knuckling under and making my money back while training into better and better ships, or taking the plunge on a Stratios (Cloaky cruiser which is more versatile, tanky and pew pew, but slower) or just buy one now and see how It works out with a fit I can use with the skills I have.

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game

I know it’s going to explode. I just hope the increased price (almost 300 mil after fitting it) will make me more cautious and i’m able to fight some sleepers in C2 wormholes to support my exploring corpmates.

 

EternalCosmicBeardCorp is currently recruiting. Our focus is to make Eve fun and to introduce new players to activities that make them feel part of the game and part of something new and exciting. We’re all learning this thing together, whether old or new. There will be many challenges along the way, but this is a wonderful game that presents so many opportunities for meaningful experiences.

 

No drama. No pettiness. Going forward with a will to accept failure and to learn; with fun as our goal.

 

That is our motto, and the Beardly way.

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game beard corp corporation

Discord link for ECBC: https://discord.gg/nzsBfuW

 

Fly save ya dinguses. O7

ECBC Logo by @smidgedraws on instagram.

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me.

I’ve been an Eve Online player for over ten years. I’ve had two separate accounts on two separate occasions. I’ve been part of corporations with thousands of members and participated in fleet battles where space station-sized ships owned by players have warped in while I goggled in surprise and wonder. I’ve plumbed the depths of player owned space on my own, under the noses of others in better equipped ships with far more skill at the game; hunting for secret relics and hidden caches of valuable items, all while frantically looking over my shoulder for player hunters and occasionally running for my life when they found me.

eve online space station new player

There’s a lot to do in Eve and I’ve done a lot of it, but I can honestly say that I have never understood the game.

 

It’s such a strange experience because it’s such a vast experience. The game is played with everyone all being on the same server. The mostly player-run economy means that you can make a living doing anything you want: mining, salvaging, battling, exploring, war with other players and much more. You undock from a station and every time you are confronted by everything and it’s so intimidating, even for a gamer like me who has spent hundreds of hours grappling with Dwarf Fortress.

 

The menus in Eve are complicated, the combat, the movement, the player interaction; everything presents you with numbers and ratios and systems with nested subsystems and to be competitive you absolutely need to atleast understand them.

eve online mining new

 

This is what keeps bringing me back and also what keeps me away. There are no amount of tutorials that can prepare you for what awaits as the game eventually spits you out and says “go and do stuff”. It’s a profoundly baffling experience if you’re on your own.

 

Ofcourse, guides tell you again and again to join a player group, or “Corp” and yes, it’s true that this is by far the best approach to learning the game if you are confident enough. But if you’re not, or you feel like your schedule won’t match up with others, or any number of reasons why you might not want to join a player group while you’re still learning the game, then Eve won’t hold your hand. You’ll need to read and read a lot.

 

But for all that, you can’t ever get away from the fact that you’re playing a true space sim, set in a living and breathing universe where real humans go about their tasks with goals and ambitions. There are pirates and danger around every corner. Real intrigue between real people who head huge organisations who run regular missions with real goals. What other game ever made can boast that level of persistence and completeness? The immersion is both minimal, as you tab out or grab your phone every five minutes to check up a rule, or stat, and simultaneously tremendous as you desperately try and lose a pirate who wants nothing more than to kill you and take your stuff.

eve online pirate hunter new player how

The game is about control and Eve puts everything and the kitchen sink into your hands and says “tell me what you’re going to do with it”. Even playing the game is a challenge that you must overcome, and who every player also logged in either has or is still in the process of overcoming. What a unique thing to be a part of.

 

So take your WoWs, your Guild Wars, your Fortnites. I need Eve. In the articles that will follow, I shall hopefully bring you all the trials and tribulations of a Newbro trying to make it in a big universe.

 

To be continued,
Boboko Busanagi, CEO of EternalCosmicBeardCorp. (We’re new, and recruiting!)