Tag Archives: dungeons and dragons

The Future Of Pulp RPG And You.

Good day nerdy people!

We here at CreatorConsortium have been having a jolly old time of it recently, with many things having been discussed on how we want to proceed with the site and tons of late night development sessions. Mr Ferris and myself are so passionate about roleplay games that I think it’s safe to say that we think about them daily. There really is nothing like rolling some dice and making some memories with people you love, which is why in addition to the articles covering all manner of Nerdery, we will be focusing our efforts more on the game we are developing and just cannot stop thinking about.

So as you know, we have been working on our home grown tabletop RPG system: Pulp. The idea behind it is to create a simple and approachable core roleplay system that anyone can pick up and play in literally minutes, then with the addition of rulesets and setting expansions, you can introduce as much or as little complexity as you want. The focus is on allowing everyone to roleplay and giving the GM the tools to be able to take an active hand in the game. Combat is collaborative, forcing both player and GM to talk back and forth about how situations flow. The most important part, though, is that it is so fun!

A link to our first audio Devlog!

What we really wanted to get away from was extensive tables and lists of rules filling entire books, pushing combat and time-sensitive moments into hour long slogfests where you’re checking your sourcebook every five minutes. While we still appreciate and love these rule-heavy systems, like Pathfinder Na D&D, we think that you can still have a satisfying and engaging ruleset while conserving as much time for roleplay as possible!

So in comes Pulp RPG; over the next few months, (the holiday season pushes everything back) we will be focusing our efforts on building a community around our game. We told you about our first adventure pack: Chasing Hitler Through Panama In 1948, this standalone adventure will soon be released alongside the Pulp Beta Core Rules V1.0, both free.

Indepth article on Pulp’s progress.

We hope to use these two powerful little documents to get people playing our game and giving us much needed feedback while we plunge into our first large and sprawling Campaign Pack: The Godless Realm, which will add a host of new mechanics to use in a fully fleshed out and dynamic fantasy setting, filled with treacherous gods and plenty of thrilling battles to fight.

We urge you to head on over to our discord and give us a holler; we’re always ready to talk about Pulp RPG, and I personally will be trying to put a game of Pulp together with anyone willing.

https://discord.gg/PGj8yYS

Happy gaming!

J.A.Steadman.

How to Write Single Session Adventures for RPGs (with examples)

Whether you’re new to RPGs like D&D or you just want a fresh perspective as a veteran, we’ve got some suggestions to creating a single session adventure in a couple of hours (which, over a week isn’t that long at all when you think about it).

Writing a whole campaign for table top role-play games like Dungeons & Dragons can be daunting, especially if you’re new to the role of games master (GM) or dungeon master (DM). It doesn’t need to be difficult, which is why I’m setting out how to write a single session adventure and how make it a worthy story!

Definition

A single session adventure takes place for a single gaming session – usually around 3 hours or an evening of game play. It is designed to resolve itself by player interaction at the end of the session, allowing the players to move their characters on. It is a great way to introduce yourself as a new GM to the game because the effort involved is minimal compared to writing a full campaign. That said, extra credit for proper design such as maps and non-playing characters really helps!

Single session adventures need to be concise, so some of the work the GM has to undertake can be a bit more intense: the game needs to start succinctly, the players need to be hooked in right from the start and the game needs to build up to the end smoothly.

I’m going to be running with an adventure example so you can see how it builds up. If you’re lucky I’ll throw in some diagrams to explain what I’m talking about.

Note: I’m not writing this with any game system in mind, although I’ll use generic fantasy elements like those found in D&D. The advice and technique should apply to just about any setting or game.

First Step: The Facts

Identify what the facts are in your adventure – this is the most creative part of the design stage because what you’re doing is setting the plot. The players don’t need to know these facts – it is their job to find the clues and put the pieces of the puzzle together much like a murder mystery show. The clues culminate into the facts and then there is a resolution, in games like Dungeons & Dragons this is normally the second to last encounter: facing the enemy.

Look on the facts of your adventure like the synopsis of a story or a film. It needs to be only be a line or two at most.

Example fact: A Hag is living near a village and has sleep-charmed one or more of the villagers to kidnap young children and take them to her grotto where she devours them or uses them in dark rituals to proliferate her coven. Travellers have also gone missing in the night, leaving all of their belongings behind in the small village inn.

From this simple factual synopsis, we have the antagonist of our story, the method and locations of their actions and finally a reason as to why – creating her own coven of hangs or witches.

Second Step: The Clues & Encounters

A single session adventure should have no more than 3-4 key encounters where the players are able to discover clues. Clues are simple bits of information that, when combined with other clues point the finger or give a direction for the players to investigate further, leading to the showdown encounter which is the resolution. Clues do not have to be combat engagements – your players will be playing different characters with different skills and abilities and you are going to want to provide something for everyone in some of your encounters. Each clue should involve a different style of play for accommodate skills and abilities. This is a story, not a series of fights.

Here’s a diagram showing ways you can organise your clues to make the adventure coherent to you and your players. It is not a comprehensive diagram, but covers the basics which should be more than enough for your single session adventure:

clues for resolutions

Route 1 is linear and fair for first time players. Route 2 starts with the first clue, requiring at least clue two or three to be discovered before heading to the final resolution. Route 3 implies that any clue may lead to the end resolution. Personally, Route 2 is my chosen style as it gives the players a natural feel for the progression of the plot and doesn’t lead right to the resolution after a single clue.

Examples clue encounters

I’ve picked four clues which the players may encounter.

The first clue is that a child vanished in the night from the family’s log cabin. The players can investigate the cabin and realise that there are no signs of forced entry, and under questioning the parents, the bar to the front door was still in place in the morning. Rogue like characters, or trap masters will enjoy setting up their own traps to see where the thief comes from, or analysing the events, possibly suspecting the parents (which is true, but the parents are not aware of their actions).

The second clue is that the elders of the village have been having dreams where they have taken up their young ones and carried them through the forest in the dead of night, to a stone altar where a beautiful woman waits in a strange scant clothing, a tall horned figure lingers in her shadow, never quite realised clearly. Stone altars, strange large creatures and witch-like individuals should inspire the lore masters and religious or cult focused characters.

The third clue involves tracking bare footprints that lead from the village into the forest. Outdoor characters and hunters / trackers will enjoy finding clues such as broken branches or torn clothing (matching the villagers nightwear). Nature characters such as druids will likely notice that the fauna of the forest is very quiet, and that there is evidence of corruption in the flora: leaves are slightly yellowed, new growth is not as vibrant or strong.

The fourth clue is optional, as the players may not try to set up a watch and see if another child or traveller goes missing. This clue / encounter should lead the party into the thick of the forest where the hag will be awaiting her sacrifice. The players will likely forcibly engage the hag, who will make her escape and let the horned figure do her fighting. Tracking the hag from here will lead to the final resolution.

If you feel the party is going too fast, you can include some other encounters as red herrings – bandits camped nearby the main road, wandering monsters which, once dealt with, turn out not to be the culprit!

You should write short introduction paragraphs for each area which gives the details the players need to start investigating. Use the clues you have already written to help you with this. My example is attached to the first clue – clues two and three can probably fit into the map of the village we’ve already given to the players.

“The abandoned cabin sits in shadow, empty of life. The door has been flung open, the bar that held it shut discarded on the floor. From the outside, the various windows have remained closed, firmly held shut by their wooden bars. Inside is cold, hidden away from sunlight and without a fire to keep the house dry. The three rooms are separated by door frames covered in heavy fabrics. The beds are disturbed.”

From this description, your players will want to begin their investigation of the various rooms, asking you questions and poking around for more clues. In this instance, it is clear that the kidnapper did not force their way in, suggesting there is another way into the cabin (which there is not). After a thorough search the players will probably conclude that the kidnapper came from inside the house and may suspect the family – which is another intense encounter which can develop from the clue.

Third Step: Draw the Players In

This is often referred to in RPGs as the plot hook – the device you use to draw the players in and make them want to participate in the adventure. For longer games that last several sessions you can play on plot hooks by enticing players one at a time, but in single sessions you can’t afford to spend the time tailoring the hook for each character.

This is usually the last step for me, as don’t often use personal character hooks (my players are pretty good at that themselves). Arguably this step could be the first or last for many GMs – it’s all down to how you feel about it.

Start the game by asking their characters why they are on the road or why they may be in the village. Take no more than 5 minutes to round this information up. If you have completely new players, you’ll want to do this before the gaming session.

You’ll find that some players are quite good at giving you a little bit of character plot themselves – likely they will provide you some of their own motivation.

Fourth Step: Extra Credits

Maps will be essential to the players immersion for a single session game. Keep them simple: a map of the village will suffice as a centerpiece for the gaming table or space. Make it larger than it needs to be so the players can add to it as they explore or learn about points of interest from the locals – particularly the outdoor type characters, your Rangers, Druids, Hunter etc.

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Have a dungeon, by all means, but keep it small, maybe 4-6 areas in said dungeon at most. Again, add elements that will give each class or character type something to play with to utilise their abilities such as traps, moral obligations, conundrums, and obviously monsters and bad-guys.

Have a two tailed ending. This is where the clues may allow for different approaches to affect the resolution of the adventure. This could be helping one faction over the other, using a faction to thwart the other or toppling both factions at once. In order for this to happen, consider two or more factions where one is a definite enemy, and the others as possible enemies.

In our current example, one of the townsfolk may have control of the hag, perhaps they hold a fetish which stop the hag from killing them, and so they use the hag for their own agenda, perhaps they suffered at the hands of the villagers years ago and now have an avenue for their revenge. You’ll need to edit your primary fact from your first step.

Fifth Step: Running the Game, Pacing and Rhythm

You should start the gaming session from this point and describe the setting to them from the outset. Leave no room for them to be in different places or occupied with other events unless you can trust the players to come together quickly. I’ve including an example opening description, feel free to use it as a template.

‘Winter in the northern reaches comes sharply this time of year and is unforgiving to the lost and weary. You have been travelling through dark forests for several days. Seeing the first village in what seems like months, you happily head to the warm glow of fires. The village is quiet as occasional snowflakes fall silently. Well wrapped stragglers hurry indoors, some clutching babies close to their chests or dragging resisting children indoors. A single guard approaches holding a torch high to see you all clearly in the growing darkness. She carries a well service sword on her hip. “We don’t see travellers much here – we’re shunned,” she points to a large, scruffy two-story building in the centre of the village, ‘You’ll find rest there, but beware, people have gone missing in the night, locals and travellers alike. If it wasn’t for the coming blizzard, I’d tell you to keep walking.” She nods curtly and continues her patrol.’

In this opening, we set the scene: winter and cold, the characters should be seeking shelter. We give them a location, the village. Being dark, children and being called in, which seems normal at first. The guard, although taciturn doesn’t provide the mission as such, but she does lay the ground work, suggesting the village is not a highly regarded by outsiders and that people go missing. Finally, the players are told a blizzard is coming, so they will likely want to seek shelter and stay a while. Once the players are at the Inn, they can begin questioning the suspicious and untrusting locals, which is an encounter in itself and helps you set up the clues.

So, it is a bit cliché, but this is a working example which I hope gives you an idea of how to draw the players in without making it seem forced. Nothing kills the immersion that keeping your players rigidly in the story, you need them to feel like they want to stay and investigate.

So far, we have the clues, encounters and the plot hook to get the players drawn in. You’ve already got the meat of the adventure set out, now you need to add the garnishes and side orders.

And the last bit…

Keeping the flow of the game is vital for single session adventures. More than ever the party must not dawdle about, wondering where to go next – if they do, they’re eating into the valuable session time and need to get moving. My simple advice here is to keep the players active. If they don’t seem to be doing anything, for example in the evening of the first night at the Inn, then get them to commit to sleep or carry out an action.

If the players are stumped and are not sure what to do next, bring an encounter to them, but make them work for it – don’t spoon feed them! If the following morning they are sat outside wondering where to start, add a small encounter where another child has gone missing: a mother’s shriek. If they still don’t investigate, the villagers gather around the house and begin weeping – another child is missing and then they active ask the characters to help them investigate, which should lead them to the first clue.

There you have it –  a single session game planned out and underway in a couple of hours of work. If, like me, you get the odd 10 minutes here or there, jot down your ideas, add to them, let them grow.

If you give yourself a finite number of key encounters, the rest pretty much writes itself and you’ll be steaming ahead with tonnes of possible ideas, just waiting to be played!

That’s all for today!

We’ve been working hard on NaNoWriMo, Pulp RPG, adventures modules, proofing, editing and brainstorm, all whilst holding down full-time jobs. We’re getting there 😉

J.D Ferris, CC

The Awkward, the Bad and the Great – Dealing with the Players

It is often all down to the DM to run the game and make it a good one. There’s always the expectation that this game is going to be as good as the last one or better. It’s capitalism of the RPG world – they want more and more each session. But the game isn’t purely the responsibility of the DM; players are there too and the expectations of all involved should be considered.

The expectations of the players are more varied than we might think; some are there for the story, others for the thrill of the dice and fewer, thankfully, are there to roll dice and crunch the numbers like Scrooge on Tax Day. Unfortunately for you, as the DM, you have to balance all of these aspects, but you shouldn’t pander to them all – it’s your game too.

I’m going to assume that you play with people you know, that they are reasonable people. I expect there are unreasonable players out there – the internet is full of those stories, so I’ll touch on those style of players too.

This article is about the bad players, the awkward players, but also the good players – and we’ll cover how to deal with the bad ones, and encourage the good ones. But first, let’s talk about the ones that aren’t bad players, they’re just… awkward.

This is all my opinion, and you’re welcome to discuss them, share some stories of your own – we can only learn more.

human fist

The Awkward Ones

The awkward ones, like the Deep Ones, are often hidden at first. We may think that their first character is just a bit of a buffoon and that soon they’ll get into the story. Sadly however this will not always be the case; sometimes we see an Awkward One develop and we need to make sure they don’t derail the story accidentally, or otherwise.

slippery foot dangerous fall

Comedic or one-dimensional characters may seem like a little light relief the first time have a tendency to become habit for some players. The first time it’s all fun and there’s no problems, but often these players will see it as scoring social points for themselves; it will feel good for them and so the habitual pathology sets in, the player now thinking that funny = best game ever! Eventually this will ruin the flavour and immersion of the game.

How do you deal with this sort of situation? In my experience the best solution is tact. Quite often a player like this needs attention, which in itself is not a bad things; we all need attention sometimes, but for the comedic player, it feels new and good and they probably don’t realise.

Give them a bit of space to enjoy being comedic, but encourage wit and humour rather than outlandish and excessive. A quiet chat after the first session to explain to them that actually, yes it can be amusing, but the harmony of the game is broken by the ever increasing hair brained ideas. People will laugh, then chuckle, then get tired real quick of it. There’s no need to kick them out of the group, if they’re willing to keep their exaggerated theatrics in check. Promise to reassess the situation if they seem amenable to the idea.

police money finance funny

The DM who Hijacked your game thinks they know better or perhaps don’t realise they are not the focus of attention anymore. This is normally purely accidental; as DMs we can grow accustomed to the idea of being the focus of attention, since we run the game and very little interaction or action occurs without our help. This one is fairly simple, you call the shots for this game, don’t be bullied into changing your mind, unless of course the idea they put forward is sound.

Chatter boxes, or social annoyances, who talk about non game stuff and don’t know when to stop, potentially ruining the immersion and tension in the game. I tend to get this out of the system of players before the game starts by having a catch up chat, getting all the news out in the open and discussed before sitting everyone down. I also ask that all media that isn’t relevant to the game is taken away or turned off, or at least not in sight.

If it’s persistent, you can ask that player, politely and aside from the others at a later time, if they want to be there to play the game or just because their friends are there. It’s cool to hang out, but don’t detract from the fun of the game that we enjoy.

Showboaters just love the attention and want to get in on the action whenever they can. This isn’t bad for a game that needs a bit of life injected into it (especially if it has been a hard day at the office). What isn’t cool is overriding other players or butting in on their turns to act.

This is a hard juggle, but as DM you are justified to point out whose turn it is, and that if a player needs the showboaters help or advice, they can ask for it. Remember, we don’t want to cut off their enthusiasm, we just want to let them know that other players are entitled to the limelight too.

purple liquid poison on brown wooden surface

The Bad Ones

Before I get into the stereotypes of bad players, I’m going to talk about the nature of the conversation around your gaming table (or wherever). It is best to openly discuss with your players before you start playing what sort of behaviour you all find acceptable during the game and on the sidelines; I’m talking about racism and sexism, amongst others.

It is perfectly acceptable to have these as elements in the game, it is after all usually set in a backward or less liberal society than our own. For this reason, you should let people have a say in what they find comfortable. If it’s a no from them, it should be a no from you, and vice-versa. D&D is an inclusive and cooperative game, and relaxed participants make far better adventuring buddies!

If it does crop up during play, as the DM you should be able to tone it down and talk to the offenders after the game session to suggest they tighten up – it’s ok to hate another race of people in character, but it shouldn’t spill into the real world, the same applies for sexism. If it happens that either of these topics comes out into play and is directed player to player, rather than character to character, you must stop it right away. Call it out, quash it dead. You are the DM, and you run this game.

So, the Stereotypes…

Player stereotypes have come to be identified from the internet – the internet has given us names for the power gamers, the min/max’er, rules lawyer, and the metagamers. Before the internet (I know, was there ever such a time?) we just thought they were annoying players who happened to enjoy the same hobby, so we were delighted at having the new player along for the ride. How wrong we were!

I’ve run a good number of gaming groups beyond my primary group over the years, this is how I dealt with the unhelpful ones.

golden statue under blue skies during day time

Not to be confused with the player who creates an efficient or optimised character, the power-gamer and the Min/Max player are those who either have to have it all at the cost of nothing, or throw everything out of the window to maximise a single attribute, ability or power – and use it at every possible moment. Normally a maturity issue, or the feeling of helplessness in their real lives leads them to want to show the world that they can do the thing, and force it on every situation.

Dealing with these players can be tackled in two ways in my experience: critically evaluate any character sheet prior to your game, with time to allow for changes, or subject your players to constrained resources, for example, only character material from the core Player’s Handbook may be used. As much as I love unearthed arcana and supplemental material, they tend to promote niche ideas into the game which can feel over balanced. These players will then latch onto these cool ideas, and completely overplay them.

Rules Lawyers: Players who spend most of their game in the source material, or spend all their free time reading the books and remembering every single bit of detail are fine, even helpful, like little biological libraries you can call on just by asking. However, it is the ones who keeping calling you out as the DM for your mistakes or lax enforcement of the rules who are the problem. Nothing ruins a cool cinematic moment when the party are about to hit the jackpoint with an amazing idea when the Rules Lawyer calls a stop to the game with the immortal opening line “I think you’ll find…”

blur close up focus gavel

There are very simple ways to explain this or overcome the problem.

First, all the source books ever made for games like Dungeons & Dragons, every single one, are purely guidelines given the misnomer of rules. You, as the DM, are capable of overriding some of those rules now and again if you think it works or if you think for this occasion they can be fudged – heck, most of being a DM is fudging the rules to get the most out of player interactions.

Secondly, if you’re more diplomatic and want to avoid arguments in game, call upon your powers as a DM to completely override their opinion, but only with the promise to review the rules stated after the session and come to a compromise. Or, for this session only you can maintain your DM ruling, and endeavour to assess the rule for next time. Rules lawyers can be compromised with – if they don’t want that, then they are free to evaluate their expectations of your game. You’ll welcome them back with open arms if they wish to return.

Metagamers are those players who use information or knowledge beyond the scope of their character. Weirdly, if you’ve been playing D&D for decades, it is almost impossible to not metagame on some level. There are always repeat or extreme offenders though. It may seem like they’re just being lucky in their assumptions about that monster at first, but eventually you’ll realise that the metagamer is using his or her outside knowledge to influence their actions and maybe even the actions of others.

I deal with this foible in a few different ways: I can ‘reskin’ my monsters in their appearance or stats to keep the metagamer on their toes by describing monsters differently or altering their behaviour style and resistance qualities and combat abilities (which can get exhausting without proper planning). But what if the player is metagaming the plot or story?

Plot metagamers use their vast knowledge of fantasy and sci-fi to guess where your adventure story is going by relying on troupes, or popular fiction to base their predictions on. When this happens, it can be frustrating; the story is often the most creative part of the DM process. How did I deal with this? Well if you can’t avoid current popular stories from movies and fiction, I suggest you plan your adventures with an open ending – whatever the plan was, whoever is the bad guy, make them the second to last badguy, and put someone else who they’ve met previously as the badder bad guy.

Or tell them to get out. 😉

silhouette photography of group of people jumping during golden time

Good Players and Encouraging New Players

This is the nice, positive part to being the DM.

I’ll make this brief, but you get the idea:

Good players…

  • Role-play and encourage role-play from new and old players.
  • They go with the flow regarding your narrative choices and instead of sulking justify the response of their character to keep things going without selling out on their character.
  • They don’t argue with your choices but if they get really narked, they’ll talk to you about it after the session, like a grown-up.
  • They ask pertinent questions, sometimes thinking aloud and usually on their own turn.
  • They play balanced characters, even after 20 years of gaming and realise there’s more to the game than crunching the numbers.
  • Characters they create have flaws, and if they didnt at creation time, they relish the flaws that develop organically from the game – they don’t whine and resist when things go bad – its part of the game.
  • They don’t expect special treatment, but they enjoy their share of the stage lights.

Thoughts and opinions? I’m all ears!

J.D Ferris, CC

 

What do these 90’s games and Cthulhu Mythos (5th Edition) have in Common?

What do DOOM, Age of Empires, Quake, Sid Meier’s Pirates, Wolfenstein 3D, West End Games’ Ghostbusters RPG, Runequest, Games Workshop and Chaosism’s Call of Cthulhu  RPG all have in common?

(Apart from being awesome with childhood memories added on top!)

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Shooting Nazis was a preteen hobby before the internet…

It’s actually a guy called Sandy Petersen.

Apparently, a god, responsible for most of my childhood dreams, nightmares and a huge inspiration to the gaming community on and off the digital board. Since 1989 Petersen is credited with nearly 20 digital games, 6 board games (including Cthulhu Wars, a 3500% over-pledge success on Kickstarter), executive producer of a single film and the legendary Call of Cthulhu RPG (1981).

Not bad for a family guy and Mormon, eh?

The guy has worked in every game industry I was aware of as a much younger nerd, Micropose (remember them!) id Software (does anyone remember Commander Keen?) and finally Ensemble Studios.

And now the guy is combining some of my favourite things (which is yet to be identified as good or bad).

Want to play Call of Cthulhu but don’t want to deviate from the mainstream D&D engine?

Sure: it’s called Cthulhu Mythos and it’s set to be a grim and gritty lovechild of Dungeons & Dragons 5th edition fantasy and Call of Cthulhu, a grand re-imagining of an older Pathfinder edition.

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And it can be yours early if you’re willing to back the new Kickstarter project.

Boasting its funding goal in less than 30 minutes, it’s currently at £59K of its £7.5K target. And there’s still 19 days to go.

It’s a little pricier than some games, coming in at approximately £38 (not including the postage) but its default format is a swish-looking hardback book.

It is meant to be 400 pages of full colour horror, which is nice but it may take away some of that black and white charm you get with older editions of Call of Cthulhu by Chaosism.

But oh ye gods! Some of the new artwork is so finely detailed you can’t help but gawp in wonder!

But here’s some of the cooler bits:

There are rules (shall we say guidelines?) which allow you to play unusual races featured in the Cthulhu setting, rules for insanity and dreaming, which will hopefully blend much better than those found in the current Dungeon Masters Guide.

You can take a look at some of the content here in their free 25-page preview (it’s a lovely PDF format) with colour and stuff.

There’s even an option for miniatures if you’re the sort of gaming willing to pay for good models of stuff.

The Kickstarter is due to ship to backers in May / June time.

Exciting? Let us know!

Why you should be excited for Iskloft…

banner for iskloft

Low there do I see my father…

I tend to peruse Kickstarter often these days, and I think you’d benefit from checking in from time to time too. It’s because of the amazing games that people are bringing to us…

I’m excited for Iskloft, a ‘brutal, low fantasy, Viking themed 5th Edition campaign.’

I’m reading it as D&D meets players as spongy sacks of leaky meat?

steak meat raw herbs
Mmmm… meaty… Photo by mali maeder on Pexels.com

Iskloft is the blood spattered, one-eyed wild-child of Lloyd Collins, teacher and theatre director from Ireland who runs JarlDM on Youtube.

Now, if you take a look at the Kickstarter, it looks pretty small…

It’s secured just over 21K euros with less than 600 backers. But here’s the beauty of it, it doesn’t cost a heinous amount of cash to get a copy (at least for now). For 35 euros I’ve secured a hardback copy complete with pdf (so we can play around the table). This is a small but mighty game, and here’s why…

The artwork; it’s just the right balance between detailed depictions and abstract colours. Dominic Mayer and Brandish Gilhelm have really brought the vibrant reality of this world setting to life; check out some of their artwork featured on the Kickstarter project page…

Iskloft seems to be boasting about its unique spell system, which draws its inspiration from historical texts based on the Norse sagas, involving complex rituals and heavy folklore. I’m in!

We also think it’s going to be a different power dynamic to the likes of other 5th edition games – wandering through dangerous places means likely encounters with dangerous beasts. This isn’t a D&D bear attack, prepare to get owned by angry mammals!

I’m keen to see what this game will be like.

It is about time that I subjected my players to some serious Norse tutelage!

So You Want to Try Dungeons & Dragons? (Here’s how to do it on the Cheap!)

So You Want to Try Dungeons & Dragons?

Maybe you’ve seen it on TV – that archaic game of nerds and socially-challenged teens across the world? You’ve wondered what it’s all about and thought to yourself (secretly, so the jocks don’t hear) ‘I may like to try that one day.’

Dungeons and mother-fucking Dragons, y’all! (I’m not southern (not even American)).

But you’ve spotted the price of those books, all three of the core ones (Players Handbook, Dungeon Masters Guide, Monster Manual – there’s a lot of extras). The cheapest was once £25 but now they’re all £30-£50 apiece. Your lips just opened and your jaw dropped like it was made of stone – that’s one hell of a financial outlay to try something you may not even enjoy! And you need some specific dice that look like the Devils pocket torture-kit to play!

Well, worry not my closet-nerd; I’m here with some really simple advice and tips. You’ll be playing sooner than you thought!

First of all, come down from that citadel of solitude and ask around your friends if they know anyone who plays Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) already. Three things may happen; no one looks at you again for daring to be cool; they have no idea; they know a guy who knows a guy; they want to try too!

OK so that was four things, but I discount the first one because D&D is more popular than you think and a lot of people are in the closet about it.

If you have a social link to people who already play, ask if you can join them. You could ask to just watch but D&D is not a spectator sport and many gamers may feel a little uncomfortable with you gawping at them – it’s also not a sport. D&D is best experienced from within the game. Throw yourself in and you’ll surprise yourself!

But I’m guessing you have no idea who else plays and online games can be so hit and miss that the target hasn’t been changed since the internet grew up. No game stores in your local area? Well damnation, you live on an island, population = 1.

So, if you can find at least two other friends who may like to try it out, I’m going to give you a really simple and cheap way of checking it out!

You’re already reading this on the internet so follow this links to the Wizards of the Coast website (I know right; Wizards… of the Coast? Paha!)

http://dnd.wizards.com/articles/features/basicrules

Got dice? Well, if you can afford a set of those, you’ll need a set of polyhedral dice. There are more varieties of dice than there are species of beetles (OK – not true) but there’s dice to suit anyone’s 80’s acid induced dreams!

You can spend anything from £4 up to… well, how much money can you think of?

OK, but let’s say you want to start right now! Well, if you need to, there are random dice number generators online – they aren’t ideal but helpful when you’re desperate. I recommend you get yourself a set of dice covering 4 to 20 sided dice:

All you need now are pencils, some pads of paper and the desire to create epic, fantastical memories together! (I’m going to guess you have those already…)

If you need help understanding the game in more detail, drop me a line and I’ll work on a How-to just for you!

Ferris

A Great Journey.

Welcome to The Creator Consortium. Not just a website; this place will become a centre of creative energy over the next few weeks as the team here start to populate the site with snapshots of the work we’re so desperate to show you. Projects from our past mixed with fresh content just for the site; we’re going to be bringing you short stories, articles about what we love including all aspects of nerdery, roleplaying game adventures, boardgame writeups, reviews and much much more.

We hope to expand this endeavour into many new spaces and bring our creators together in videos, streams and podcasts. The goal is to let the creators talk to you and share what they are passionate about so you can watch them, and us, grow.

The future of this enterprise has us very excited because we’re not just doing this for ourselves; we want to foster a community so we can share our experiences into the future and create many amazing new ones.

Goodbye for now.

J.A.Steadman and J.D.Ferris,

Cofounders.