Tag Archives: blogging

NaNoWriMo 2018: Woah-oh We’re Half Way There.

And so the sun rises on another day, and I realise that I’ve not been so productive or learned so much about my writing in many a year, for that I am grateful to NaNoWriMo. I’m really happy that I started this journey and am confident that I will finish, and that I will have a real body of work that I will be happy with at the end of it.

By now, if you are following along, you should be about half way through your story. I’d say I am definitely half way through and can present an ending, but I’m definitely feeling like I should be further along in the narrative, even though not a lot has happened really. I suppose that is a symptom of this challenge only being 50k words, which is very short for any sort of real story.

If you’re riding high on momentum, keep doing what you’re doing. If you’re floating in the doldrums, hardly hitting your targets, or even staring down the barrel of a few 3000 word days, then just look at what you’ve done so far, appreciate that every word is another step to achieving your goals, and knuckle down to get this done.

Good luck, all. See you in another 10k words.

 

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Pulp RPG Leaves Pre-Alpha.

Over the last few weeks, we here at CreatorConsortium have been hard at work developing our Tabletop Roleplaying Game, dubbed Pulp RPG. This process has been a ton of fun for everyone here as we’ve really had the time and opportunity to nail down what we want to achieve with the game, so it’s with pride that we announce that Pulp has left the Pre-Alpha stage within one month of it’s inception.

We’ve always loved RPGs and regularly run and participate in many and varied games. Pulp RPG is the culmination of both the experience we feel we’ve gained in analysing what makes these kinds of games fun, but also our frustrations with what we see as bloated, monolithic systems that lack dynamism and the scope to let the players along with the GM focus on the roleplay, and indeed let it flow organically into the mechanics and vice versa.

This is why we have created Pulp RPG. Our first play test happened recently and really energised the whole development process, as we saw first hand how fun and different Pulp felt. We are so happy with how we’ve really nailed down the features we wanted while allowing ourselves plenty of room to grow and adapt to any player or GM with our modular development model.

You see, pulp isn’t just one system, it’s a simple, simple scaffolding that allows you to be able to build any story you want inside a genuinely fun, crunchy system which will grow with you. We have a huge opportunity to build intricate settings that span centuries, all connected by modules and eras, otherwise known as Content Packs, every one of which will be bursting with all the tools and rules you need to set up a fully fledged Pulp RPG game in any setting.

The last thing we must stress is just how easy Pulp is to play. You only need one six-sided die, the Free rules, one A4 sheet of paper and a pencil. We believe that we’re going to be the easiest Tabletop RPG to go from never knowing the game to rolling some dice and swinging a sword, while of course cursing the fickle hand of fate.

I hope you’ll join us in raising a glass on this, the first in many milestones!

If you are interested in following the development, be sure to check out the very first Devlog Podcast, where creators J.D.Ferris and J.A.Steadman dissect the first play test:

THE DEVS PLAY THE FIRST EVER SESSION OF CC’S NEW GAME: PULP RPG.

Or you can keep in touch with us directly on the discord. We’re a new site, which means people who connect with us early on will have a direct line to all the latest news and insight on our projects(and maybe get a copy of the pre-alpha rules, if you nag us.):

CreatorConsortium Discord.

NaNoWriMo Update: 10000 words.

We’re about a fifth of the way through the challenge now, and it’s already been an interesting learning experience for me as a writer. When I began the challenge, I was coming at it from a place of weakness, I hadn’t written much fiction in the last year, that’s one of the reasons I wanted to do it; to get myself back on the horse.

Well as I approached my new book, I felt that I needed to change my style and approach if I was going to hit my word count every day. (Which I have.) In the past I heavily edited my prose as I wrote it, referring to extensive notes and altering paragraphs to make sense in the context of later ones.

It’s only now that I realise how bad of an idea that is when you consider the whole body of work. My new approach is to just furiously write the prose, being careful to leave mental markers outlining the intent of my story as I go, for example: making sure to mention any sort of conflict going on between two characters, but don’t feel the need to expound on it in detail; hint to a shadow in someone’s past so I know, reading through it later in the editing stage, that I must give a little more information on it.

This approach allows me to really keep pushing these buttons on this keyboard instead of staring at the screen. I am also going to write a body of notes at the end of each week, to give me a reference guide to the lore and any mental markers I need to keep in my head as we go.

The most important thing is to keep writing. Whatever stage of the process you’re at, you can do this! It might seem a herculean effort, but it’s just one day at a time.

Until next time; go and write!

If you’re interested in chatting to the team here at CC, hop on over to the discord. We’re trying to create a community and we need all the nerds we can get!

Discord  Link: https://discord.gg/PGj8yYS

Literary Devices Part 4 – Dialogue techniques and capturing fictional realism

NaNoWriMo started today! Hu-rarrgh! So let’s get down to business, because I know for a fact you’re just taking a break from smashing today’s word goal, and research counts, right?

Today we’ll be looking at dialogue and how dialogue not only gives your characters depth and well, character, but also helps you advance the plot of your story.

I’m going to split this episode into two sections; literal advice on dialogue and then characterisation, which is a deeper and heavier topic which I will touch on.  I won’t cover grammar here because that is a lesson all of its own, but I’ll include some links for you to look at.

Dialogue is the verbal interaction between two or more characters which your reader is privy to. If the character is talking alone, we call it a monologue. Both of these are useful as writing techniques and I’ll cover a few interesting ideas soon. First, I want to show you an example of how dialogue can work:

“What are we watching tonight?” asked Jude.
Sarah shuffled the DVDs on the shelf to get a better look. “Star Wars, tonight?”
“Amazing.”
“We could watch Indiana Jones if you’d like?” she said.
“Nah, Star Wars. With popcorn.”

This is pretty basic dialogue, it’s OK but it doesn’t really make for good reading and frankly, its dull. I’ll rewrite this section and you can see for yourself how a little conflict can really give it more energy and readability.

“What are watching tonight?” asked Jude.
Sarah shuffled the DVDs on the shelf to get a better look. “Star Wars, tonight?”
“That shit, again?”
“We haven’t watched any Star Wars since Sunday night,” she said.
“Yeah, I know. And the Sunday before that and the one before that! Don’t you ever try something new, Sarah?”

This rewrite has conflict, unlike the original draft. It’s pretty mundane stuff but actually gives a little bit of purpose to the dialogue – we learn more about the characters in the same amount of text without really having to change much. Dialogue is plot, plot is confrontation, confrontation is dramatic and therefore entertaining to read. If your dialogue does not advance the plot or aids in creating your character, remove it. It isn’t helping.

So, onto the juicy stuff.

Part One – Literary Tactics on Dialogue

Organics

The primary rule here is that fictional dialogue of any sort is not directly transposed from real-life dialogue. It doesn’t work, because when we talk naturally we interrupt ourselves with filler noises while we think or sigh and make gestures with our bodies. With this in mind, keep your dialogue concise, meaning you should cut it right back to the essentials only. If there is no character advancement or plot work going on, get rid of it as it doesn’t make for good reading.

While we’re at it – we don’t always use social niceties when we talk. I am forever just shouting a colleagues name, sometimes getting it wrong on purpose. It’s also not organic to greet someone formally every time they come into the room to talk. This leads nicely into using incomplete or cut back sentences. Rather than ask:

“Do you want to drink some beer with me?”

We would simply say:

“Want a beer?”

It is implied that by asking about the possession of beer, you’re likely to share it.

Tags and Vacuum Speech

Tags are really simple devices to break up the dialogue. In real life we don’t just face each other and speak blandly forwards, often we are pausing or watching the other person for reactions. Stephen King makes it very clear that simply using the word said is more than enough of a tag to help the reader keep up with the dialogue. He said, she said, or using the character name sparingly is enough of a tag to help the conversation flow.

Be careful with tags though, as they can easily become overused and distract the reader with a speedy battle of paddle war. To get around this, using descriptive tags can alter the pace of your dialogue. Descriptive tags are little actions which we all do when we talk; preparing food, typing away at a computer desk or lighting a cigarette. These descriptions give a sense of life and purpose to the characters. Caution though, avoid adverbs (usually ending in the suffix ‘ly’) such as frighteningly. Rather, describe these actions and emotions with the characters reactions.

Line Punch

Another easy little device is to alter the length of lines in your dialogue. Shortening lines in a dialogue adds some punch into the conversation by allowing the reader to break or rest for a brief moment. Overextending the reader is usually a result of boring, lengthy lines of dialogue which feel faked.

If one character is talking with lengthy lines and the responses are single words or short and sharp lines, we may assume that the second character is being evasive or unhelpful.

Tension can also be built up as dialogue lines become shorter, suggesting the conversation is reaching a climax where neither character is prepared to talk further, possibly resulting in conflict.

Part 2 – Characterisation & Dialogue

Collins English Dictionary describes characterisation as:

“Characterization is the way an author or an actor describes or shows what a character is like.”

The key words here are describes and shows. As with any writing devices, it is always preferred to show the reader rather than tell them (especially when it comes to exposition). For this reason you must consider your character in detail and then use their dialogue or monologue to effectively portray who they are. This is tricky, but with some background notes you should be able to overcome dry dialogue. The following are not in any particular order of importance.

Emotional conventions are habits learned from background and upbringing. They will add life and realism to your characters with proper use. In some cases however it is always best to avoid stereotypes, even mild ones, as these may seem trite.

books on bookshelves

Education

Education is an important consideration. Educated people behave differently from those with a poor or no education. Characters are likely to appear less aggressive (although appearances can be deceptive) with an education, avoiding direct confrontation and possess a wider vocabulary than others while likely to use correct grammar. Educated characters are also likely to use literary devices like rhetoric to convey their meaning and intent. Conversely, those with a poor education are more likely to use colloquialisms and repeat themselves..

Gender (Stereotypes)

Gender in dialogue only really refers to the stereotypes. Generally female dialogue is considered to be wandering and generally less competitive with a focus on establishing common ground, than male dialogue. This doesn’t mean your female character has to be these things, of course not. However it does highlight how readers perceive female dialogue to be. Finally, it is considered to be widely accepted for a women to be more emotional in public, whereas men are often ridiculed or treated with a measure of discomfort for showing strong emotions in public. Play around with these ideas, and be happy with how much you include in your dialogue. Stereotypes can be ignored!

Family & Religious Background

Every family is unique with its little quirks and traditions and sometimes religious practices plays into those quirks. Where family promotes its own habits of emotion, religion often has social constraints and these will help define your character and their dialogue. Usually a strong religious background will prevent cussing or taking a deities name in vain. A character with strict parents, for example a stern military figure, may remain taciturn and stoic during most of the dialogue and may struggle with showing emotions. Those with a formal upbringing are less likely to interrupt others and use formal titles when addressing figures of authority. Think about where your character has come from and who they are forming a dialogue with.

three women wearing turbands

Ethnicity

Ethnicity is a tricky element of a character. As mentioned previously, it is best to avoid stereotypes, but then again, they exist. Ethnicity tends to be tied closely with the previous sections of characterisation. Consider for a moment a high powered business man standing before a board of shareholders. Chances are you imagined a white caucasian man in a suit. Now imagine this business man has received news of the death of a friend, does he; break down in tears or does he clench his jaw, finish the meeting and go home to his den and drink whiskey in stony silence?

Consider a street vendor who sells food receiving the same news, surrounded by his community and friends. Is he more likely to break down in tears than the previous example? Likely, yes. In some cultures it is perfectly acceptable for anyone to drop to the floor in tears, or wail freely. The point we’re trying to make here is that emotion and dialogue are connected, and different ethnicity’s will react to strong emotion or sudden change with different responses. Linking back to education, you may find that the business man will respond to grief with definite terms and phrases, whereas the street vendor is likely to repeat themselves and stammer, vocalising their dismay openly and sporadically.

Circumstances

Circumstances alter our dialogue drastically and are strongly linked to the timing of the characters dialogue. Consider the following lines:

“An hour into our night patrol and suddenly we’re taking fire, tracer rounds lighting up the ridge dead ahead. A storm of bullets was tearing our position up and I had trouble shouting out call signs – I had to check for injured but I couldn’t move my damn lips!”

This is an example of character describing a previous incident. When reflecting, people tend to focus on giving the reader a sense of backstory and details which had likely been soaked in subconsciously. If the action was taking place in real time, either through a flashback or direct descriptions the dialogue would be very different. Keep the context, cut the dialogue right back to something simple, your character probably doesn’t have time to think of a full sentence:

“Taking fire, find cover!”

Or in our previous example, no dialogue at all. Sometimes silence is enough for the reader to get the idea.

Concluding this episode

Some of the best advice you can get is to break the rules, play with your dialogue and proof it many times. If you’re not happy with, move on and come back to it. If you’re unsure, read out the lines as if you were acting and see if the dialogue for each character sounds different enough to be real.

Here’s a nice link for grammar in dialogue. It’s nicely worded, but be aware that dialects of English, such as UK and US English will have a few different ideas. Personally I think if you stick to one type you’ll be fine!

Finally, if you can get a copy, this is the best book I’ve seen out there for UK grammar.

J.D Ferris, CC

Literary Devices Part 1 – Four ideas on How to add something to your fiction, prose or poems

Literary Devices Part 2 – Four more ideas on how to add something to your fiction, prose or poems

Literary Devices Part 3 – How to avoid Exposition Pitfalls in your fiction, prose and poems

Literary devices part 5 – The Mood; setting, diction and bounce

NaNoWriMo Day 1: Unexpected Lessons.

The first day is done. Well, there’s plenty of daylight left but I powered through last night and got to my word count by about 4AM. It was nice to feel so motivated, so I kept telling myself that I could write this piece afterwards to document my experience, which got me to the end. You have to find ways of justifying the effort to yourself, especially if you have problems with motivation like me. We’re getting there.

I had the bare bones of my story in my mind and some scant notes, but I didn’t really know how I was going to flesh out the character development. So that was my goal going into it, using the narrative ideas I’d come up with as a vehicle to develop those ideas, I found that not knowing myself really helped me present those ideas to the reader in a cogent way, and by the end of the first 1680 words, I found that I knew who my protagonist was, what she cared about and developed her relationships with her parents.

It’s quite amazing what you can get done when you sit down, have a plan, and put the work in.

I hope this article format is interesting. If anyone has any questions or wants to talk about their NaNoWriMo experience, I’d be happy to start a dialogue.

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Inktober Ends: Week Four in Review

And that’s that, it’s the end of the month, the end of Inktober. It’s a weird mix of feelings, relief at the end of time pressures, sadness at the end of the community and joy at having completed the challenge.

This last week (and a little bit) flew by and was full of fun prompts.

One notable pick from this week was to revisit a witch I’ve drawn before, which to me only meant one witch. It was a picture that I drew around four years ago when I was working nights and tired but I was so proud of it and still am! It helped me see that I could achieve what I wanted to if I only put the work in. And now, having revisited it I see that even more. Being able to see the change is motivating, so if you are having trouble with any creative endeavour look back on something you made some time ago and focus on the improvements.

IMG-20181030-WA0001

IMG-20181030-WA0002

LB got up to some cute shenanigans over the week. I really enjoy drawing him just living, enjoying his little life and having fun with his friends. As conceited as it may sound I love the characters and find them very cute. That’s what I’m trying to focus on, things that I enjoy, fun things that keep me going back to drawing, that’s what these have taught me.

prickly

muddy

 

So that’s it for this Inktober journey, it was challenging, informative and fun. I made some artist friends who were going through the same things and I hope that after the haze of Inktober fades I will make many more!

If you want to see more from me then Instagram is the best place and you can find me @smidgedraws

Thank you for reading my reviews for this Inktober, I’m sure I will be back at some point with other art projects.

Whatever you’re doing this year, have a-

IMG-20181031-WA0000

Tools used:

Pigma Microns and a sketchbook

ipad pro 12.9 inches, apple pencil, procreate.
Smidge, of Smidge Draws for CreatorConsortium.com