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Your Guide To Pulp RPG In The New Year

Hello there friends!

We’re here again to tell you all about the exciting things that are going to be happening with Pulp RPG in the near future. Recently we finished the first official draft of the basic rules; a lightweight roleplay system designed to allow you and your gaming group to seamlessly run games in any setting you’d like!

We’re very proud of how it turned out, and you can get your hands on the early release version by going over to our Discord server and shouting at us to hand it over!

Link to Discord: https://discord.gg/PGj8yYS

We’re also nearing completion on the first official adventure pack for Pulp: Chasing Zombie Hitler Through Panama In 1948. This madcap adventure sees you taking the role of an auspicious stranger, caught up in post-war supernatural skullduggery, facing down the most evil man in history with the powers of undeath on his side. As normal with all pulp material, it will be free to download from this website once published in the new year.

We also have many exciting projects lined up for next year! We have The Godless Realm: the first official campaign setting for Pulp RPG, set in a boundless fantasy world inhabited by deadly gods and countless monsters for you and your friends to face.

Our podcast – “Talking Pulp” – where we discuss Godless Realm

Mr. Ferris is also working on a horror themed setting: Pulp Nightmare – you’ll find yourself immersed in a terrible post-apocalyptic world where truly, the only thing to fear, is fear itself.

Then lastly we have Mr. Steadman’s pet project: Pulp StarFight – a fully fleshed-out science fiction setting brimming with political intrigue, fleet battles and weird and wonderful alien races.

Our last article on Pulp RPG – Tons of info!

There is so much more to tell, but for fear of this article getting too wordy, we’re going to leave you guessing, but rest assured we’ve got a whole host of amazing content for you coming up in 2019, so stay tuned!

Sincerely yours,

The Creator Consortium Team.

Subscribe to our mailing list to stay up to date! – http:/eepurl.com/dLtzIo

NaNoWriMo 2018: Woah-oh We’re Half Way There.

And so the sun rises on another day, and I realise that I’ve not been so productive or learned so much about my writing in many a year, for that I am grateful to NaNoWriMo. I’m really happy that I started this journey and am confident that I will finish, and that I will have a real body of work that I will be happy with at the end of it.

By now, if you are following along, you should be about half way through your story. I’d say I am definitely half way through and can present an ending, but I’m definitely feeling like I should be further along in the narrative, even though not a lot has happened really. I suppose that is a symptom of this challenge only being 50k words, which is very short for any sort of real story.

If you’re riding high on momentum, keep doing what you’re doing. If you’re floating in the doldrums, hardly hitting your targets, or even staring down the barrel of a few 3000 word days, then just look at what you’ve done so far, appreciate that every word is another step to achieving your goals, and knuckle down to get this done.

Good luck, all. See you in another 10k words.

 

Join the discord to help build our community!

https://discord.gg/PGj8yYS

NaNoWriMo Day 1: Unexpected Lessons.

The first day is done. Well, there’s plenty of daylight left but I powered through last night and got to my word count by about 4AM. It was nice to feel so motivated, so I kept telling myself that I could write this piece afterwards to document my experience, which got me to the end. You have to find ways of justifying the effort to yourself, especially if you have problems with motivation like me. We’re getting there.

I had the bare bones of my story in my mind and some scant notes, but I didn’t really know how I was going to flesh out the character development. So that was my goal going into it, using the narrative ideas I’d come up with as a vehicle to develop those ideas, I found that not knowing myself really helped me present those ideas to the reader in a cogent way, and by the end of the first 1680 words, I found that I knew who my protagonist was, what she cared about and developed her relationships with her parents.

It’s quite amazing what you can get done when you sit down, have a plan, and put the work in.

I hope this article format is interesting. If anyone has any questions or wants to talk about their NaNoWriMo experience, I’d be happy to start a dialogue.

Our Discord Server: https://discord.gg/PGj8yYS

Inktober Ends: Week Four in Review

And that’s that, it’s the end of the month, the end of Inktober. It’s a weird mix of feelings, relief at the end of time pressures, sadness at the end of the community and joy at having completed the challenge.

This last week (and a little bit) flew by and was full of fun prompts.

One notable pick from this week was to revisit a witch I’ve drawn before, which to me only meant one witch. It was a picture that I drew around four years ago when I was working nights and tired but I was so proud of it and still am! It helped me see that I could achieve what I wanted to if I only put the work in. And now, having revisited it I see that even more. Being able to see the change is motivating, so if you are having trouble with any creative endeavour look back on something you made some time ago and focus on the improvements.

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LB got up to some cute shenanigans over the week. I really enjoy drawing him just living, enjoying his little life and having fun with his friends. As conceited as it may sound I love the characters and find them very cute. That’s what I’m trying to focus on, things that I enjoy, fun things that keep me going back to drawing, that’s what these have taught me.

prickly

muddy

 

So that’s it for this Inktober journey, it was challenging, informative and fun. I made some artist friends who were going through the same things and I hope that after the haze of Inktober fades I will make many more!

If you want to see more from me then Instagram is the best place and you can find me @smidgedraws

Thank you for reading my reviews for this Inktober, I’m sure I will be back at some point with other art projects.

Whatever you’re doing this year, have a-

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Tools used:

Pigma Microns and a sketchbook

ipad pro 12.9 inches, apple pencil, procreate.
Smidge, of Smidge Draws for CreatorConsortium.com

Literary Devices Part 3 – How to avoid Exposition Pitfalls in your fiction, prose and poems

Exposition is a literary device defined as the author providing information to the reader. The mistake of many new fiction writers is to immediately give the reader all the information. Right away. All at once. Page after page. This sort of exposition is dry, boring and likely results in your book being put down after a few minutes.

Don’t get me wrong, exposition has its place in the world; scientific articles, news reports and encyclopaedias are typical examples. It is considered a formal, matter-of-fact writing style and is sometimes given the name direct exposition. Direct exposition is considered a poor style of fiction writing – readers can’t handle all the information in one go, or the immersion of the story is broken by poorly disguised or placed information.

So, how do you get your information across to the reader?

The key is to trickle your amazing world history (or whatever) into the story as you go, ideally before the reader needs to know this information. Building up this way is simple and discrete and does wonders for your readership.

Jo Walton suggests that the best way to get information flowing throughout your work is to scatter it discretely, allowing it to seamlessly integrate rather than dumping it in. You can achieve this through various actions; dialogue between characters, flashbacks in which the story unfolds much like in movies and TV series, character thoughts and feelings, even describing news reports in the background of the situation. We call these forms of exposition indirect exposition.

The details, let’s get into more detail!

Dialogue is the verbal exchange between two or more characters. It can help you slip in some subtle exposition if the topic of the conversation relates to the information you’re trying to include. It’s as simple as discussing past events, concerns for the future or predictions based on a character experience.

Flashbacks are the author or narrator taking the reader backwards in time to describe a previous situation pertinent to the plot of the main story. They give the reader a sense of time and depth to the characters involved and can offer insight into possible future events beyond current time in the story. Tension can be generated when the reader knows a little more than the characters do. Don’t overdo flashbacks though, they can become tedious if they’re the only source of indirect exposition.

Thoughts and feelings are personal views belonging to your characters and are used in much the same way as a flashback, usually from an internal perspective:

“Why didn’t she turn left? Twenty years of living on the estate and she’s always turned left – she couldn’t help it.”

In-story media or news can really kick your exposition home. All that needs to happen is for a character to interact, either seeing, hearing or indeed taking part in the media platform:

“Chelsey grabbed the remote and flipped the TV volume up. She couldn’t believe her eyes – the stock market had collapsed. All the money they had invested, all the effort and pain they had endured to get their business working had been for naught. Economic war, the news presenter said, was leading to air, sea and land deployment of US troops on EU soil.”

Finally, a worthy note on narrative backstory.

Narrative backstory is when the author promotes some of the history or relevant information at the start of the story. You would normally find this sort of prologue in older fiction, usually pre-1950’s (the height of pulp fiction). It can work in modern fiction, but should be used sparingly – there’s a reason it’s not as popular anymore! However, if a character is recollecting the events or situation it allows for the reader to come to an understanding of the personal effects of this backstory. You will find that authors like H.P Lovecraft often wrote in the fashion of a personal journal or statement of the narrator, which adds a personal feel to a classical plot.

That wraps up today’s literary devices article! If you’ve been affected by any of the content of this article, or if you know of anyone who has, please get in touch and we can discuss the ideas more!

J.D Ferris, CC

Literary Devices Part 1 – Four ideas on How to add something to your fiction, prose or poems

Literary Devices Part 2 – Four more ideas on how to add something to your fiction, prose or poems

Literary Devices Part 4 – Dialogue techniques and capturing fictional realism

Literary devices part 5 – The Mood; setting, diction and bounce

Literary Devices Part 2 – Four more ideas on how to add something to your fiction, prose or poems

Getting closer to NaNoWriMo!

We’ve got some more unusual literary devices for your perusal today. We’ve scraped the barrel and hoisted the sales to bring these weirdly named tricks to add some flare and depth to your writing styles. See if you can make use of them in your month of writing – the fun unfolds!

Anadiplosis

Is it Ana-dip-losis or Ana-di-plosis? I’m going with the latter! This odd sounding technique is actually very simple – when you break a sentence down into clauses, you can choose to end a clause and start the next clause with the same word. It’s a really simple technique and adds weight to the authority of your tone. For example:

“That man speaks in lies, lies carried from the grave!”

Those smart ancient Greeks like to use this method, it pops up everywhere. My favourite example:

“The mountains look on Marathon – And Marathon looks on the sea.”

They’re quite simple to create and can be used in fiction, prose and poetry. This isn’t to be confused with a chiasmus which inverts the meaning between the clauses of a sentence – more on those later!

Bathos

Bathos uses a dwindling cohesion of metaphors and descriptions to show growing passion of the topic – it’s also used to create silly comedy. I am not a comedian, but here’s the best example I can come up with:

“He urged his friend to stop, to think about the children, to really consider what he was doing – how could he use French mustard on roast beef?”

OK so my example wasn’t great, but used properly bathos can create a strong contrast in the tone of your piece or add a delicate level of wit to something which is actually quite serious.

Chiasmus & Antimetabole

These two are so close together as literary devices that they are often used interchangeably. They’re not entirely the same however. They are used ideally in speeches or perhaps opening lines as rhetoric. When a sentence is repeated by its reversal, to convey an idea or define a point, it is called chiasmus (ki-as-mus). In an antimetabole (anti-me-tab-o-lee) however the words and grammatical structure are also reversed. My example of an antimetabole is one which I have to say a lot during my day job:

“I work to live, not live to work,”

All I’ve done is swap the word work and live around in the second half of the sentence to change the meaning around. For a chiasmus I’ve had to take an example from online, because it’s pretty difficult to distinguish the two types (and some are listed under both literary devices!):

“Never let a fool kiss you or a kiss fool you.”

Thank goodness for examples!

Dactyl

Sounds a bit like a dinosaur type creature, right? Well, Dactyl is an old Greek word for a finger and here’s why we use it to describe this literary device: a dactyl plays on a single word of three syllables, with the verbal accent of the first syllable emphasised over the second and third. The technique is used mostly in poetry (some say overused) to the point where its kind of normalised now. The opposite to this is the anapest, which puts the emphasis on the second two syllables rather than the first.

So, a dactyl in poetry (which is in itself a dactyl, PO-e-try) can consist of a series of dactyls in order to provide a meter for the reader, some say this gives the poem or piece of work a galloping effect -which people then link to The Charge of the Light Brigade, a famous and overused example online:

Half a league, half a league,

Half a league onward

All in the valley of Death

You could argue that a dactyl can build a rhythm in your written work when the time is right, whether that’s a galloping charge of mounted soldiers or the specific beat of a drum, dactyls can be used as a literary device to help convey strong imagery.

This wraps up today’s unusually named literary devices. We hope you’ve enjoyed learning about some weird but cool and subtle tricks to add life to your fiction. Let us know if you have any success or if you’ve got any questions. Maybe you can improve on our descriptions? We’d love to get you involved!

J.D. Ferris, CC

Literary Devices – Four ideas on How to add something to your fiction, prose or poems

Literary Devices Part 3 – How to avoid Exposition Pitfalls in your fiction, prose and poems