Tag Archives: Author

NaNoWriMo Prep: You Can Do It.

The month has gone by in a blur, our anticipation peaks as all the carefully collected and fleshed out notes (Ha!) are ready to come together to provide a much needed shove when we finally tick over to November first.

My technique has been to come up with an idea, write about two pages of notes, then let the rest of my ideas bounce around my head until I know exactly where I’m going with the story for the first few chapters. As a writer I’m definitely more of a “fly by the seat of my pants” type instead of meticulously planning everything out. When I get into the zone, I tend to just link the main plot points together with prose that tends to just flow out.

I don’t care about names, or the facts of my world, or even if I introduce a character only to forget about them five pages on. This thing is going to be about getting your thoughts onto the page any way you can. If you find yourself staring at the page for any extended amount of time, then stand up, get some fresh air, eat, do something different to bring you out of that frame of mind because you’ll soon feel defeated. If you do take a break, then be sure to come back to it in the same day or you’ll feel awful the next day with more to do and it won’t be long before you’ll hate the process.

If you get through the first week and you’ve hit most of your targets then you’ll feel fantastic and I think that is the point at which you’ll know if you’ve cracked it. But always remember your story, when you’re not writing, write notes about the plot points you’ve introduced and where they could go. You want to be able to look back on your novella and think “That’s pretty clever” at least once or twice.

You can do this. The biggest problem is finding free time. If anyone demands you leave your cave in the middle of writing, or tries to organise some event on a day you need to knuckle down and get some writing done, then either tell them that you’re trying to become the next best selling author or bring your laptop and be prepared to get dirty looks from some people as you sit in the cinema typing your manuscript.

Be the writer you want to be. Part-time writers are no writers at all. You need to sacrifice yourself to some degree to make this happen. And yes, I am mostly writing this for myself, I just hope it resonates with some of you, because I’m nervous and scared and hope it’s good. Even confident people struggle with stuff like this. You can do it though, I believe in you.

Author of “Emilia The Witch” for NaNoWriMo,

J.A.Steadman.

Our brand new free RPG is born! CC’s Pulp

Have you ever wanted to be a mobster in the prohibition era, or fight martians attacking earth in the silver screen years of the 50s?

Well CC’s Pulp RPG aims to bring that to the table.

All you need are pencils & paper, the free copy of our rules and several six sided dice to start failing rolls and cursing the fickle gods of fate right away; whether you’re cracking the whip as Tom Raider Jones, chasing Zombie Hitler through panama in 1948, or drawing your peacemaker at high noon, then we’ve got you covered.

With the expansion and module model that we’ve developed, you can play through the exciting story of Tom Raider Jones in our curated adventure pack, or use his 1930s pre-war setting to raid your own tombs and shoot your own Nazis!

Whether you’re new to role-playing games or are veteran players, our years of world building experience, combined with our love of rolling dice will ensure you have some amazing sessions with CC’s Pulp RPG.

Keep your eyes peeled for the first version of the rules which will be available soon, for free, along with our first adventure pack “Chasing Zombie Hitler Through Panama In 1948.”

J.D. Ferris & J.A.Steadman,

Co-founders

CC’s Free Pulp RPG core pulls together

NaNoWriMo Prep: Worldbuilding For Fun And Profit!

You sit there, with your word document open, staring at you, judging you, as the ideas coil and constrict your creativity like a vice. If only you could just begin. If only you could just form those first few sentences then the rest would flow and your one hundred and twenty thousand word magnum opus would be finished in months and the publishers would be beating your door down.

Or maybe you’ve started a thousand stories but they’ve all fizzled out after a thousand words and your frustration, nay exhaustion, knows no bounds.

Well I’m here to make the case for worldbuilding as a way to not just propel your writing to greater things, but to add a sense of achievement to what you do. Remember, as long as you are putting pen to paper, or bit to chip, you’re writing.

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There are many people who say you shouldn’t get stuck into the cycle of worldbuilding. Just as writers will tell you that you shouldn’t take so many notes or continuously do research as a form of procrastination, and it’s true that you will get nowhere if you don’t put real work into the craft of writing. It is also true, however, that the only way to become a success in writing (whatever that means) is to be true to your own uniqueness and allow others to see it; to buy into what sets you apart. I believe that worldbuilding is a cathartic and interesting way to find this in yourself.

After that long and rambling justification, we finally get to the salient point: what exactly is worldbuilding? I for one see it as the process of contextualising the infinite, grounding the ineffable and all in all building scaffolding around the characters, places and worlds that you will write about.

Where to start? Well, like everything else, it depends. You need to know your story first, even if it’s only in the planning stages. Know all the little quirks and concepts you want before launching in. As an example, let’s use the world I’ve been working on recently – Furlands (working title). The concept is that this is an entirely mundane middle-ages setting with an European flavour, with all that it entails: castles, swords, chivalry and a sense of gritty adventure.

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What sets it apart is that all the characters are rodents, or creatures of that ilk, think Redwall meets game of thrones. It sounds reductive but the whole world stemmed From this idea  and honestly half the work is done for you; the rest is maps, names and intertwining little events that give that context and flavour to the background of your stories, be they a swashbuckling adventure on airships or a tale of tomb-robbing alien god-kin.

I’ll no doubt get more into worldbuilding in a future article, but I believe it’s a good place to start as we begin the run up to NaNoWriMo.

Take care and keep writing!

J.A.Steadman.