Tag Archives: Army

The 9th Age: A New Warhammer Fantasy Battles?

A month ago I wrote an article on why I was giving Age of Sigmar (AoS) a second look. The response was brilliant – we managed 9K hits with a variety of reader interaction. Some of that interaction was, understandably, hateful. I addressed the comments, which seemed to suggest I was being paid to paint Games Workshop (GW) in a brilliant light.

In the same section of comments however, I was approached by Piteglio, founder of Veil of the Ages, one of many 9th Age supporting companies. I was asked, assuming I was impartial, whether I would review the 9th Age, a community created by not-for-profit groups of tabletop war-gaming fans.

The 9th Age website has just been published with its new, atmospheric and well presented website, so it makes sense to take a look and see what all the fuss is about.

So, welcome to what will be a 3 part series reviewing the 9th Age. In the first part I’m going to be looking at the game association as a whole, discovering its foundations and ethos. I’ll also be looking at the rules and judging them for how accessible they are to veteran and new war-gaming players.

In the later articles of this series, I’ll be looking into the theme and world lore and taking a look at some of the army lists available. My focus there will be comparing Games Workshop’s old High Elves to the Highborn Elves of 9th age, and the old Empire to that of the Sohnstal Empire.

Finally, I’ll get a few games under my belt and draw some comparisons to the old Warhammer Fantasy Battles in the last episode. This should be the culmination of the mini-series and maybe somewhere along the way I’ll convince you to try a few games for yourself!

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

What is 9th Age

In some western cultures, if you cannot find exactly what you’re looking for, you should have a go at making it yourself – this is the core of the foundation of the 9th Age. When GW shut down their much loved Warhammer Fantasy Battles the gaming community around it had an emotional time. When Games Workshop introduced Age of Sigmar many of the players felt aggrieved, and to some degree I agree with them.

To challenge the absence of a much loved tabletop war-game, a small group of self-motivated players decided to revive their fondness of WFB by creating something of their own. 9th Age was born.

In a nutshell, The 9th Age is:

  • a tactical, rank and file tabletop battle emulation in a pseudo-medieval fantasy world,
  • maintained by hundreds of passionate players from all over the world,
  • totally free to get your hands on the rule-books and supplements, forever!
  • designed with precision for tournament gamers, yet easy to access for casual and narrative.

Initial Misconception

When I first heard of 9th Age, we played Warhammer and Dungeons & Dragons (among other games). When we realised that the 8th Edition WFB was going to be the last, we started looking for something alternative. One housemate stumbled upon 9th Age. 

The documents and rules were still in their infancy and there was a quick series of changes which made us feel the game was not yet stable. We dropped 9th Age and investigated different ideas (or in fact, kept playing 8th edition WFB).

Looking back, we should have realised that 9th Age was still in its infancy and going through a series of developmental changes, some of which I suspect was hindered by in depth balancing and potentially some copyright laws.

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

So, who are 9th Age?

The 9th Age was created and developed by 6 competitive fantasy battle enthusiasts, coming from 5 countries around the globe. That was 2015, now 270 members work towards developing the 9th Age across 29 countries. That’s pretty staggering.

What is most remarkable is that this association of like minded enthusiasts work for free. No one, at any level, earns money or fame for their hard work. There is no formal company and members are not expected to work to hard deadlines. Of course, some of them have experience in their particular areas, but as a whole, the association is free running, headed by an executive board who put the whole lot into one efficient package.

Why is this important, I hear you ask?

Unlike like most war-games, 9th Age is not run for profit – they don’t even supply miniatures for the game they created and develop which, importantly for the players of this game, means the tabletop war-game is balanced: there is no need to create better or tougher armies to sell alongside newly released miniatures. No power creep here (looking at you, Games Workshop!) It also inspired a huge run of small independent miniature model companies, creating a staggering amount of new and unique looking tabletop miniatures.

Best of all, it means the army book / army lists are inspired by the background, the world setting. Imagine, a world rich in lore and strife with well represented armies and politics? Seems too good to be true doesn’t? Well, it took a number of years for Warhammer Fantasy Battles to develop its own rich lore, so why can’t 9th Age? In fact, 9th Age has more people working on it than probably ever entered the boardrooms of Games Workshop HQ (uncited opinion).

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

Armies & Factions

Enough about who and what, let’s take a look at the game itself! I’ll address some of the questions I have or have been asked:

Can I play my favorite fantasy army?

Yup. Totally.

Currently 9th Age have 16 “army books” to play with. Each one is free and available from the 9th Age download page. They are currently all black and white, and mostly easy-print PDF documents with a couple of more detailed files as optional downloads. Did I mention they were free? Check out the Sylvan Elves full colour PDF – its big, but there is some seriously good artwork and background information there!

The list of available army lists include (in no particular order):

  1. Daemon Legions
  2. Sylvan Elves
  3. Undying Dynasties
  4. Warriors of the Dark Gods
  5. Beast Herds
  6. Dread Elves
  7. Dwarven Holds
  8. Empire of Sonnstahl (think state troops)
  9. Highborn Elves
  10. Infernal Dwarves
  11. Kingdom of Equitaine (think knights & peasants)
  12. Ogre Khans
  13. Orcs & Goblins
  14. Saurian Ancients (think lizard nations)
  15. The Vermin Swarm (think rats, rats everywhere)
  16. Vampire Covenant

On top of this list, there’s also the Asklanders and the Makhar which are supplementary armies (currently I believe they are under review). There’s also a quick guide to playing your first game, spell cards, printable terrain and an arcane compendium among other helpful and totally free downloads to get you started. Finally, you can get everything in one solid document, but I wouldn’t recommend you print it out…

Are the different armies up to date or will they change quickly?

With the exception of the last two (Asklanders & Makhar) all of the books are up to date. More importantly, they will not be changed for around 4-5 years, meaning tournament players can rely on stability and casual players benefit from being able to collect and use only what they want.

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

Game Mechanics

So this is for me where the nostalgia really started to kick in. You remember when you first picked up a book for Warhammer Fantasy Battles and you had no idea how it worked, but you had the feeling that you were holding something esoteric and world changing?

That’s what I got from perusing the game mechanics. From what I could tell, everything was there that a much younger (90’s) version of myself became totally enthralled in. Armies are built based on a points system (or an amount of gold, if like me you prefer a more narrative theme), with elite troops costing more than standard troops. The design of the army starts around the leader and their entourage, with a percentage of your points allowed for certain types of troops.

The commander type characters are faceless compared to Warhammer, because the 9th Age tries to keep them realistic. They even point this out in their design statement: characters should be “folklore heroic” and not literal monsters of the battle field, something which unbalanced the later editions of Warhammer Fantasy Battles.

How hard /easy is it to learn?

This is a good question. If you are or were a player of Warhammer Fantasy Battles, you will feel totally at home. 9th Age harkens to the days where Warhammer Fantasy Battles was still balanced and made sense to the majority of its players. With the exception of names and phrases in the rule-book, I would argue 9th Age holds all the robust parts of Warhammer, with some better modifications for clarity and brevity on the tabletop. And of course, the game follows a clear turn / round system which most tabletop gamers will be comfortable with.

For totally new players, it can be quite a steep learning curve, but then so too were most tabletop war games of the time (with the exception of games like Age of Sigmar Skirmish, which I believe is a great introductory game to tabletop war-gaming). If you’re totally new to war-gaming, I suggest you read the next section.

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

How accessible to new players is it?

Fortunately, there is a 9th Age beginners quick-guide, which talks you through the basics in easy to digest chunks. All you need is some paper, pencils, measuring rule and dice to get your started. This really appealed to me because you don’t need to spend any money before you start the game. You could set a game up on your bedroom floor or kitchen table with some cut-out squares and some random items to act as terrain. So long as you label your paper and cut them to the right size to represent units, you’ve not got anything to hold you back.

Running alongside the quick start guide there are some example army lists which you can print out and use. All the choices are made for you, so if you don’t know how to create a balanced army, you can use these. It’s a bit like using pre-made characters in Dungeons & Dragons – everything you need is there.

So you really don’t need to spend time buying, gluing and painting anything until you’re absolutely sure you want to get involved. It also means you get to try out different army compositions or entirely new factions. For me, this is great because there was nothing worse than buying into a Warhammer army and then realising they were completely under powered and your chances of success were limited based on your poorly informed decision!

I may need help creating one those army lists…

It has been pointed out in the comments that the 9th Age is fully compatible with BattleScribe (we reviewed Battle Scribe a while ago, here). BattleScribe is community driven and contains data for just about every tabletop game that requires army building lists. If you’re new to war-gaming, check it out, it’ll make you 9th Age army lists much quicker and likely more accurate too (and you can export and print out those lists for ease, with all the data you need).

Is it a tournament game or a casual game?

It seems, from what I can tell, to be a game designed for both. As I mentioned previously tournament players will enjoy the precision of the game, while not locking out new or casual players. You can play small games and large games wherever you are.

Where can I buy miniatures for 9th Age?

The other great thing about 9th Age is that you can use whatever miniatures you like, so long as they fit the scale, which is around 28mm miniatures. As I mentioned earlier, there is a tonne of new businesses creating miniatures in the glowing wake of 9th Age’s comet. I’ll link you to their community created list of potential sellers and distributors.

Their online magazine also has a spot-light for gamer’s armies, in which it shows how some players mix and match from different model companies to create their own unique looking forces. That said, if you have a preferred supplier of miniatures, then feel free to buy solely from them. That’s the great thing, you don’t have to buy from a monopolized supplier – you get to shop around to fit your own budget. This is doubly so for old Warhammer players, since you’ve already got your armies so you don’t need to get more!

Auf deutch, mo poppet, grazie!

English not your first language? Don’t worry – I forgot to mention that the 9th Age is translated in several languages, including:

English, French, German, Spanish, Italian and Polish…

With work being carried out for translations into Chinese (presumably Mandarin), Russian, Serbian and potentially Korean. Again, this is staggering because all this work is being done for free – it’s amazing what people can do when they share their passion for something.

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

Final Thoughts

  • So far I’m getting a good vibe from 9th Age.
  • It feels much more robust than it did several years ago.
  • There is a tonne of intra- and inter-faction choices, meaning you can build an army up that fits your play style or preferred narrative theme.
  • It’s completely free, and despite this, has a very solid feeling to it, which promises fair, balanced and a fun gaming experience.
  • It seems to have the finesse for tournament or competitive players.
  • It’s accessible to brand new players
  • The quick start guide is easy to follow and you’ll be playing your first game(s) within an hour if you put your heads together.

So, will the 9th Age still have me keen to learn more? Do the factions suitably feel like the much loved armies of our youth? What does the game actually play like, how long and quickly can you pick it up..?

That’s it for part one! If you’ve got any questions for the next article, where we’ll be looking at the world lore and the factions in more detail, leave a comment and I’ll try to address them as much as I can!

Here’s a sneak peek to some of the Lore we’ll be covering…

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

All questions for part two and three. I’ll keep you posted!

If you’re interested in creating your own terrain, I’ve got a few links to some how-to articles, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, along with an article on where to get materials and tools for terrain building (more beneficial if you’re based in the UK but helpful for the US, Canada and most of Europe).

You can find me @FerrisWrites for Twitter,

Our Facebook Page!

Controversial Age of Sigmar article here Give Sigmar a Chance: Why I’m giving Games Workshops ‘Age of Sigmar’ a Second Look…!

Veil of the Ages 9th Age wargaming

And finally, as a thank you for providing information and a bit of impetus to keep writing, I’ll provide links to Veil of the Ages by Piteglio! 😉

Veil of the AgesSuccessful Kickstarter, Facebook group!

 

 

 

(All images taken from The 9th Age website and forum, they do not belong to the Creator Consortium or their writers and contributors, July 5, 2019)

BattleScribe: The Only Army List Builder you’ll need for Warhammer 40,000 & Other War games (Opinion)

I first mentioned BattleScribe in this article, briefly and frankly I think it deserves far more than a mere mention. So here it is, my closer look at the free army builder for nearly every war game out there!

I’m a lazy gamer when it comes to war games. Often I forget to bring or just haven’t bought the hard copies of the books that I really do need to play the game. Often I just borrow those belonging to my friends, and more often than not they never see them again for several years as they gather dust.

warhammer 40000 40k fantasy battlescribe army list army builder armylist armybuilder gamesworkshop games workshop

But now, I’ve found something amazing. Something so great that it will blast the dust away from my bookshelf, shoot laser beams from the eyes of my wraithlord and generally add the power of the god-emperor on his relic throne to every aspect of my wargaming.

I’m talking about BattleScribe and I’m talking about Games Workshop’s Warhammer 40,000.

I’ll point out that BattleScribe doesn’t just do Warhammer and Warhammer 40,000 stuff. It covers just about every war game currently out there. The data is maintained by the community, so it’s fairly balanced and as far as we can tell, canon (if that’s even possible for anything Games Workshop?)

Just a few games that jump up as popular, to give you an idea of the coverage:

  • A song of Ice & fire: Tabletop Miniature Game (which I kickstarted but yet to play)
  • AvP: Unleashed
  • Battletech
  • Bolt Action
  • Star Wars Armada, X-Wing & Legion
  • Firestorm
  • Fantasy Battles (the 9th Age guys!)
  • Infinity
  • Halo games
  • Harry potter games
  • Warmachine Hordes
  • Warhammer – all of it, from just about every age and era!

There’s something for just about everyone.

Now, I can’t say that I’ve used much in the way of similar programs, but the ones I have seen are poorly maintained, have hidden pay schemes for some or all content or just don’t have the scope to cover everything war gaming.

But BattleScribe has it all. I’m just getting started. Can you tell?

Features

I lied a bit – there are parts of BattleScribe that you can pay for. But this really doesn’t diminish the value of the program if you use only the free version. I think that after a couple of uses you may be tempted to even throw some spare money their way as a thanks for making your life much easier.

Pros

  • I’m terrible at flicking through the book and understanding how armies come together, detachments and points values, layers of this and that, the colour of the banner under a martian moon, etc. This feisty little program does all that for me – it even tells me if there’s something missing, if I’ve over spent on points, how many command points I have, what I need to eat for breakfast the week before (actually, my mother does that but she’s just as thorough too).
  • You want that list but can’t stand squinting at a screen like a cyberpunk mole? Yeah me too – BattleScribe can export your files as text and HTML. I believe the phone app for android also does PDF. So you can print out your army list, with options for including rules, points values etc.
  • You can share the data using URLs and they can be linked to Dropbox – I don’t ever have to pack a book ever again!
  • You can use BattleScribe on just about any modern platform, from desktops to phones, all makes, and versions.
  • Finally, according to their website you can update and edit files if you spot mistakes.

Cons

  • Using the Android App, it can be a bit fiddly when you first use it, and it does take a little bit of time to learn how it functions and how to edit your choices, such as war gear, detachments and commanders etc. Once you pick this up, and it is fairly intuitive, you’ll be fine. I still didn’t fully understand army detachments and specialist forces, so it took a bit of extra reading – it won’t tell you what things actually are until you select them, then it tells you what is missing. It was a bit of trial and error on coffee break.
  • The data files are community driven – there’s a tonne of slimy teenagers and Dorito dusted nerds out there who may want to fudge the rules a little bit. Those errors you friend found… yeah they may have just been a few tweeks to fit the “theme” of their army.

There are extra features for paying customers, mostly nice fluffy stuff like saving and customising units with names, quick views, some dice tools for when you don’t have any dice or math skills and of course, removing adverts, which I have to say, always sounds worth it.

So what does it all look like?

Well I had a bit of a fiddle and worked an army list which I think is legal, according to BattleScribe.

Here is an example of the output from PDF form, as you can see it lists everything I need to know about the unit. Other than a copy of the rules (which are brief now, thanks to GW’s overhaul) I’m covered.

BattleScribe Example Wraith Lord

You’ll notice that some of the Characteristics are labelled “Characteristic 1” etc. These follow a logical order of the stat line. It’s not really a bad point or a con, but worth mentioning in case you don’t realise in a rush.

The overall PDF has each unit nicely sectioned to set pages, so there’s very little run over. I suspect for something really powerful, like, I dunno, a Chaos character (?) the list may go on for quite a bit, but you’ll have to play around.

Here’s the whole PDF for you to look at. It’s not my final list, but I guess it’s pretty close!

Wraithhost Spearhead (HTML)

warhammer 40000 40k fantasy battlescribe army list army builder armylist armybuilder gamesworkshop games workshop

Finally, the link you’ve all been waiting for for BattleScribe.

So there you have it! Let me know what you think about the BattleScribe and maybe pass them a little donation if you like the work they’ve done!

J.D. Ferris, CC

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Title Art taken from Warhammer Art (I bought a copy) – you can find the poster for sale here.