Basic Leather Working 101

Introduction

When we started the Creator Consortium, we wanted to share how we did things with the world. We wanted to help people get creative and crafty, whether you’re using your hands to sculpt and create physical things or wanted to create fantastic adventures around the coffee table – we were going to be there to give you an idea of where to start.

We’ve not done much of the physical crafting yet, so this is where we start.

This is going to be a three part series looking at how we craft leather from start to finish. The first part is going to be an overview of leather; what tools and materials you will need (or later on, want) with some basics planning ideas to keep your feet grounded before making any mistakes.

In future articles I’ll go into detail on how to create masks from leather, with detailed instructions and pictures:

  • By the end of part one you should have a good idea about what tools you will need, with optional extras.
  • By the end of part two you should have a moulded piece of leather in the form of a mask which should (hopefully) fit snugly to your face.
  • By the end of part three you should have a fully coloured and treated mask, ready for your party, masquerade or LARP event.

I may reference previous parts as we go or give you snippets to future parts as they’re required. There may also be some heavy editing of previous articles as I develop this glorified tutorial.

I’ll be exclusively using vegetable tanned leather as it provides us with a variety of choices and techniques. More on this later.

Firstly, I’m going to provide an insight into the uses and types of leather and ask some questions relating to your specific leather project.

Why use Leather?

Leather is a type of old world plastic. If you know how to manipulate it, you can get it to fulfill a variety of functions. There are some considerations before you start your project however: Is leather the best option for your project? Would there be an easier medium for you to use?

Pros:

  • Easy manipulation, no expensive tools or chemicals required
  • Sturdy material that can take some serious mechanical abuse
  • Variety of uses from small items to full costumes
  • Easy to use (when you know how).

Cons:

  • Not very forgiving, expensive mistakes can happen!
  • Requires a good aftercare regime
  • Storage concerns: spores, mold & degradation can prematurely eat and destroy your hard work!

If you still think leather is for you then read on for some further considerations.

herd of cattle in daytime

Environmental Impact

Leather was once locally sourced and used extensively before plastics were introduced. Unfortunately, now being a globalised industry, it comes with its own complications.

Cattle herds are huge in America, who are one of the largest producers of beef and therefore leather. The impact on the environment is several fold – cattle create methane, farmland and agriculture impact the local atmosphere, and global transportation methods create more pollution.

Some methods of curing leather use chromium salts. These salts are toxic to living organisms (they use chromium salts to denature DNA strands in genetic laboratories). Chromium treated leathers are usually more synthetic looking, with near perfect surfaces with (usually) thinner and very supple qualities. Presumably they are cheaper, quicker to make and easier to use in manufacturing.

Composition of Leather

Leather is essentially skin. When vegetable tanned leather is cured it can become rigid (for thicker leathers) or paper like (such as thin goat skins). The curing process essentially removes the water content without cracking the surface, leaving a smooth and rough side and providing many years of age to what should naturally decompose.

Collagen (face cream adverts talk about it all the time) remains present in the leather and it is this which gives the leather its rigidity. When we wet or soaked, cured leather like vegetable tanned leather we re-hydrate the collagen, making it flexible and less brittle. As the leather dries, if we have done our job correctly, the leather should hold its shape, allowing us to craft intricate and ornate pieces of work, such as masks.

Vegetable tanned leather is used by artisans and crafters all over the world for various projects. It is generally coarser and thicker leather but has a host of applications: in some older types of vehicles it is used for fan belts, it is used for safety attire, all weather clothing, and used as armour up until the second world war, it has a host of utility uses for belts, tool holders, satchels and bags. Vellum is still used in the UK to maintain official government records due to its almost ageless qualities – it is so durable that ancient Kings used it to chronicle their lives.

pexels-photo-404155.jpeg

Types of Leather

There are a variety of leathers out there. I’m going to provide a brief description of the main ones that artisans and small project crafters are more likely to use.

Vegetable Tanned – There is no surface treatment to this sort of leather, meaning it is ideal for tooling and dying. You can wet mould this sort of leather. A wide variety of uses.

Dyed Through Vegetable Tanned – These leathers do not possess  exactly the same qualities as regular natural tanned vegetable as sometimes there can be a dyeing finish, meaning you can’t necessarily carve, tool or wet mould the leather. However it is durable, and looks great for heavy belts and armour.

Splits – the leather is split and the bottom portion is dyed and treated again to create a smooth surface. You’ll find it’s cheaper but it cannot be tooled or dyed again.

Suede Splits – As above, but both sides are treated with the new upper side heavily treated to create a velvety nap. This is a very versatile form of leather but again it cannot be tooled or dyed further. 

Clothing Suede, Nappa, Cow, Pig – Thin, supple and multiple uses but mainly for clothing. It usually comes pre dyed and is not suitable for most types of projects I will cover here. However, it is great for smaller projects that do not require much treatment, such as small clothing items or accessories.

Chamois – This is essentially split sheep skin and is the first thing most people think of when you mention leather. It has a host of uses and is particularly nice for buffing and polishing your car.

Saddlery – The bees knees of leather, this type of leather is pumped to the brim with waxes and dyes. It is incredibly tough and can be very rigid. It is ideal if you’re just cutting armour pieces to shape, but will require thinning at the edges for stitching. Being incredibly tough, it may take a substantial effort to prepare for stitching. People tend to use long rivets instead. You may be able to carve a pattern into it, but you will not be able to tool it.

Kid – for its thinness this type of leather is very strong due to its fine grain. You see it made into wallets or book bindings due to its fine but mighty nature.

Upholstery Hides – Huge hides! These make a great base for leather if you’re making large volumes. Again it cannot be carved or tooled, but it can be cheap if you bulk buy. I’ve made tabards from this sort of leather and studded those tabards with thicker leather plates to create simple armour.

Crafting Tools

You could really go to town and spend a lot of money to buy a huge variety of tools. In the early stages of any craft, you should only get the minimum you need to get by. If you have a precision craft knife, a stanley knife, a steel rule and some paper, pens and pencils you’ll get on without a hitch. Optionally, you could look at getting some of the following tools, but these are really for slightly more complicated projects. Where possible, I’ve provided a “cheap-cheat” alternatives, but you’ll find that getting the right tool for the job does have an impact as you advance.

My list of tools apply mostly to using vegetable tanned leather, if you’re using a different type of leather you may need a variety of different tools.

For Cutting Leather…

Cutting Knives – these are really cheap from most hobby and craft stores. Stanley knives or retractable knives and precision knives have different uses: Use precision knives to cut finer details and complicated shapes, such as eye holes for masks, and retractable knives for cutting big blocks or chunks of leather out.

leather crafting work LARP artisan masquerade armour

Metal Rule – this is, for me, an essential piece of kit for cutting leather shapes. It should go without saying that a metal rule will not get cut up like a plastic one. More importantly, it should have some form of guard to avoid cutting your fingers. When cutting leather, you will likely apply pressure, meaning that if you slip… well it won’t just be a plaster (band aid) required to hold your fingertips in place.

leather crafting work LARP artisan masquerade armour

Hole Punch – it’s not technically cutting leather, but a hole punch is pretty useful. You can get small kits which have various sized punches which you swap out and screw into place. You’ll need a mallet or hammer to use this. Avoid the type that is hand punched with a wheel of different sized punches – it just doesn’t work as well.

leather crafting work LARP artisan masquerade armour

For Carving and Tooling Leather…

Swivel Knife – this is a unique looking knife that looks a bit like a flat headed screwdriver. Swivel knives are used to cut and carve patterns into leather. You don’t need to go nuts here because using a swivel knife takes practice and patience. Some people get the knack of it early on. If you want to practice carving leather without buying one, get a small flat headed screwdriver and try it on a scrap piece of leather. More on this later.

http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/291481826132-0-1/s-l1000.jpg
Image taken from LePrevo Leathers, http://www.leprevo.co.uk

Bevel / Foot Stamp – this little tool is used in conjunction with the swivel knife. After you have cut a line with the swivel knife you can use the bevel stamp (sometimes called a foot) to push one side of the cut down with a small mallet. The process involves moving the foot along the line while tapping the end with the mallet as you go in one smooth process. The result is an almost 3-D appearance. This is the basic technique for people wishing to tool leather and only really works on vegetable tanned leathers.

leather crafting work LARP artisan masquerade armour

For Stitching Leather…

Needles – you can get these very cheaply from haberdasheries. For working with leather you’re going to need thick needles with a larger eyelet hole. This is because simple cotton thread is too small for stitching leather pieces together. If you can afford it, an automatic stitching awl will save you a lot of time and effort, but they do cost more than just needles and thread.

Thread – thicker thread, ideally waxed will be suitable for most leather projects. Thicker threads will be less likely to cut into the hole they are threaded through, meaning you will add life to your final piece. If it is waxed, it will also not rot anywhere as quickly and provide a level of waterproofing to the holes it’s stitched through.

Pricking Awl – this nasty looking device is basically a pointed blade on the end of a handle. It will look like a vicious prison shank. They are used to create tiny cut marks which act as a guide for stitching. They also allow the needle to pass through the leather much easier than if you were trying to punch the leather with the stitching needle. I would not recommend stitching leather without first punching the holes with a pricking awl!

leather crafting work LARP artisan masquerade armour

For Colouring / Dyeing and Finishing Leather

Dyes – There are a variety of ways of colouring leather. The obvious method is to use leather dyes, which are alcohol based and miscible in water (meaning you can thin them down). I use Fiebings leather dye, which come in a variety of colours and shades. Leather dyes wet the leather, so you need to be careful with water moulded leather projects (which I will cover later).

Paints – Alternatively you could use acrylic paints, but these have a habit of cracking as they dry as solids. To avoid this, you can use flexible acrylic paints that contain natural resins or flexi-paints which are made with rubber or latex components. If you’re making something that is not expected to bend, you can just use regular acrylic paints, but I would suggest you water them down and work in two or more thinner layers.

Finishes – You are going to need to add something extra if you’re hoping to take your leather outside or use it for anything other than for display. This is really important if you’re going to use your piece in all weather, such as for LARP events. Even in the summer weather, you will need to protect the colours that you’ve so lovingly applied. Personally, I use a two or more layers of Carnauba wax cream and the thinner but highly waterproof resolene finish.

In conjunction these will waterproof and provide some level of flexibility to your piece, preventing excess moisture going in whilst stopping the leather from drying out and cracking. These make great aftercare materials too, so if you get into making expensive kit for LARP, it may be wise to sell the finishers alongside the main product.

Paint Brushes & Rags – depending on the size of your leather piece, you are going to need to apply that dye or paint somehow. For small pieces such as wallets, belts, scabbards and masks you can get away with artist brushes, for larger surface areas such as armour you may want to invest in a spray gun (you can buy these from model shops and may prove cheaper for short term projects). Rags are rags at the end of the day. Something like dishcloths don’t tend to come with a tonne of loose fibers so they won’t leave marks as you buff the leather up.

Optional pieces include:

Edge Smoother – this little wooden device is great at deburing the edges of your leather. Running it up and down the edge, with the leather in the nook will slowly polish and smooth the edge, making your final piece look cleaner and more professional. They can be expensive, so shop around for cheaper ones – after all, it’s a piece of carved wood.

leather crafting working LARP masquerade armour artisan

Boarder / Edge Cutter – this little device will add border edges to your leather, which can make a piece look finished and also carve a smooth line along the borer into which you can punch holes or run a stitching wheel into for later stitching… which saves time and effort…

20190701_171107

Where to Begin

So let’s assume you have all of your tools, paints and finishes ready. You’ve got your leather ready to go. But where on earth do you start? Well, I have two very important pieces of advice that you should always consider for every project you ever start.

Dream BIG, but think small

It is the best advice you can possibly get when I say: start small.

Leather is unforgiving in that if you make a mistake, you won’t be able to hide it. Unlike fabric where you could stitch a secret piece in, or hide a mistake behind a fold, leather is generally too cumbersome or thick for quick fixes. Of course, you could weather a mistake to make it look deliberate if you wanted an overall finish to match.

So, stay small for your first project. This will give you a feel for how leather behaves when you’re working with it. With that experience you can move to larger projects later.

Refine your idea with Cardboard

My next advice will also save you time and money: create a mockup piece first.

In my early days I had very little money so I had to be thrifty with my leather and consumables. Cutting out pieces of cardboard from cereal boxes and seeing how my design folded, glue or stitched saved me a lot of time and pain.

Buying your Leather & Tools

This is the hard bit.

If you live in the UK, you can get your supplies from eBay, but I would suggest you have a look at LePrevo Leathers. They are a large supplier but they are friendly and helpful people.

For other sellers of tools, you can get everything you need on eBay fairly cheaply. Most of it will be made in China, but if you’re starting out, you shouldn’t spend a fortune unless you’re absolutely certain you want to commit to this craft. Otherwise, shop around.

If you’re elsewhere in the world, you will likely have more local suppliers. Particularly in Asian and American nations, you’ll have the likes of Tandy Leather. If you’re in the UK, avoid Tandy Leather, it is generally over priced under the facade of being user and newbie friendly. That said, if you’ve got cash to throw around, go ahead!

(That said, they have supposedly repriced everything, so maybe have a sneak peek)…

So that’s it for now, in the next week or so there will be part two ready to go. I’ll link it at the bottom of this page and notify via our Facebook page, twitter account and likely various other media platforms. Alternatively, subscribe to us to get notifications!

@FerrisWrites for Twitter

Our Facebook page

Next in the series we will look at a project in more detail, with steps on how to prepare and cut your leather to make a mask. It’s not rocket science and I’m sure there will be others with different ideas – that’s fine, lets put our heads together!

Until the next episode!

Mr Ferris

Themeborne: Those Rising Dark Stars…

If you’re familiar with Themeborne and Escape the Dark Castle, you can jump straight to the section entitled “Escape the Dark Sector!”, there’s a nifty banner to help you find it!

A couple of years ago I was cruising through Kickstarter town when I came across some great looking, creepy and nostalgic artwork. I investigated, sipping my breaktime tea to find a small tabletop card game… a very simple, pleasing to the eye game.

I read deeper into this game, Escape the Dark Castle (EtDC), and fell in love with it – at this point I hadn’t even played it, or read the rules enough to fully understand them… because it did something that most new games these days fail to do…

Create an immersive atmosphere.

Fast forward a year or so and the box lands at my door. I was surprised, because the game fit into a relatively small box, but that didn’t matter, not all great things come in huge packages (know what I mean?)

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

EtDC was made and published by Themeborn. Who are Themeborne, and what about their game makes it so engaging?

Themeborne are a small design studio located in Nottingham, UK. They have a small portfolio of games on their website, but it is one that is growing. Three individuals, each with very different skills as either a writer, artist and musician make up the studio. Whoever they are, it seems to create a perfect blend of creativity. Thomas Pike, Alex Crispin and James Shelton put their heads together and created this atmospheric and easily engaged card game.

They’re exploding onto Kickstarter again, this time for a space themed game, a spiritual successor to their first, with Escape the Dark Sector – more on this later!

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

So what is Escape the Dark Castle?

Imagine waking up in a cell, in the dark. Perhaps you’ve been there for months or years suffering torture and starvation. One day, the door to your cell is open. Several others blink as they walk out of their cells. Now, how do you escape?

With this premise, player’s characters encounter situations as they flee, sometimes given choices and other times being forced to fight monsters or jailors. The game is based on a deck of well presented cards, with the players either taking it in turns to reveal the next card or deciding amongst themselves who should draw the next.

These cards acts as chapters in their escape, detailing the story as they sneak, run and fight their way through various chambers and obstacles.

Specialist 6-sided dice are used to determine survival, with each character, such as the Bishop or the Cook, having their own character cards and special dice. When fighting or struggling to overcome an obstacle, the dice are rolled against the “chapter dice” which act as a randomised challenge. If your dice roll matches one of the chapter dice, you can remove it, hopefully whittling the monster away to move onto the next chapter… or die trying!

IMG_5007

Not equal, however – the dice are spit into might, wisdom and cunning and each character will have a better chance at rolling one or more of these attributes, meaning some combinations of characters can hinder the escape.

The chapter cards are drawn at random during game setup, meaning there is almost limitless possibilities in the escape story. Expansions to the game, which came out this year, means there are even more cards to randomly create the story.

And finally, as your make your get-a-way, you will encounter one of several special end of game enemies, each acting differently to immolate, terrify or devour the escapees.

The chances are you’re not going to make it, with less than  25% of our stories resulting in the characters escaping the dark castle! Why? Because if one of the characters dies, everyone loses and chances are that by the time you get to the ultimate encounter, you’ll be struggling already! The odds are not stacked in your favour… and it’s great!

etDC Kit

How does it feel?

Escape the Dark Castle has many great features, which I’ll go over briefly here. The important bit is that combined, these traits create a wonderful, narrative and enjoyable game play reminiscent of Knightmare, a UK kids TV show.

Easy to learn

The rule book is slim and easy to read with direct examples of how to play. The nature of the game focuses on getting started as a group and jumping into your first game. The storytelling aspect of EtDC means that just about everyone and their grandma can learn to play. Each player is encouraged to read out the chapter card they draw and are written in an old sword and sorcery style.

Quick as you like Pace

They say that the game takes 2 minutes to setup and around 30 minutes to play. I disagree with the 30 minutes but only because the game can be played as quickly or as slowly as you like. We’ve played many games of EtDC and frankly, when you’re sat around a table in a dimly lit room, the atmosphere suggests you take it slowly… but as you near the last chapter card, the pace quickens… almost as if you’re running blindly through a dark castle and can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Social, Inclusive, Cooperative

This is a game for everyone (assuming they can read, and even then, others can help). Because it is truly a cooperative game, where everyone or no one is a winner, it’s very easy to get involved. Who draws the next card can be decided democratically, people can look at the state of their character and think: I can’t survive another round of fighting! Others will openly declare that they can take whatever happens next, effectively ‘taking one for the team’ so there’s room for limelight too.

The inclusion of ‘equipment’ cards adds an extra dimension to the escapees: who will take the rusted sword, or who needs to eat the stale bread?

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game
Even Grandma can learn to play…

Variety

There are 45 chapter cards in the basic game, of which 11 are randomly drawn to create each story. The chances of drawing the same 11 cards each time are so astronomically low that you’d have to play thousands of games to get an exact same combination. But worry not, there are several expansions already out for EtDC and each one adds even more chapter cards, end of game bosses and even starting cards to the story. Cult of the Death Knight, Scourge of the Undead Queen and Blight of the Plaguelord are great additions, each one bringing more themes and story to your escape.

Value

With 3 expansions, a collector’s box, play mat, card sleeves, a book of character deaths (I know, right?) a story book and even an 80’s style musical cassette you’d be forgiven for thinking that the prices are going to match the likes of Fantasy Flight Games. Except that they’re not.

The Core game is priced at £30 – and this is truly all you need. The expansions, which you could buy several years down the line, are priced at £15 each and everything else is £20 or less, depending on what you want – Themeborne have made a great little game that is affordable and so re-playable you’ll never get to experience every possible combination of game.

And now they’re going a step further and taking us into the timeless void of space, where no one can hear you scream…

Escape the Dark Sector!

Escape the Dark Sector

ETDS Logo

Escape the Dark Sector is a science-fiction adventure, pitting the beleaguered crew of a ship against a detention block space station. Again, if anyone dies, the game is over, presumably because the ship can’t be flown without a full crew!

Themeborne suggest that the story and game-play comes from popular science fiction of the 80’s, including Alien, Startrek and Star Wars combined with the literary adventures of the amazing Fighting Fantasy novels and classic Dungeons & Dragons – much like Escape the Dark Castle!

Whether you like all of those titles or not, it seems there is something for everyone.

What’s different?

The core storytelling concepts from EtDC still run through Dark Sector, but Themeborne have introduced several new and easy to learn mechanics to the game and its setup. They make sense too, creating cinematic shootouts with aliens. So what’s new?

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

The Setup

The characters are familiar to those who played EtDC – each character has a dice specific to them to roll during actions and combat. However, adding onto the basic character concepts, players can choose ‘cybernetic implants’ which give their characters an edge in certain situations.

The story aspect has been developed to include not one single stack of story chapters and instead is now made up of three acts which, we’re told ups the tempo and intensity the deeper into the escape story the players drive their characters.

sci-fi science fiction sciencefiction themeborne escape alien starwars startrek star wars gothic punk dark tabletop game

The Gameplay

Since the theme of Dark Sector has catapulted the story into space, so too has the technology level, introducing tactical combat actions and  ranged combat.

Tactical combat actions include shooting, charging, reloading. re-equipping, and flanking, giving the game a much more tactical feel without detracting from the flow of the game. As is the way of Themeborne games, the action to charge is carried over for each character, meaning when one of you declares a charge, everyone has to go with them! It’s all or nothing!

Further, the action to heal some wounds can only be taken by one character at a time. No one gets to sit out for more than a round either. This seems to have upped the challenge! To balance this, certain actions such as reload or flank mean your character is not targeted by the enemy, but at least one character has to choose to fight or shoot. Actions come in the form of cards, where the character dice are placed in order to keep track more easily.

Ranged combat involves equipment and dice specifically related to the weapons, which, we’re told are not always positive effects for the characters. They seem to include ballistic, beam and explosive symbols, so no doubt each one comes with risks!

Some monsters and enemies are affected by or deal special damage depending on the type of ranged attack being made, so teamwork is still at the centre of the game mechanics – pile it up together or decide who should be shooting what weapon and you’ll crack the chapter and be able to move on!

If you want a copy of Escape the Dark Sector you’ll need to back the Kickstarter, there’s less than 40 hours left! Otherwise you can wait for the official release online, sometime next year!

Alternatively, you can grab yourself a copy of Escape the Dark Castle!

You can find the Kickstarter here

Themeborne website and shop

@FerrisWrites for Twitter and our Facebook page.

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – Fleeting Our Maker

Another week in paradise.

 

When you’re operating a fledgling wormhole corp and you really want it to grow, you need to tend to it often to stop things from going stale. Nobody wants to be in a dead corp, let alone join one.

 

I’ve learnt this only recently and have been trying my best to put in all the time I can to make things interesting for the amazing players we already have.

 

I’ll set the scene:

We have had a bit of a parasite problem recently. Getting camped in your home hole is no fun, especially when you can field a maximum of eight ships, most of which are T1 Cruisers and the person camping you is in a >1bil isk T3 Tengu. Bear in mind that eight is our maximum, on a good day, when everyone can get on.

Tengu fleet camp isk wingspan

Initially it frustrated me because everything slowed down to a crawl; we can’t set up our PI operation because they kill us, we can’t safely scan or haul because they kill us – our killboard is greener than the grass on the other side. Then as time goes on and you realise they aren’t going to leave you alone, you just have to learn to adapt. All these things are possible with the correct frame of mind and proper planning.

Eve fleet rolling bait megathron battleshi

So this week, that’s what we’ve learned to do – if you can’t beat the camper, learn to use them. It gave us the impetus to put together two fleet ops over the weekend, and I can heartily say that it was the most fun I’ve had in this game yet. Going in, I had no idea what I was doing and the same goes for most of my corp members, but we had fun, we undocked, shot stuff and learned a little. We are better now than we were a few days ago and I am beaming from ear to ear at that fact.

Fleet

Eve really is a game of attrition, you either adapt, learn and have fun or you quit, and as the title of these articles tells you, the latter is not an option. Another big lesson from being a CEO is that you have to be there when your corp needs you and you have to be prepared to organise things so everyone knows what’s going on. You can take a break, as long as everyone is kept in the loop, but you better be prepared to put the time in, step up and get things done when you come back.

Right now we’re in a better place than we have ever been and things are looking up for our little band of merry beards. I’m learning this game and learning to be a better leader, which is a profoundly satisfying experience.

Until next week my space dandies,

Fly safe.

 

Lizard – CEO of EternalCosmicBeardCorp

Lizard ship spaceship wormhole corp fly

Above: an accurate depiction of me scanning down the hisec.

ECBC are currently recruiting! Come and meet the gang! We have a serbian space maniac, a mysterious, yelling, smokey pig and our very own drunken frenchman! Oh, and also few players who actually know what they are doing, unlike me!

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game beard corp corporation

We’re learning together, with an aim to have fun in this insanely complicated game.

 

Discord: https://discord.gg/nzsBfuW

 

Evejobs: https://www.reddit.com/r/evejobs/comments/bvrmej/eternalcosmicbeardcorp_c4_wh_corp_euus_tz_newbro/

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – How Times Change.

It has been a while since my last article, but not to worry, Eve hasn’t beaten me yet.

 

The corporation has been steadily growing in organisational strength – there is a certain time where you realise that your endeavour must evolve from a fun little side project to one that will require a ton more time, I think now is that point.

Space hauler ship corp beginner new bro eve

I also trained into my first tier 2 ship! Not a super amazing combat ship; oh, no. It’s a hauler, which I found very amusing. I definitely have to prioritise the corp and ease of transport over shiny ships. I also recently trained into a tier 3 – which I was very surprised to find out aren’t necessarily better than tier 2 ships, they just have some funky features that allow them to be flexible. I only found out when it completed training however, that I trained into the wrong ship when setting up my skill queue – not such a bad thing when you have no idea what you’re doing!

Space fighter ship tier 3 eve online beginner corp wormhole

We began our journey in a Class 2 wormhole with very slim pickings when it came to neighbours, loot and things to do. It also didn’t help that we were besieged by another corporation for a solid week, which hit morale hard at a time when we were trying to really build up and organise.

 

However, after those hard few weeks, we made the move to a different wormhole which has a lot more to offer us in terms of profitability, fun and interesting neighbours and an element of secrecy and protection. Honestly it feels nice to finally call ourselves a Wormhole Corp.

Eve online base astrahus citadel corp wormhole beginner new

I am still trying to find more time to play, but that will come if I stay dedicated. I have had some of the most fun experiences in my gaming career with Eve and it’s all thanks to starting EternalCosmicBeardCorp.

 

The plan going forward is to set up some passive income with planetary interaction, start organising fleet ops and roams, form a cohesive doctrine for multiple situations, but most importantly to recruit some new Beards!

 

If you want a place to hang out and have some fun in this insanely complicated game, ECBC is a newbro and casual friendly Corp that emphasises the fact that we are all learning this together. We have some amazing people who are incredibly patient and we’re working on multiple guides to allow you to get to where you want to be as quick as possible.

Eve ship wormhole new player astero explore space game beard corp corporation

Also, our little community is very accepting, we all love just chatting about stupid things. A sense of humour is a must – we also have just implemented authentication by ESI, so keep that in mind, oh and please do have a working mic. We operate in the EU/US Time Zone.

 

We want you to undock with us, get scanning and get killing! We’re all in this together, and we’re all here to make Eve fun.

 

If you’re interested, hop on over to the discord and we can have a good chat:

 

https://discord.gg/nzsBfuW

 

Until next time,

 

Fly Safe.

 

Lizard – CEO

Give Sigmar a Chance: Why I’m giving Games Workshops ‘Age of Sigmar’ a Second Look…

Age of Sigmar is a tabletop war-game set in a fantasy world created by Games Workshop (GW). The game involves miniatures to represent warriors and monsters, with dices rolls used to represent the fray of battle as two or more players strive to defeat their opponents.

Warhammer Fantasy Battles (WFB) was the precursor to Age of Sigmar, and its development into the newer game was fraught with poor decision making and knee jerk reactions, with an unhealthy dose of corporate foolery.

I was a long time fan of Warhammer in its earlier and middle life. It was something I grew up with. Its strong sense of fantasy and rich lore was inspiring to a young boy, teenager and adult. As a nerd, it was a binding force among friends that ran alongside games like Dungeons & Dragons. It was a large part of our youth.

I took time out from Warhammer and GW they fell out of favour with me for many reasons. So when I heard about the new Age of Sigmar I was hopeful for a balanced and fun game. I felt let down and the following history tale feels like a terrible loss to something I held very dearly.

But I’m giving GW a second chance, and I’ll explain why later.

First, some history…

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures

The Lore Unflinching

Since its inception in 1983, Warhammer Fantasy Battle has been rich in its setting, abundant history and legends combined with inspiring artwork and grandiose tales. It was for the most part, a thing of beauty, the likes of which no other company had managed to create. WFB ran until 2010, with 27 years of added legends and story, enriching its own lore within each incarnation, eventually ploughing itself into an 8th and final edition.

However, a common complaint is that the story of the world never really advanced. Most of the rich storytelling, the history of the world, had already taken place. Global political and natural events had already shaped the world, from the war between Elves and Dwarves to the cataclysms that shaped the geography. With the exception of the incursions forces of Chaos (the ultimate big bad guys of the setting) very little else changed, and for 27 years humanity and its allies stood on the brink of extermination and extinction… yet was never quite defeated or victorious.

Arguably there’s a difference between the campaign world and the larger written fiction world: Despite gaps in the world, the GW development team failed to seize and advanced certain narrative arcs or historical campaigns, such as the War of the Beard, pitching Elves and Dwarves into a war that lasted years, creating offshoots of each nation / faction. Despite having untapped regions on the world map, it seemed that GW prematurely ran out of geographical room, never actually filling out all the regions in detail. The missed opportunities were vast.

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures

A Lore Uncopyrighted

WFB was expanded in the 80’s and as such borrowed much of its history and cultural ideas from Lord of the Rings which saw a rise in popularity and profile during that decade. Warhammer was generally considered a variant of many different stories and world settings at a time when copyrighting the name of a species wasn’t ever considered.

This borrowing of cultures and ideas meant that other, smaller companies were able to borrow in turn from GW. Being a large and successful company, GW didn’t like that idea. The prime example of this is the novel “Spots the Space Marinewhich GW wanted removed for copyright reasons. Owning ‘Space Marine’ for themselves was apparently critical to their business model.

When you considered how much GW borrowed from other media, you realise that much of their content was not their own. Copyrighting that content and cornering the market to their benefit was not possible with the old WFB lore. They would have to change everything… which Age of Sigmar does; the heart warming Elves, Dwarves, Goblins and Orcs were replaced with Aelves, Duardin, Grots and Orruk. It’s also hard to copyright historical figures and names, looking at you Bretonnian players!

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures

Compounding the Fractures

For new players, starting a game of Warhammer can be costly, with players investing their time and precious money into buying miniatures, paints, brushes, terrain boards and books to create their armies. If you just look at the price of the miniatures, you can spend hundreds of your precious monies before you’ve assembled anything. So when a game loses its appeal to old gamers, and new gamers can’t afford to start playing, sales begin drop and any company is likely to worry. But GW didn’t seem to learn with each new edition of WFB…

The 6th Edition of WFB was considered ‘alright’ in its early days for game balance. It still had its problems, much like any game. Unfortunately it was the start of the fall, where the final few Army Books published showed an increase in the power creep (where successive armies would be significantly tougher and cheaper to purchase in-game). Matching armies to play a fair game was harder and players started to emulate the winners creating a stale gaming style. Spending hundreds of pounds on an impressive army didn’t guarantee a satisfactory win/lose ratio.

7th Edition compounded on 6th edition and was the point in time when the famous (probably misquote) “We’re a miniature company not a games company” by the CEO of that time, Kirby. This was considered the primary unbalanced version of the game. This was also the time of the GW store changes, where a single member of staff was expected to run the store. This lead to an end of local store tournaments and a reliance on local independent gaming stores to do the hard work, which they were not prepared to do.

8th Edition simply added on top of this again, removing some parts of the game that required skill and understanding and replaced them with unbalanced armies and rules in totality.

 

Mat Ward held the creative reigns during these times of troubles and was supposedly responsible for the power creep of factions – most of the army supplement books were under his name which unfortunately lead to a loss in popularity. This lower-quality “modelling business” seems to have driven a core of players away, especially when GW tried to claim gamers only made up 20% of their sales (maybe they included digital games and fiction in those sales numbers, who knows). Still, 20% is a huge chunk of your market and not to be sniffed at.

The messiah Jedi to bring balance should have been 9th Edition and was rumoured to be an amazing game of fortitude and fun. However, some internet folks believe that this dropped the sales of the 8th edition as players saved their cash ready to spend it all in a glorious fit of nerd-frenzy… GW scrapped most of what 9th edition could have been. Frankly, GW had failed its panic test and bottled it, doing something so knee jerk worthy that many of their core fans and players simply stared in disbelief.

They killed it all off.

In an act of terrible corporate zeal, it was deemed unworthy and so all of it had to burn, apparently.

Warhammer 40K, the Expanding Galaxy

On the other hand, GW’s Warhammer 40,000 (40K) storyline moved onwards in the grim darkness of the 41st millenium. Players still flocked to it and it seemed always popular. Everyone loves “Spess Ma-reens!” So while WFB fell, GW put their time and effort into 40K. This lead to more delays and lethargy in creating content for WFB, hammering further nails into its coffin.

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures age of sigmar

Birth of the Mortal Realms, the Age of Sigmar

It was expected that 9th edition was going to mend itself, bandage its blood spouting wounds, stick on an eye patch and throw itself back into the fight for the old world with a grizzled low growl. But with the panicked reaction from a slump in sales, GW rushed ahead with Age of Sigmar and dumped the Old World. The lore and world history of WFB was abolished, the relics and lessons of the Old World were forgotten and the new world, the world of Mortal Realms was born.

Many fans were outraged (I mean, it is the internet) and a solid core of supporting players felt abandoned and ignored. No doubt many miniatures ended up in the bin, or left to fend for themselves Toy Story style in a box of Barbie dolls… or likely ended up on eBay.

Warhammer now looked like something from Magic the Gathering, minus the charm.

So why, after the loss of something held very dear, am I giving Age of Sigmar and Games Workshop another chance?

warhammer games workshop fantasy battles oldhammer tabletop game miniatures age of sigmar

Age of Sigmar

The new game is very accessible and despite frankly large problems, holds promise. The core rules are completely free and readily available online to print out yourselves.

Now you can play the game as a narrative (discard point values for armies) or you can carry out matched play, where you decide on the points values for your forces. This means you can tailor games for competitions or story driven wars.

A Battle Narrative

The revived and quick to learn rules have given GW a chance at another shot to regain the glory of the old days – quite simply it’s a shame they had to destroy everything the fans loved about the setting (but all is not lost). Games are now played in scenarios. This put me off originally, because I love a good ruck in the mud with swords and death, but actually, scenarios allows me to play a relatively weak force (High Elves, who are now Swifthawk Riders) against an incredibly overpowered force (such as the Beastclaw Raiders) and hopefully run rings around them, because no army is able to be perfect in a randomly determined scenario.

Embers of the Old World

Thankfully, GW are still publishing fiction related to the Old World. They’ve even gone back further and re-released fiction before the time of Karl Franz (the emperor with the big hammer at WFB peak). Third parties such as Cubicle 7 have brought fresh life to the Old World with a renewed and updated version of the Warhammer Fantasy Roleplaying Game (we had a peek early on here…) and God’s bless the Creative Assembly for sticking with the Old World in their very successful Total War: Warhammer series (which merges two of my favourite things wonderfully).

And finally… Gotrek Gurnison lives! The doom-seeking Slayer wandered out of the time warping Chaos Wastes of the Old World to bring some good old fashioned Slayer perspective in Realm Slayer. Gotrek quests through the Mortal Realms to find his manling sidekick, Felix Jaeger, who may have been reincarnated as a Stormcast Eternal! This is a great tale that sets the scene for Age of Sigmar and throws us veteran players a much desired connection to the World that Once was.

Gotrek Gurnison Felix Jaeger troll salay beast slayer everything slayer

So, like with the new Star Wars movies – the new stuff doesn’t invalidate the old stuff – you can still read and watch the old stories and enjoy them for what they are. You can do the same for Warhammer.

GW took a huge gamble which seems to have paid off.

At least for now…

Absolutely Final Bit

If you keep up to date with the acts of GW and their Age of sigmar game, you may want to take a look at this petition that is over five years old. If you read it you’ll see that most of what the petition was asking for has actually been met by the GW. Shame they never actually replied to the petition…

https://www.change.org/p/games-workshop-limited-refocus-your-business-model-on-the-sale-of-a-game-and-support-of-a-gaming-community-vice-the-pure-sale-of-collectible-miniatures

That about wraps it up for now! Thanks for reading, and as ever, your comments and discussion are always welcome. perhaps you know something we don’t and would like to share your thoughts?

@FerrisWrites for Twitter and our Facebook page.

Interested in table top terrain crafting?

Warhammer Fantasy role-playing?

Looking for a cool army list builder, Battlescribe?

Thinking of buying from Forge World?

If you’re meme game is high, check out ‘2+Tough and re-rolling ones

Tabletop War-Game Terrain & Scenery: Getting your Hands on the Materials

Over the last few weeks I’ve been offering tips, hints and advice on creating tabletop terrain for wargames such as Warhammer Age of Sigmar, Warhammer 40K and Skirmish-style games such as Frostgrave. The feedback, comments and notifications I’ve received have had an underlying theme; where do you get your supplies from in the UK?

Being in the UK, many of the materials we see used online do not seem to be available to us. So, I’ve decided to create a comprehensive list of the tools, materials and where I sourced them from. This should hopefully give you a better idea of what you’re looking for and how to get hold of them.

Here goes…

Tools of the Trade

Knives, Blades & Cutting Mats

I’m not going to go into too much detail here as, chances are, you know where to buy crafting knives. The places I think do reasonably priced craft knives are places like The Range, Wilko (Wilkinson’s) and the like (some of these places are relatively new to the north-west UK). That said, some hobby and craft supply stores do tend to charge an arm and a leg for their products, so shop around. I’ve often found supermarkets can surprise you with some cheap, good quality craft knives. A couple of GBP should get you something sensible

Wilkinson’s do a good range of affordable tools, disposable knives being one of them.

The same can apply for cutting mats. I tend to get the SpaceFly brand because they’re cheap, available all over the place and come in a range of sizes and colours. The best place for cutting mats? I actually find Amazon works best. Try to avoid the rotary cutting mats – they’re thinner and not as robust. In my experience, they tend to slip about too.

Hot-wire Cutters

If you want to be cutting bricks from foam or saving yourself from buying a tonne of extra blades, then a hot wire cutter is something you should consider. There’s two thoughts I have on this; cheap is fine, expensive isn’t necessary.

I started with a cheap, basic, hand made hot wire cutter from eBay which set me back about £35. It does the job and you get what you pay for. If you’re flashing cash, you could go for the Proxxon version but in reality, you don’t need to. I upgraded recently to a hot-wire cutter made in China and sold in the UK, from eBay which set me back just over £60. It comes with an pretty accurate set of measuring points, the wire doesn’t flex too much and is held in place neatly. It also cuts faster by having a hotter wire.

Paints, Inks, Washes & Brushes

Again, there’s not much point in going into detail here. If you’re making terrain you don’t need to buy expensive paints. So long as they’re acrylic and mat finish paints, you can buy the cheapest you can find. Art shops are a good place to go, but they will stock more expensive brands, so again, try shops like Wilkinson, the Range and Hobby Craft.

The same applies for brushes. For finer detail paints or highlighting you want a medium sized and soft brush. For mass painting or large areas or slapping on paints and sealers like Mod Podge, a large coarse brush is fine. You can usually get sets with a good variety. Same rules apply; you can buy expensive or cheap, the difference is that one you will replace more frequently but that’s perfectly natural for paint brushes.

More on washes later…

Glue & Glue Guns

Mini glue guns are best. You can get them for less than £5 and the glue sticks online, especially eBay, are sold by the 100 for a couple of GBP. You can go a little more up market here if you have the budget – cheap glue guns will tend to dribble  the hot glue between uses unless you turn it off and on again (which takes time to heat up, so I tend to leave them on as I work).

With PVA glue – the price reflects the water content. Expensive means thicker and stronger, cheap means more water but likely quicker to dry and easier to paint on. Again, buy what you can afford, but for the terrain making, you can buy the cheap stuff and no one will ever know! The great thing about PVA glue is that you can thin it down with water (which for the most part, is free).

Foam, XPS & Styrofoam

The crux of this article. Let’s get something straight. In the US & Canada, XPS foam comes in pink or blue colours and is readily available in large quantities. In the UK however, it seems to be nowhere. That is because over here in the UK we call XPS foam, Styrofoam. XPS is the abbreviation for Extruded Polystyrene – it is basically a very strong, durable but craftable foam which does not bend. EPS, which is expanded polystyrene is the stuff that your electrical goods get boxed in, the white stuff which looks like it has been made out of thousands of tiny bubbles.

Styrofoam / XPS is available mostly online through eBay. I tend to use the supplier named Blue Foam, found here. Depending on the thickness and sheet size, you can get a reasonable amount of Styrofoam for less than £20. This is the material I commonly buy and use to create bricks and bases for my terrain buildings.

You could buy from a hardware or DIY store but I’ve yet to find it in an affordable or ready to use format. If you have found it, please let me know!

Foamstock, Card & Paper

Foamstock is just a piece of foam front and backed with paper. It’s used to mount photographs amongst other junior school crafts. Again, you can get it just about anywhere but the cheap stuff is fine to use and available in pound shops!

I use card recycled from postal packaging. When you buy a book from Amazon they usually turn up in a thin but sturdy card envelope. This stuff is strong and durable and ideal for detailing terrain miniatures. I use it for cutting roof tiles / shingles.

Paper. It’s just paper!

Measuring Rules

I tend to buy rulers and squares from Wilkinson’s or the Range. You may need to dig deep in store to find them. For £20 you should be able to get good quality steel rulers etc that will last you years. Not bad for a small initial outlay!

The God that is Mod Podge!

Yep, this stuff is amazing. It’s not just a fancy PVA glue. No. It is terrain divinity. It dries with more toughness and water repellent properties than PVA, because it contains resins which act as a sort of easy to use concrete. No terrain made from foam should be made without it!

The best news is that you can now buy it in UK shops readily. I first bought some online, but recently found it cheaper in the Range. Not even Hobby Craft had it in stock last time I checked!

Making Decent Wash…

You’ll notice a lot of people create their own washes for terrain. A wash is a water-thin paint that is applied liberally to a miniature which, as it dries, recedes into the recesses of the model to create shadows. It’s a miracle product!

The problem for terrain crafting is that you need a lot of it, and frankly it can be expensive (looking at you, GW)! So here’s how to make your own – keep in mind, if you buy these products you’ll be able to make litres of wash and you can modify them for varied results…

What you will need:

  • Artist Ink (black and brown usually)
  • Mat Medium (essentially colourless paint)
  • Water (deionised is best)
  • A bottle container or two
  • A smidge of washing up liquid

Now, there are literally hundreds of tutorials online to show you how to make washes, so I’m not going to repeat them here, I will however share a link to a really helpful guy who knows a bit more about painting than I do, meet Luke!

If you’d like to read on the previous articles, you can find them in the links below:

Tabletop War-Game Terrain & Scenery: Bombastic Buildings and Fantastic Features – Creating your Tabletop Battlefield

TABLETOP WAR-GAME TERRAIN & SCENERY: Part two, the basic steps

Tabletop War-Game Terrain & Scenery Part Three: Putting it all Together

If you’re on Facebook or Twitter you can find us in these links, where we post often, so you’ll get notifications if you follow us:

Twitter @FerrisWrites or @TheCConsortium

Facebook page!

In the next few weeks I’ll be looking at making trenches, futuristic and alien terrain pieces (Mars was requested) and possibly upping my painting game!

If you think this article or related articles have been helpful, or if you want to contribute with some knowledge of your own, get in touch and leave or comment or get hold of us on Twitter or Facebook!

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me – Growing Pains.

I think I’m getting this game; finally. When you first start playing, everything is so overwhelming that you become so sure that it’s almost impossible to know enough to fulfill the criteria in your head that would lead you to class yourself as “competent” – it’s as unattainable in those first few weeks as flapping your arms and flying to the moon.

 

Then, when you surround yourself with good people and put the time into fitting ships and getting blown up again and again but learning, then you start to see how things fit together, how you need a fleet composed of specific ships to do specific things if you want to beat actual people. Fighting NPCs is similar, but the human is the most fierce prey, ha.

 

We have a good number of people in the corporation now, to the point where I think we’re done with the first round of recruitment: let’s see how many of our amazing people can deal with my sub-par leadership to make it to phase two! Which shall be kicking off in little more than a month.

 

The project is going a lot smoother than I expected; the whole idea was to get people playing the game, interacting and having fun without a strict corp structure and scheduling – these things will still exist for events and fleet ops etc, but I have no interest in enforcing lots of imaginary rules in an imaginary game.

images

Other than that, we’re staring at our skill queue, waiting for doctrine ships to train so we can all go ratting as a fleet and rake in the monies.

 

Just a quick update for a standard week in the life of a know-nothing CEO. Until next time, fly safe.
Boboko Busanagi of EternalCosmicBeardCorp.