Category Archives: Where we begin

Eve Online Will Not Beat Me.

I’ve been an Eve Online player for over ten years. I’ve had two separate accounts on two separate occasions. I’ve been part of corporations with thousands of members and participated in fleet battles where space station-sized ships owned by players have warped in while I goggled in surprise and wonder. I’ve plumbed the depths of player owned space on my own, under the noses of others in better equipped ships with far more skill at the game; hunting for secret relics and hidden caches of valuable items, all while frantically looking over my shoulder for player hunters and occasionally running for my life when they found me.

eve online space station new player

There’s a lot to do in Eve and I’ve done a lot of it, but I can honestly say that I have never understood the game.

 

It’s such a strange experience because it’s such a vast experience. The game is played with everyone all being on the same server. The mostly player-run economy means that you can make a living doing anything you want: mining, salvaging, battling, exploring, war with other players and much more. You undock from a station and every time you are confronted by everything and it’s so intimidating, even for a gamer like me who has spent hundreds of hours grappling with Dwarf Fortress.

 

The menus in Eve are complicated, the combat, the movement, the player interaction; everything presents you with numbers and ratios and systems with nested subsystems and to be competitive you absolutely need to atleast understand them.

eve online mining new

 

This is what keeps bringing me back and also what keeps me away. There are no amount of tutorials that can prepare you for what awaits as the game eventually spits you out and says “go and do stuff”. It’s a profoundly baffling experience if you’re on your own.

 

Ofcourse, guides tell you again and again to join a player group, or “Corp” and yes, it’s true that this is by far the best approach to learning the game if you are confident enough. But if you’re not, or you feel like your schedule won’t match up with others, or any number of reasons why you might not want to join a player group while you’re still learning the game, then Eve won’t hold your hand. You’ll need to read and read a lot.

 

But for all that, you can’t ever get away from the fact that you’re playing a true space sim, set in a living and breathing universe where real humans go about their tasks with goals and ambitions. There are pirates and danger around every corner. Real intrigue between real people who head huge organisations who run regular missions with real goals. What other game ever made can boast that level of persistence and completeness? The immersion is both minimal, as you tab out or grab your phone every five minutes to check up a rule, or stat, and simultaneously tremendous as you desperately try and lose a pirate who wants nothing more than to kill you and take your stuff.

eve online pirate hunter new player how

The game is about control and Eve puts everything and the kitchen sink into your hands and says “tell me what you’re going to do with it”. Even playing the game is a challenge that you must overcome, and who every player also logged in either has or is still in the process of overcoming. What a unique thing to be a part of.

 

So take your WoWs, your Guild Wars, your Fortnites. I need Eve. In the articles that will follow, I shall hopefully bring you all the trials and tribulations of a Newbro trying to make it in a big universe.

 

To be continued,
Boboko Busanagi, CEO of EternalCosmicBeardCorp. (We’re new, and recruiting!)

Is Playing DnD Online Better Than In Real Life?

A new game of Dungeons and Dragons is always a nerve-wracking event as a Dungeon Master. There is so much to do, especially if you want to write your own adventure. Then you have to consider your players, you never really know what they are going to do, or if the content you’ve written will be “enough”.

Well last night I embarked upon a new campaign, written in about a week, using a digital tabletop which I’d never used before (I also haven’t ran many campaigns online), with an entire party of players I didn’t know. I don’t think it’s possible to present a DM with more of a psychological or physical challenge.

And frankly it was one of the best sessions I’d ever had.

This article is an attempt to get more people into DnD online. As a DM, you invest so much time and effort that it can be hard to step out of your comfort zone, but this session reminded me why that’s important.

We used Roll20: the free virtual tabletop which provides an absolute ton of functionality and really brings you as close as you can possibly come to being around a table. The dice roller even lets you roll big 3D dice!

https://roll20.net

As the DM, I found that every little need I had was met: I could set up encounter tokens, NPCs, new maps, handouts and even track initiative on the tabletop. This allowed me to involve the players in every part of my preparation. They could see the gears in motion so the session never really stalled or lost pace when I was setting up the next encounter.

For tracking characters we used DnD Beyond. An amazing official website by Wizards Of The Coast, which basically gives you every tool and rule to set up a campaign and actually play it. The site requires an entire article of its own, but suffice it to say that as a DMs and character’s toolbox, this site has it all.

https://www.dndbeyond.com

Then lastly we come to my players. I was so nervous about these guys, I’d never met any of them before, we just set up the game on a discord server I frequent before christmas then last night, there we were, confronted by a whole slew of new experiences.

As a DM, you always hope that your players are going to “get” your game, and certainly I was worried that my game style wasn’t necessarily going to be compatible with how they wanted to play. My fears turned out to be completely unfounded, as they really got their teeth into my session in a way that made the effort totally worth it!

This proves to me, that playing DnD online, with strangers is not such a daunting task as it used to be. The free tools are so good these days that you hardly feel divorced from the table. It certainly opened my eyes and I hope you give it a chance too! Especially if you can’t give up the time and effort it takes to get together with people on a particular day. As a 29 year old who works odd hours, that’s become of great concern to me in recent years, so last night’s session was almost a weight off my mind:
As long as you have a computer, you can play DnD.

Until next time,

Fozzie.

Game Design: An Exercise In Friendship.

Hello, all.

Fozzy here from creator consortium. I’m aiming to bring you an article on games design, or rather, the summation of my experience at designing our in-house tabletop role playing game; Pulp RPG.

It started some months ago, between Ferris and I. We’re prone to flights of fancy, in fact it has been the defining feature of our friendship as far as I am concerned, and something I am very glad of. There is nobody else in the world who I can pool my enthusiasm with like I can with Mr Ferris. We’ve both designed systems before, many on the back of napkins, so to speak, some make it a little further. I know he developed a very nice little system he plans to convert to Pulp later down the line, but I digress.

We’ve never gotten this far before. We have a tangible, working system that feels as if it lives and breathes before our eyes. It stands apart from us now, as its own entity; maybe rough around the edges, it’s face will change over the years, but it’s exciting and I think I know why.

The reason we were able to get this far is because we were able to harness those long conversations, temper the streams of consciousness into a honed blade. You spend so long talking about something that it no longer makes sense, and many times this was the case with our game. Yet every time that happened, we resolved to take a step back and pluck from the haystack those needles of brilliance (in our eyes) that allowed us to produce something we both see as worthy now, we established rules and clear goals at the start of the process and never deviated from their mandate.

The lessons taught were simple: to let your mind run away with possibility, but to always slash away at those ideas until the good ones emerge. To be hard on yourself as well as each other, to never compromise on something you feel is right, but never try to compromise the other in what they think is right.

The above sounds like an exercise in futility, but we did it. I feel it is a testament to the kind of friendship we have and the kind of honesty we share with each other that has helped us to go further with a project than we ever have before. It’s also the reason why we’re going to succeed in bringing our game to people’s tables. It almost feels inevitable.

And so I write, and he writes;  sometimes completely separately from the other, because we know what is expected. Because we worked hard to trim and to smash away the marble to build a streamlined core that can always be referenced, that we built, and it feels good.

As we go forward with our myriad projects, I think that is the main idea we want to keep front and centre: that every move forward must look back on who we are, to remember what is to be achieved by our partnership and whether each step works towards the principals you set out at the start. And to have fun with the creative process, and to make some of that fun being harsh when it comes to editing.

I enjoy writing more rambling articles. I feel like I put too much pressure on “having something to write about”, when I enjoy writing so much more when I find that something when I’m writing it, so expect more of these from me.

Happy gaming,
Fozzy.

Opening Lines from stories of the last century – why you should master them!

“Frank; what can be more self-inspiring than the opening lines of your own novel?” – I’m not sure I cracked this first time, but here’s how your opening lines can be great if you’re willing to learn from the some of the classical heroes of literature.

All the best first lines in literature are vivid, granting us a clear image which kicks starts the story in a tone that carries us forward.

But how do they do it? What sort of ideas can you use to inject a fist full of Bruce Lee punchiness to your opening lines? Well I’ve got some ideas for you, with examples from my favourite fiction authors in horror, fantasy and adventure fiction, proving that one hundred year old ideas can still be used across genres and in modern writing.

What is a perfect opening line?

The perfect opening lines need to grab us, they need to open their broad arms and tell us that we’re to expect something more, warm arms that wrap around us and make us cosy up to the fact that we’re going on a journey. They may not need to set the tone of the whole story, but they need to grab us and either draw us in with succulent words or punch us in the face and toss us into the inferno.

Your ABCs

Some simple tips for your opening lines:

The most basic step is to name a character. Naming someone makes aspects of the content real for us from the moment we start reading. Got that Frank?

Now that we have named that fellow, it helps to see what they’re doing. Creating an action provides us with the sense of motion of going forward, even if it’s the most mundane action in the world like breathing. Frank, put that coffee down and come over here.

Next, we’re going to dabble in a bit of emotion, ideally something we can all relate to. Since we’re all humans (I guess you may not be?) we all feel, and we want to be sympathetic with the character. Sit down Frank and wipe that stupid grin from your face.

Combining these elements may not give the best or most exciting opening, but many great authors use the same ideas and ramp them up to a magnitude of thousand. We’re going to take a look at how writers tackle their opening lines, some modern and some from nearly a hundred years ago!

Howard's Conan

Here’s a classic example from The Pool of the Black One by Robert Howard, original author of the Conan tales circa 1920s:

“Sancha, once of Kordova, yawned daintily, stretched her supple limbs luxuriously, and composed herself more comfortably on the ermine fringed silk spread on the carrack’s poop-deck.”

In this grandiose opening line, we get a name, a title of sorts then an action followed by a second action and so on. I love this opening line because we get so much in one sentence that there’s no question who we are looking at; a woman with a mysterious background who is at ease and likely familiar with the finer things in life, probably a pirate!

But what if you want to set the tone in more depth?

To really highlight a sense of foreboding some authors use a hindsight perspective. This hindsight gives the reader a sense of time passed and already conjures notions in our mind that we’re to expect more. This perspective makes us ask questions without really giving us enough details. We simply want more. I draw your attention to Herbert West – Reanimator by Lovecraft, from the same era as Robert Howard:

“Of Herbert West, who was my friend in collage and in other life, I can speak only with extreme terror.”

This is a classic opening from Lovecraft which crunches familiar ideas together in a great juxtaposition; ‘friend in collage and other life’ and ‘extreme terror’ are not usual bedfellows. When I first read this line I was a little stunned – what happened to these two friends to invoke such terror?

Lovecraft’s voice here is very formal, we’re probably reading a journal or a confession, but also remarkably relaxed, as if the author has come to terms with whatever happened and reflects on past deeds.

Lovecraft also states these things as facts.

Simple facts, or even complex ones can hammer home the nature of your story. One of the strangest factual opening lines I’ve read, for its mundanity, comes from Dennis Wheatley’s The Forbidden Territory:

“The Duke de Reichleau and Mr Simon Aron had gone in to dinner at eight o’clock, but coffee was not served till after ten.”

Wheatley’s opening line gives us the very simplest of tips mentioned earlier; names and actions. What strikes interest here, other than the mundanity is the fact that there’s a gap in the timescale. Most of us wouldn’t question a two-hour gap for eating, but in this post-war era the inference is that something went on; a long discussion perhaps, or an unexpected guest. It makes us question what happened and is the simplest pull into a story.

Lovecraft Stories

Being Vague

Running the same theme of factual storytelling, Anne Rice, a vivid writer with a clean voice started Tales of the Body Thief with these very simple lines:

“The Vampire Lestat here. I have a story to tell you. It’s about something that happened to me.”

If the reader is familiar with Rice, Lestat is an old Vampire with several hundred years under his belt. Lestat’s informal voice comes from his adaptation to the modern world, like we’re supposed to know him. Indeed, this isn’t the first Lestat novel but it captures Lestat’s lazy and disregarding nature of mortals (which he desperately wants to recapture). So, Rice gives us a name but there’s no action! This is fine, because in a very blatant but well executed introduction, we know there’s a story to tell here. Again, the hindsight perspective works nicely to draw us in.

One last example of using unknown past circumstances comes from Robert Jordan’s The Eye of the World one of many Wheel of Time books:

“The palace still shook occasionally as the earth rumbled in memory, groaned as if it would deny what happened.”

Simple questions arise. More vague, check out the opening line to Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte:

“There was no possibility of taking a walk that day.”

You can’t really get more vague – if this was Face Book I’d expect a lot of typical ‘U ok Hon’ type responses, but this is literature and we like vague; it makes us want to know; why?

What about real Action?

Hitting the reader with real, hardcore action works well in adventure style literature and can be as simple as the following, from Shadows in the Moonlight, another one of Howard’s classic sword & sorcery:

“A swift crashing of horses through tall reed; a heavy fall, a despairing cry.”

Here we are told very little, but the imagination is fired up; why are the horses crashing through a reed bed? I suspect there’s water so it’s hard work for horse and rider so must be important. Who or what fell heavily? Who cried out in desperation? Chances are this is the result of conflict, perhaps someone has escaped or is being chased? Less than fifteen words and we’re right into the action and already asking questions.

What about using the unusual?

Unusual openings are a great way to confuse and entice readers, but they must be concise so as to avoid convoluted circles which can lose your audience. I’ll draw from Lovecraft (Call of Cthulhu) and Howard (Shadows of Zamboula) for two examples.

“The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents.”

Here Lovecraft poses a statement with a hint of reflection. What contents of the human mind are we trying to correlate? The vague hints at something deep can start the mind turning! From Howard:

“Peril hides in the house of Aram Baksh!”

Here Howard makes it very clear that there’s an element of danger, whether we believe the statement or not. The fact that it is spoken word and not narrative drops us into a place of uncertainties; who do we trust, the opinion of the speaker or the fact of a statement? We also have a name and a location – the ABC’s at work. The undertone of emotion (peril, danger or horror) tempts us with the thrill of a something we should probably avoid but can’t help but read – we’re all insects buzzing closer to that blue light in a day dream. speaking of dreams, Lovecraft’s The Silver Key:

“When Randolph Carter was thirty he lost the key of the gate of dreams.”

Here Lovecraft is suggesting there is a place that is a literal door to dreams. It implies more than the normal world without having to explain with exposition what on earth is going to happen. It is unusual but also includes elements of naming and action (in the loss of something) as well as giving us a snippet of description for Mr Carter. Added to this, we ask the question: how did the character get into this?

Call of Cthulhu

Finally, formality

As mentioned before, Rice uses Lestat’s voice to bring us in close enough to get bitten by giving the vampire an informal tone. We’re expecting perhaps blood and violence right away, instead we’re given a friendly talking to, perhaps imagined on the TV screen or the phone.

The narrators voice can also be twisted to formality or otherwise to give us some perspective, allowing to see more story without literally writing it in. Another great example from Lovecraft’s Pickman’s Model:

“You needn’t think I’m crazy, Eliot – plenty of others have queerer prejudices than this.”

Here we’re being pulled into why the narrator struggles with underground transport, but we don’t really know why, and in true Lovecraftian style we’re pulled slowly and inexorably to the climax of the horror – things lurk – which the narrator never wishes to comprehend again, but we’re going to read about it and understand why.

Not Quite the beginning

A second point of interest is that Lovecraft didn’t start right at the beginning of Pickman’s Model. Rather, he started just after the beginning of the conversation between the narrator and Eliot. Yet another great way to make your start interesting. Some of the previous examples do this too – we’re trying to draw our reader in. Ever heard the phrase ‘What’s in the box!?’ well that’s what we’re tapping into when we start not quite at the beginning.

Where does the learning come in?

We’ve pointed out some great opening lines and investigated what makes them good. To get into practice of creating great opening lines you should probably consider these last few bits of advice:

  • Write your opening lines last – no one wrote a great opening line first time. Much like any other aspect of writing, you’ll probably need to plan your writing rather than trying to create the best opening line right away.
  • Read lots of great opening lines, even if you don’t read all of the book. If you have access to books, jot down a few opening lines each day and dissect them like you’re a pathologist of words. You’ll soon start to see what makes great opening lines and not. Goosebumps are a good sign!
  • If in doubt, try, try again. You’ll not this get this right first time, maybe not even second or third time. Get advice from friends and fellow authors (this bit can be hard for closet writers!) Feedback is key, as you’ll not be buying your own book!

Now that you’ve got a better idea about what makes a great introduction or opening line, have another go yourself, even if you’re nowhere near finishing your novel or story. It can be self-inspiring and refreshing to have a go.

Go forth and kindle those flaming juices of imagination!

I’m going to start on my opening line for this article…

J.D Ferris, CC

CC’s Free Pulp RPG – Peeking at Character Creation and why it’s easy to pick up

Today we’re going to give you a sneaky look at character creation for CC’s Pulp RPG.

There are a few very simple criteria about how we design things, here’s the major one; character creation must be simple and swift so as to be friendly for your new players, yet possess infinite customization with levels of depth for your more experienced players. To tackle this problem, we considered all manner of mechanics but we’ve settled on a few solid ones.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So, let’s get into it…

There are four attributes which will be familiar to players of RPGs but we’ll go into a  bit of detail here. The power level is unlike most styles of RPGs and since most pulp fiction characters are simple humans we feel the need to stress this. In Pulp RPG there are four main attributes that make up a character:

The physical attribute describes your athletic ability as a whole; shooting requires physical effort to aim and stay steady, running long distances is tiring, swimming through river rapids is difficult, and holding open a stone trapdoor requires technique and brawn – all these describe your physical attribute, sort of a doing statistic.

Intellect covers elements from academic learning, logical reasoning, to understanding sciences and engineering. Recalling ancient lore, deciphering complex codes, repairing a vehicle and understanding schematics – all these describe your intellect attribute, a sort of thinking statistic.

The charisma attribute describes your social acumen. Being heard over an argument, convincing others to help, wooing another person or calming a spooked horse. Charisma is almost always a competitive roll and acts like your characters presence in the room..

Finally, the luck attribute – which is used during the game to turn aside a poor result, avoid catastrophe or really hammer home a good shot. The luck attribute is also rolled in games sessions where pure chance can make you feel lucky, such as when determining which character is going to be targeted by an enemy. In these situations, rolling the dice of the luck attribute means the lowest score loses the contest and becomes the target of the attack.

Luck also plays another important part during the game for the little things; is that guard looking in my direction? Roll your luck dice pool and let’s see how fate decides! In this way, the excitement can be shared by the players and the games master without derailing the story or side stepping role-play.

UNK1_0005

At character creation a player decides which of their attributes will be their characters best, good, average and poor attributes, which confer 4 dice, 3 dice, 2 dice and 1 dice respectively to their dice pools. It may sound a little restrictive but at character creation it can be very quick to decide what sort of character you wish to play and gives each character a known balance. The infinite customization comes in the next section; character skills.

Character Skills

We’re still working on the skills a character can take, but the idea is relatively simple; you choose your skills based on a broad spectrum of a life role or profession. A character has several skills depending on their Intellect attribute. Here’s an example based on a character who is a farm worker:

  • Farming Know-how – crop rotations, irrigation systems, flora and fauna knowledge.
  • Mechanics – the ability to repair or modify vehicles on the farm.
  • Animal Welfare – to care for livestock in all forms with simple veterinary skills
  • Firearms – to guard and protect the land or livestock from predators or thieves.

Its important to note that skills are not specific to any single attribute, instead they are fluid meaning that a physically weak character may be able to think their way out of the box.

Getting across a cavern is rarely a simple physical task, sometimes you have to use brains to determine the best point to jump, the right angle and speed to jump from, be warned though; if you stretch the concept too far and you risk the idea backfiring; try and suggest you can charm your way across is doomed to fail!

UNK_0015

That about covers today’s development blog. Over the next couple of days we’ll give you some insight into basic and competitive rollinginitiative and combat.

Stay tuned and we’ll give you some more meaty bits as the week comes to an end!

J.D. Ferris, C.C

CC’s Free Pulp RPG core pulls together

Like the Blob our plans are coming together and no amount of pump-action shells or nitrogen based coolants are slowing it down, so don’t even try!

This week we have been working hard to bring you the core mechanics of the Pulp RPG. As we draw nearer to the completion of the core rules we’re happy to report that our minds are already racing towards the modules, which will bring the game to life.

Our promised “Chasing Zombie Hitler Through Panama In 1948” module will be the focus of our designing endeavors over the next few weeks, but first we’re going to give you a sneak peak into the core mechanics of the game.

The core mechanics will act as the skeleton crew, with adventure modules fleshing out the rest of the mechanics to round off the game. This helps us design a game which is different for the various eras of adventures we’re bringing to you, yet making a switch from one game to another effortless for the players and GM alike.

Our eras will cover all sorts of pulp titles, ranging from a million years BC, the sword & sorcery age, through to modern times and beyond, into the land of martians, creature-features and all the best that the silver screen ever brought to us.

AMZ2_0016

So, our alpha stage system, what’s it like?

We’re using the iconic six sided dice.

Why?

Because just about anyone who has looked at a board game in their life knows what we’re talking about. Chances are they have spare ones and we like that you don’t need to go out and spend some cash on getting fancy dice (well, unless you want to).

No need to add up those dice or handle too much mathematics!

Players will create pools of six-sided dice (D6) based on one of four attributes; physical, intellect, charm and luck. Characters will also add dice for having relevant skills, or no skill dice at all!

The GM sets the difficulty of the task the character is trying to perform as a number to get on one or more dice. Success is measured on how many of those dice score equal to or more than the difficulty. Here’s an example:

Tom raider Jones is leaping to roll under a falling stone door. He is quite athletic with 4 dice in his physical attribute. The games master (GM) say’s the rock door is falling fast but the gap is quite wide still, Jones will need to roll 4 or better on any of his dice.

Jones jumps – the player rolls his 4D6 and scores: 2, 3, 4 & 4. Jones makes the jump, rolling two successes on his dice (the 4s). With each success dice, the positive effect is amplified, the opposite is done for rolling 1s!

FAN1_0008

That’s about all we’re willing to share for today, but over the next few days we’ll be posting about character creation, competitive rolling, initiative and combat, along with some snippets from our first adventure module.

We’ll keep you posted, but check back for more exciting action from CC’s Pulp RPG!