Category Archives: Pulp RPG

How to Draw RPG Maps – Part 1, Dungeon Maps

(Step by Step)

Over the last few weeks, I’ve been tackling a growing problem in my role-playing gaming sessions – maps.

Maps can really bring your game to life, focus the players and help keep track of locations and events as the game progresses. The problem, however, is that if you’re not 100% confident of your drawing skills, you may be disinclined to draw your own or pay someone to use theirs. This is fine, but you’ll likely not get a dungeon map in the style or layout that you want.

So this is where my practice comes in: you can read the following and hopefully learn a few tricks and see just how easy it is to draw clear, atmospheric maps in a very short space of time.

I’ll be emulating some of my favourite styles, with the mind to develop my own style from the industry benchmark.

Tools

In the UK currently, it is very easy to get your hands on the tools you’ll need to draw out your own dungeon maps. Here’s a list of the pens and pencils I use, which I’ve selected for their inexpensive price tags:

  • Derwent hard pencils – a set of 5 pencils shouldn’t cost you an arm and a leg. There’s a huge variety out there, but frankly you can get away with a pretty standard HB, 2H and 2B set of pencils. HB is your standard pencil, 2H is a harder pencil which gives you a harder and lighter pencil line, whereas 2B is soft, giving you a darker and softer pen line.
  • I use Uni Pin fine liners for the inking of my maps – they’re pretty common and over the last ten years have dropped in price significantly. For my practice, I use different thickness of nibs: 0.5, 0.2 and 0.05 mm pens, with a brush pen for extra thick lines.
  • For practice, I bought a really cheap pad of 50 sheets of drawing pad paper, A4. If I’m sketching I got to town a purchase A5 sketchbooks, these shouldn’t cost you too much, but I like the thicker paper sheets.

All of these items are available at the Range – I was amazed that 10 fine liner pens were around £10 per pack, giving more pens than you will ever need! A4 drawing paper can cost as little as £1. Art pencils can cost a little more than regular pencils, but there’s no need to go crazy for your first time. A simple clean eraser is helpful.

So, here follows my method for quick, simple and effective dungeon maps.

Zero

To save on buying fancy pads of paper, I start by drawing the framework on a new piece of paper. Using the edges of the paper, I mark out inch wide dots to form a series of squares. You can create 1-cm lines if you want, but for the use of tabletop maps, I prefer 1-inch tiles. It’s a standard format, with 1-inch acting as a 5ft space for your players. My example is below. I’ll only really need to do this once, so its best to get it right and save the page for multiple uses in the future.

RPG Map Dungeon Cave Dungeons and Dragons DM

One

Once I’ve got this right, I can start using it to map out my err, map. I place the framework page underneath a fresh page and mark where the lines intersect with a cross. I’ll draw in the walls of the dungeon room, all in pencil. I’m going to just be using a simple square as the dungeon tile, normally you’d leave space for a door in and out, but my examples are just that, examples.

RPG Map Dungeon Cave Dungeons and Dragons DM

Two

The next bit is where it starts to get a little more tricky. My first step here is to draw the outlines of the room in a thicker pen. Here I used the 0.5mm pen, but sometimes I use a brush pen for an extra thick line. So long as the pen you use is the thickest pen for your dungeon map tile, you’ll get a good edge. It needs to be thicker to stand out as the walls of your room.

Next, I switch to the 0.2mm pen and draw the lines of the stonework – this is a simple process, but you should be aware that you don’t want to draw the tiles like a literal grid. For best effect, you want to give the impression of the stonework. I do this by lightly bouncing the pen up and down on the paper as I draw the lines, creating a staggered line. It looks smarter and more realistic than if they were a simple grid.

Using the really fine pen, the 0.05mm pen, I add in some cracks randomly to the stonework and add a few lines to the edges of the room. This is purely fanciful and down to your own preference!

RPG Map Dungeon Cave Dungeons and Dragons DM

Three & Four

In these images, I’ve tried to convey a bit of lighting. Dark and damp dungeons are not airy and light places, so it adds atmosphere – I added some shade or shadows. Shade and shadows can be used for different purposes here – they act as both an absence of light and potentially dirt or dust.

For tile 3 I used lines to suggest shadow, for tile 4 I used simple dots that grow in concentration the darker the shadow becomes.

I added some missing chunks of stonework, which I filled in with some hatching using the 0.05mm pen. You can see where I practised this at the side of the page. You can also add some tiny rocks and surround them with simple dots to create a messy appearance – you don’t need to explain what these are, they could be moss, fungus or just bits of stone or bone.

RPG Map Dungeon Cave Dungeons and Dragons DM

Five

Next, I draw a simple border around the room, about half a centimetre, which you can see in tile 5. You’ll notice that I’ve not drawn using a rule at all in my process – I like it to look natural and a bit rough… adds to the atmosphere!

RPG Map Dungeon Cave Dungeons and Dragons DM

Six

In tile 6 you can see the different border techniques that you can use to provide a bit of depth to your maps and also define what is solid rock and what is room space. These three techniques are used extensively across the internet. I’ve adapted mine from Dyson and Dark Realm Maps – both industry leaders and heavily involved in the RPG community – you should check them out on Twitter!

RPG Map Dungeon Cave Dungeons and Dragons DM

So, at the top of the tile, there is line hatching – this is just a series of lines running in the same direction, repeated and twisted to create a pleasing mess to the eye. To top it off, I just added some random singular lines, dots and small stones to give it a more natural feel. It takes quite a long time to do and easy to mess up – make sure your lines come to a stop with another oblique line for a nice finish.

On the right side of the tile is simple dotting – the closer to the wall you are the more dense the dots become. A simple method that doesn’t take too long to do, but keep in mind how many dots it takes to do a single centimetre square!

Finally on the bottom of the tile is “stone support.” You can use this method for underground dungeons or for free-standing buildings above ground. Each building block has its own shape and size but is organised in clear lines. I tend to keep some stones to the guidelines we drew in tile 5, whereas some go beyond it – I prefer to keep it even as a rule of averages: for every extra tall block, there should be a shorter block to match it.

And that is pretty much it!

I’ve included some of my own tiles which I first started a week or so ago. You can see where I’ve messed up in some places. Overall though, this method is actually quite quick and easy for a small to a medium-sized dungeon. You can keep your map to a single piece of paper or cut out your tiles to allow the players to only see them when they enter a new room.

I hope this has been informative, and we’d love to see some of your creations on our facebook page or tag us on twitter with @ FerrisWrites.

Next week I’ll go into more detail about cave dungeon maps and tiles, which can be a little more time consuming but require less initial setup.

Bye for now!

Ferris

Part 2 – Cave Maps can be found here.

Handling Creative Projects: Motivation, Content & Formatting

The Godless Realm was born whilst travelling at 70 mph on a dark, rainy motorway somewhere near Coventry. The Godless Realm is a fantasy world setting for tabletop role-playing (TTRPG, or just RPG). It’s not out yet, but we wanted to write about how we’re doing things to give you an insight in what is involved and maybe pick up a few tips along the way.

Since its initial inception we’ve fleshed out ideas, cut and pasted countless more ideas and edited so many documents and versions of documents that we’ve lost count – our Google Drive is a bit of a mess at the moment too. I started to ask myself, what needs to be done?

Here are a few points on what we’ve tried, failed and retried to give you an idea on how to keep a project going…

Share It

Doing a project by yourself is all fine if you’ve got the motivation and the skills to get a project done. But if you’re like most people, sharing your content with trusted friends really helps, especially if they into the same things as you are. We use Google Drive to share, make suggestions and comments and leave helpful little motivational “likes” here and there for bits we particularly enjoy.

creator consortium master page affinity development blog RPG roleplaying game DnD Fantasy Godless Realm

Motivation

One of the hardest things to maintain over a long project like this is keeping motivated and getting the task done. On a personal level, this is something I have to do after getting home from work or spending time with my partner (or for others, juggling a young family). So how do we do it?

Once a week, we meet up for coffee or food somewhere that isn’t our home. The reason for this is quite simple: we get out of the house, have an excuse to meet up and hang our mental washing out to dry. Coffee is great for thinking up ideas and energizing the imagination – and the meal is a great place to discuss ideas without having to dedicate your entire concentration. The key is that it’s a relaxing thing to do.

Since doing this we’ve found that our ideas flow more readily and feel natural without having to engage and force ideas.

Personally, I drive home from work and listen to thematic music to fit the nature of the project (anything from Lustmord to Lord of the Rings), get in, walk the vintage Labrador, eat food and sit down for an hour and write solely for that hour. If I find my attention failing, I spend 2 minutes on Twitter or Facebook, checking the stats and analytics of the various social media platforms, have a stand up stretch and get back to it.

Once that is done, the evening is my own to do with as I wish (which usually involves board games, doggo playtime or friends). Do this for five days a week, you’ve spent a minimum of 5 hours working solidly on your project.

A quality 5 hours too.

As a real example, we manage to proof or edit 10 pages of content. If we’re purely writing, you’re looking at 5 good pages a week – and this based on the assumption that it’s just me working! I’m lucky to have the imagination of Mr James and sometimes Mr Steadman working at the same time.

Proof & Edit

This isn’t something you can really do as you go along. If you’ve ever tried NaNoWriMo you’ll see that proofing and editing should be done at set stages or strictly at the end of the project. The reason for this is simple: you need to give you mind time to forget the details of what you’ve written. Do that and the text seems fresh – mistakes stand out like a whale at a cheetahs party.

Personally I find reading something out loud (or just whispering it to yourself) allows you to see when you need to pause to take in a comfortable breath. If you’re not sure on how something sounds, send it to a friend to look over (maybe just a snippet so they don’t lose focus), or get yourself a few books on writing in the language you’re using. Penguin books are good for this, and there’s a host on free online content with good ideas.

Mark in your document how far you’ve got and go back to it when you’re feeling too tired or bored – it’s perfectly fine to feel tired or bored, just give it time and go back to it again.

If you use Google Docs, you can make comments on your work as you go, leaving yourself little messages so that you don’t forget things. We also tag each other at the points where we feel the content is more in someone else’s domain, or if you need help with a section.

Take your time, and read the content for what it is, don’t just skim read it.

creator consortium master page affinity development blog RPG roleplaying game DnD Fantasy Godless Realm

Formulating Ideas

Ideas do not just come to a person in a complete form – you need to develop something into more refined or expanding ideas. For the Godless Realm project, this meant that we would start with something small in the form of questions:

“How do the Guilds pay their workforce?”

  • Workers are given a station which supplies their food, an abode and expected duties.
  • To gain more money, luxury or influence a worker must gain promotion to a better, hierarchical post, with more responsibility – but these are limited!
  • So who makes the food? Who manages the houses? Who lights the streets? Who cleans the streets? Are there sewers, who cleans them?

The list of extra questions  builds and goes on and on. You don’t have to answer all of them, but building up the picture gives you avenues to explore and ideas from which to build on. From this method we created various guilds, factions and gangs to fulfill the niches we felt needed filling, whilst making them important to the citizens of the Godless Realm.

Formatting

This should be your final step in any written project!

Formatting is where many of the issues can arise. What program do you use to help format your documents into something legible and professional looking? How professional do you want it to look? Where do you need to add spot-filler art or page breakers?

creator consortium master page affinity development blog RPG roleplaying game DnD Fantasy Godless Realm DriveThruRPG

We purchased some stock art from DriveThruRPG (it’s usually a few dollars / GBP for some sets) and grabbed a copy of Affinity Publisher – this was the most expensive part of the project so far, as Affinity costs £48 – but it’s a one-off payment… no subscription (looking at you, Microsoft!).

You can get free versions of publisher style programs such as Scribus, but I found them to be old and stuffy and not as user friendly or efficient with my computers CPU. Affinity also do video tutorials, which I found very easy to follow. That’s my endorsement for the week!

creator consortium master page affinity development blog RPG roleplaying game DnD Fantasy Godless Realm

With Affinity and some simple stock art I was able to start producing master pages and spreads which look reasonably professional quickly – less than an hour in fact.

I’ll say it again: At this stage, you need to have all of your project text finalised, with no changes, edits or additions or subtractions from the main body of text – because doing so once it is formatted is just undoing a lot of the work you’ve already done, i.e, wasting your own time!

That’s it for today – I hope this insight has been a little helpful or inspiring. The key conclusion I think is that if you think it’s impossible, it will be. Set yourself little goals and read around the subject and you’ll start to formulate your own patterns of working.

If you have any questions, leave a comment below or contact me on Twitter (@FerrisWrites) or Like our Facebook page!

Here’s a little free “bare bones” RPG adventure, feel free to try it out and let us know what you think… constructively…

Bare Bones Adventure 1

Ferris, CC

Credit: Some artwork copyright William McAusland, used with permission.

Creator Consortium’s Summer Project Update

For the last few months we’ve been working hard on many levels. With full time jobs and weekends away for creative role play events, it’s quite easy to forget where we’re up to and what we’re doing. August is the end of the LRP season and the summer is waning slowly to the darker hours of the winter – the perfect excuse to stay in and play games or write reviews without the guilt!

So, that said, it’s time to give an update! Here goes…

The CC Website

We’re hoping to be taking the website to a different level, stepping away from WordPress.com and switching to WordPress.org. We realise, now that we’ve played around a bit with various site settings, that wordpress.com is quite expensive, more so when you want some simple functions.

We’ve got some help in the form of friendly expertise and hopefully, in the next couple of months we’ll be switching sites and porting everything over. We’ll keep you in the loop when this is likely to happen and chances are we won’t be posting any content during that time.

You probably won’t notice any immediate changes, but there will be space to properly organise our articles and feed. Fingers crossed it all goes to plan without a hitch!

UNK_0015

Pulp RPG

We’ve not had chance to get much more written for our various Pulp RPG game systems, and as always, there’s bound to be some creative differences. Hopefully by the new year we’ll have something more concrete to present! We still have ideas for the chase across Panama to stop Zombie Hitler and his diabolical plans! And of course, our Fantasy game still needs a lot of work, along with Mr Steadman’s space combat pulp RPG (which we did play test a while back and we’re keen to see where it goes!)

The Godless Realm

We’ve been plugging away at the Godless Realm, CC’s (currently) system neutral fantasy setting. While we have the majority of the metropolis written and planned out, we’re now moving to the outer regions of the setting. If you use Twitter, @FerrisWrites has been posting teasers about the various aspects of the setting.

We’ve made some changes to the cosmology and fleshed out some of the unwritten context for the eyes of the GM only. This, we hope, will provide a lot more variation for future writing and give us writers a bit more juice when we’re dreaming up ideas!

9th Age warhammer fantasy battle Games Workshop WFB tabletop gaming wargame Fantasy

The 9th Age

We caught the eye of the 9th Age assembly and they liked our review! The 9th Age is a tabletop war game set in a pseudo-medieval fantasy setting. It mirrors very closely (and frankly performs better) than the old Warhammer Fantasy Battles (no longer in production) by Games Workshop.

We’d like to take a moment to thank them for all of their support, and look forward to seeing 2 out of 3 articles in their online magazine, the 9th Scroll. Part three of the trilogy will be ready when we’ve mustered up some players and miniatures and get some battles under our belts!

We’re also going to have a look at the 9th Age Army Builder site and app and compare it to BattleScribe to see which of the two we think is easier to use and provides the best output regarding army lists and details. We’ll do this in our part three article and run the battles with those outputs and see how seamless they are!

warhammer 40000 40k fantasy battlescribe army list army builder armylist armybuilder gamesworkshop games workshop

Upcoming Reviews

Cthulhu Mythos (5th ed) – Sandy Petersen has done it again with Cthulhu Mythos, a source book for 5th Edition Dungeons & Dragons… and it’s more than just a list of monster stats!

cthulhu-mythos-pfrpg-header.jpg

Low Fantasy Gaming by Pickpocket Press, a grim and gritty variant on mainstream Dungeons & Dragons, and possibly a better spiritual successor than 5th edition D&D? We shall see!

Screenshot 2019-08-04 at 12.16.26

Key Forge, made by the same guy who created Magic the Gathering only this is better than MtG, for your pocket and your blood pressure!

Screenshot 2019-08-04 at 12.18.20

Arcworlde, a skirmish game for 32mm miniatures in a fantasy setting! With rumours of a second edition, Alex Huntley is set to impress us yet again with his miniature line and games!

Screenshot 2019-08-04 at 12.20.48

All of this extra content should keep us going over the next few months!

Calling all Artists!

We’re getting to the point where we are hoping to start formatting our content for the Godless Realm fantasy role-play setting. Although we have the skills to manipulate some free media, we would really like to get some budding artists to donate sketches and doodles that could appear in the final PDF.

We’re still not there yet and we obviously need to get everything into one place, but in the distant future we’re considering kick-starting the Godless Realm to get professional editing, proofing and formatting. This means that if you’re able to donate some art, we may also be able to provide you with some financial rewards for artwork you’ve developed (if we successfully kick-start) – essentially, get in early and join us in this endeavour and perhaps we can create something amazing!

Of course, the written content will always be free in its raw form, we’re not taking that away from the world, but it would be great to have a print-to-order service from the likes of DriveThruRPG!

Fantasy RPG Pulp Adventure Hero Knight Cavalry D&D

New Friends!

Last but not least, we’re having a bit of fun with Summon Games, where we’re having a go at playing games for the first time under the scrutiny of YouTube viewers. It’s early days yet for Mr Dodd (@Doddymaster). You can find Summond Games YouTube channel here.

Stay tuned, and if there’s anything you want us to take a look or, or indeed join us as an affiliate Creator, get in touch!

You can find me @FerrisWrites for Twitter, or on our Facebook Page!

Bye for now!

Ferris, CC

Water Colour Brushes in GIMP – 10 Quick & Easy steps to make your photo images look amazing!

So we’ve had a little trouble lately with getting images for our first complete incarnation of Pulp Fantasy. It’s never easy doing something on a budget and entirely your own time. Our searches for willing artists have been hard, and for good reason – few people want to work and create something for free, credits or no credits. We understand that feeling precisely!

We stepped back and looked at what free resources we could muster to helps us create some images we could call our own (in part). This what we came up with…

GIMP

GIMP or the GNU Image Manipulation Program is a free image editor for just about every digital platform. Its so free in fact, you can edit its source code and distribute that new scripting for yourself if you were so inclined. You can download it from here, its a really cool tool. Yes, it may not have everything Photoshop does, but err, Photoshop is not free!

Pixabay

This cool site is used for media all over the internet. It is chock full of drawings, photographs and vector art. Admittedly, some of it is not up to an amazing standard, but then it’s also free. The vast majority of the images found on Pixabay are both free to use commercially and do not require attribution to the author / creator, meaning you can use it freely for personal or enterprise use. You can find Pixabay here, but make sure you check what the terms of use are, just in case!

Brush Sets

In GIMP and similar programs, you can find and download different tool effects. I’m going to focus on the brush tools, which, rather than just drawing one tiny pixel at a time, allow you to create varied shapes and effects with the click of your mouse button. The are thousands of brushes and special effects out there to use, but here’s a link to a few helpful brushes!

You’ll need to download these and save them in the right folder. To save us all time, there’s a handy little walk through here

Once you’re setup, we’re good to go!

This isn’t a complicated process but it’s worth getting it right. There’s room to play with various levels and tones, so take your time to play and learn what works best for you.

Step Zero

Search to find an image from Pixabay or one of your own and save it in a handy space. I tend to save images to my desktop for ease, I guess this is what its for? Later I’ll save it to a proper directory. Later, sure…

Step One

1

Start by opening your image in GIMP using the File > Open options. It should appear just like the image above.

Step Two

2

I’m going to work on black and white images, since my final document I want to have a brooding and dark feeling to it, not much room for colour. Artistic choices, eh? You can desaturate the image using Colour > Desaturate. There’s a choice of 3 levels, so play about and see which works best for you. It’s just a choice, and there’s not a huge amount of variety in it.

Step Three

3

I don’t want all of the detail to show in the images, as I like a slight abstract feel. So I use the Posterize option found using the Colours > Posterize. Again, you can fiddle for different effects.

You can also use the Threshold tool, following Colours > Threshold for more control. Posterize is quicker, but with Threshold you get more choice with the handy slider bar. Play around, see what you like!

Step Four

4

So, now we’re going to work with some Layers. Layers are literally just that, extra layers over or under your image which we use to create effects. Some of them can be invisible, others can be bold. Any image manipulation will involve layers, they’re essential parts to the GIMP and Photoshop process.

You can access a new layer following Layers > New Layer, or there’s a handy little button on the bottom left of the Layer Window.

You want to create a new layer that is Transparent. Then click on the paint pot symbol, which is the Filler tool. You can find it by following Tools > Paint Tools > Bucket Fill.

With the new layer highlighted, fill it with white (you can choose any colour but white works best here).

Now make sure that this new layer is below your original image. You can click and drag it down. If you’ve done this right, you can’t see the new layer, as your original image is now ‘over the top’ of the new layer.

5

Step Five

6

So click on your original layer image and then right click on it. This will bring up a new menu. We’re going to add a mask layer to the image. Select ‘Add Layer Mask…’ and choose ‘Black (Full Transparency)’ like the image below.

7

Your image should now vanish behind a white layer. Fear not, this is meant to happen! Now the fun bit begins!

Step Eight

Select the paint brush tool from the quick menu on the right or by following Tools > Paint Tools > Paintbrush. Increase the size of the brush to something that matches your image size, for me that was a size of over 600.

9

Now select the type of brush you want to use from the Brushes window (bottom left of the image above). If you’ve installed your brushes properly they should appear here. If they don’t, hit the refresh button or go over the tutorial earlier to check for errors.

When you’ve selected your brush size and shape, go ahead and click some brush marks on the blank screen. You should see the image start to appear underneath the mask.

The more times you click on the same portion of the image, the darker and more apparent it will appear.

The key to this part is really just seeing what works for you. Mix and match the different brush shapes. If you mess up, you can use the Undo shortcut Ctrl + Z which will take you back one step at a time.

8

Step Nine

Keep going until you’re happy with the result. Play around with the image and don’t rush the process. If you’re really not happy, just open the image again and start from fresh.

Finishing Up

Some images work better than others, it really depends on what effect you’re after. Once you’re happy with the final image, you should probably save it as a new file under the File > Save As, options.

Then you just need to Export the new image using File > Export. Give it a new flashy name and select the extension type. Ideally you’re after .jpeg or .png if you’re using the file in word documents or for websites (the files are pretty small but keep a good level of detail).

armour gear

We’ve used this process to create some images for our Fantasy Pulp tabletop RPG and the fantasy setting ‘The Godless Realm’ which you can learn about here:

The Godless Realm – Update and Changes Made

We’re also on Discord, and here’s the link to join us there!

That’s it for now!

J.D. Ferris

The Godless Realm – Update and Changes Made

We’ve been quiet on the social media and website front. We’re not lazy. We’ve been busy!

Four weeks ago I enlisted the help of an experienced RPG gamer and writer named Mr James, to bring some much needed energy and creativity. In that time we’ve packed a tonne of lore and story into the Godless Realm setting, making it meaty and plausible in equal measure.

Fantasy RPG Pulp Adventure Hero Knight Cavalry D&D
Edited Image, Originally by David MacKenzie from Deviant Art https://www.deviantart.com/jagged-eye/art/Lee-Warrior-4a-435067509

We’ve decided to make the Godless Realm system neutral, meaning it is chock full of lore content, with plenty of hooks and ideas to create your own adventures in whatever RPG system you desire. We still aim to release adventures and story arcs to fit into the Godless Realm, and we have planned several evolutions to the Godless Realm setting in the future as the world populates and widens.

The extra help from Mr James has given me time to rewrite the Pulp Core rules in two important ways; firstly it is streamlined and the probabilities now work properly. For a success, a dice roll now requires a single score of a 6. Secondly, we realised that the Core Pulp system has flaws and lost its direction. Based on the feedback we received, I’ve really hit the system hard and cut out irrelevant details and mechanics to tighten everything up. The development process, based on your feedback, has really helped us get this right. I am now much happier with the system and we’ve developed some interesting mechanics.

Pulp Fantasy, as it is currently called, comes in three documents which we are releasing to our reliable readers and testers soon. These will be a Player Guide, a Games Master Guide and a tome of Creatures & Inhabitants. We felt this would help keep the attention and excitement for players new to the gaming world, and keep some of the secrets for the GM.

mistings

The magic system has had a complete overhaul and now works in a fashion more inline with a ritualistic and narrative style. It is based on ritual preparations but also allows for desperate unprepared spell casting. We hope this makes it flexible and adaptive with countless possibilities for players and GM’s to create their own spells. We’re even encouraging the players to write down their spells as they think of and use them, essentially creating a tome of personal spells which will help them improve with character advancement. Best not lose that spell book, eh?

Bad Guys

Monsters have been a bit of a bugbear but we’ve settled on some nice ideas to break the mold of typical gaming habits. The biggest change we’ve implemented is the size and actions of larger creatures.

Larger monsters, though rare, will not act at a single point in the combat process each turn. Instead they will be able to act as several individuals, making special attacks based on the number of limbs and special abilities they posses. Now, a player will have to think twice about charging forward to get stuck in, because that Dragon hasn’t blown all its actions targeting the warriors in the party just yet, so getting too close is still dangerous. Players will have to think about their actions and weigh the chances of getting too close too soon.

femaleknight

Artwork Desires

On a little side project, we’ve been seeking artwork to help bring the world and documents to life and poke some imagination back into our minds. This has been difficult. We are not in a situation yet where we can pay artists to bring our world to life, so instead we’ve been relying on stock images and editing what we can get our hands on.

We’re working hard to make sure that the images we use are properly credited – we’re the Creator Consortium, we want people to be recognised for their hard work.

One problem we have encountered is the over sexualisation of female adventuring style stock photos. While this may prove titillating to some, it isn’t very inclusive. Since we’re looking for more realistic fantasy stock images, we may have to dig deeper to find something less bosom-heaving for something like more gritty realism. Watch this space!

We’re focusing on a process which will allow us to take any stock images and create some cohesion to make it less jarring to look at. Hopefully some nice black and white water colour effects will help the mystery blossom too. There’s a couple of examples dotted throughout this article, and we’re accepting criticism if you can show us a few tricks!

But we realise that people may want to print our documents at some point, so we’re going to be supplying some print easy options too. No one likes to spend a fortune on inks!

There’ll be a blog post this week to show how we’ve been editing our chosen stock images and I’ll go into detail about how to credit and reference people correctly for their hard work! It’s been a fun learning curve.

Until then…

Thanks for reading, I’ll be back with another update soon.

Mr Ferris

Here’s how we made our images!

Fantasy RPG Pulp Adventure Hero Knight Cavalry D&D

An Intro To The Pulp RPG Modular Framework.

An Intro To The Pulp RPG Modular Framework.

The Future Of Pulp RPG And You.

Dev Blog: Pulp Play-Test, Feedback, Zombies & Editing

Game Design: An Exercise In Friendship.

Hello, all.

Fozzy here from creator consortium. I’m aiming to bring you an article on games design, or rather, the summation of my experience at designing our in-house tabletop role playing game; Pulp RPG.

It started some months ago, between Ferris and I. We’re prone to flights of fancy, in fact it has been the defining feature of our friendship as far as I am concerned, and something I am very glad of. There is nobody else in the world who I can pool my enthusiasm with like I can with Mr Ferris. We’ve both designed systems before, many on the back of napkins, so to speak, some make it a little further. I know he developed a very nice little system he plans to convert to Pulp later down the line, but I digress.

We’ve never gotten this far before. We have a tangible, working system that feels as if it lives and breathes before our eyes. It stands apart from us now, as its own entity; maybe rough around the edges, it’s face will change over the years, but it’s exciting and I think I know why.

The reason we were able to get this far is because we were able to harness those long conversations, temper the streams of consciousness into a honed blade. You spend so long talking about something that it no longer makes sense, and many times this was the case with our game. Yet every time that happened, we resolved to take a step back and pluck from the haystack those needles of brilliance (in our eyes) that allowed us to produce something we both see as worthy now, we established rules and clear goals at the start of the process and never deviated from their mandate.

The lessons taught were simple: to let your mind run away with possibility, but to always slash away at those ideas until the good ones emerge. To be hard on yourself as well as each other, to never compromise on something you feel is right, but never try to compromise the other in what they think is right.

The above sounds like an exercise in futility, but we did it. I feel it is a testament to the kind of friendship we have and the kind of honesty we share with each other that has helped us to go further with a project than we ever have before. It’s also the reason why we’re going to succeed in bringing our game to people’s tables. It almost feels inevitable.

And so I write, and he writes;  sometimes completely separately from the other, because we know what is expected. Because we worked hard to trim and to smash away the marble to build a streamlined core that can always be referenced, that we built, and it feels good.

As we go forward with our myriad projects, I think that is the main idea we want to keep front and centre: that every move forward must look back on who we are, to remember what is to be achieved by our partnership and whether each step works towards the principals you set out at the start. And to have fun with the creative process, and to make some of that fun being harsh when it comes to editing.

I enjoy writing more rambling articles. I feel like I put too much pressure on “having something to write about”, when I enjoy writing so much more when I find that something when I’m writing it, so expect more of these from me.

Happy gaming,
Fozzy.

An Intro To The Pulp RPG Modular Framework.

Hello nerdy people!

We’re here today to tell you about a pretty big side of what Pulp RPG is all about: The Modular Framework. Now what on earth is that?

Well, it’s the central idea upon which all of the development of Pulp RPG revolves. To put it simply, The Modular Framework takes the Pulp RPG Basic Rulebook and uses it’s simple mechanics as a point from which to build more complex and setting-specific game systems, without having to include all of these rules in one giant tome.

While indeed you can just use the Basic Rulebook’s lightweight and narratively focused ruleset to run any sort of game you like, in any sort of setting you like, we feel that those more crunchy, mechanics-based systems are a lot of fun too, so we’ll be using The Modular Framework to add layers and layers of mechanical complexity to the game going forward.

The trick we’re really trying to achieve is being able to use tiers of complexity to allow you to flesh out your games in any way you want. This approach will also allow us to deliver packs of new content and mechanics as and when they are developed, so that you can slot them into your games to make the experience new and refreshing even after hundreds of hours invested into playing Pulp RPG.

Mechanics packs will be included alongside Setting packs for things like Sci-Fi combat, Spaceship Battles and Hacking in the Pulp StarFight Setting Pack being developed right now.

We think this approach will allow both us and you as players to have our cake and eat it, by being able to get your teeth into oodles of new and interesting rules and tables, while still rooting the system in simplicity.

We certainly hope you agree! But we’d love to hear any feedback you have by either commenting down below or joining our Discord server. There’s usually someone there enthusiastic to answer any questions.

Link to Discord: https://discord.gg/PGj8yYS

That’s all from us for now, but be sure to check back soon for a new update!

 

Happy gaming,
The Creator Consortium Crew.