Category Archives: Dev Blogs

Game Design: An Exercise In Friendship.

Hello, all.

Fozzy here from creator consortium. I’m aiming to bring you an article on games design, or rather, the summation of my experience at designing our in-house tabletop role playing game; Pulp RPG.

It started some months ago, between Ferris and I. We’re prone to flights of fancy, in fact it has been the defining feature of our friendship as far as I am concerned, and something I am very glad of. There is nobody else in the world who I can pool my enthusiasm with like I can with Mr Ferris. We’ve both designed systems before, many on the back of napkins, so to speak, some make it a little further. I know he developed a very nice little system he plans to convert to Pulp later down the line, but I digress.

We’ve never gotten this far before. We have a tangible, working system that feels as if it lives and breathes before our eyes. It stands apart from us now, as its own entity; maybe rough around the edges, it’s face will change over the years, but it’s exciting and I think I know why.

The reason we were able to get this far is because we were able to harness those long conversations, temper the streams of consciousness into a honed blade. You spend so long talking about something that it no longer makes sense, and many times this was the case with our game. Yet every time that happened, we resolved to take a step back and pluck from the haystack those needles of brilliance (in our eyes) that allowed us to produce something we both see as worthy now, we established rules and clear goals at the start of the process and never deviated from their mandate.

The lessons taught were simple: to let your mind run away with possibility, but to always slash away at those ideas until the good ones emerge. To be hard on yourself as well as each other, to never compromise on something you feel is right, but never try to compromise the other in what they think is right.

The above sounds like an exercise in futility, but we did it. I feel it is a testament to the kind of friendship we have and the kind of honesty we share with each other that has helped us to go further with a project than we ever have before. It’s also the reason why we’re going to succeed in bringing our game to people’s tables. It almost feels inevitable.

And so I write, and he writes;  sometimes completely separately from the other, because we know what is expected. Because we worked hard to trim and to smash away the marble to build a streamlined core that can always be referenced, that we built, and it feels good.

As we go forward with our myriad projects, I think that is the main idea we want to keep front and centre: that every move forward must look back on who we are, to remember what is to be achieved by our partnership and whether each step works towards the principals you set out at the start. And to have fun with the creative process, and to make some of that fun being harsh when it comes to editing.

I enjoy writing more rambling articles. I feel like I put too much pressure on “having something to write about”, when I enjoy writing so much more when I find that something when I’m writing it, so expect more of these from me.

Happy gaming,
Fozzy.

“Talking Pulp” – A whole new world for Pulp RPG

This week we got together and have somehow managed to record the next in our series of development logs for Pulp RPG. We talk about what it means to run a game of Pulp and why we think this tabletop RPG system will really bring something fresh to your gaming table.

We’re recording these sessions because we really want you to feel involved in the development of our game, as is reflected in the involved style of the rules where the GM and players justify their actions and go back and forth to realise the outcome. We give an example of this later on in the podcast, showcasing our penchant for on the fly roleplay.

So there it is, download and enjoy!

Download Link

If you do want to be involved, join the discord community:

https://discord.gg/PGj8yYS

Or, read up on the last few exciting weeks of development:

The Future Of Pulp RPG And You.

The devs play the first ever session of CC’s new game: Pulp RPG

Dev Blog: Pulp Play-Test, Feedback, Zombies & Editing

It’s been a tough couple of weeks here at CC.

We have NaNoWriMo underway (John tells me he’s smashing his word count) which is taking up some of our time, but despite this we’ve managed to get some play-testing underway for Pulp RPG’s first adventure module!

In the meantime I’ve been undertaking the proofing, editing and adding to the core rule-set or Pulp. I’m happy to say that we’re going to release a file with everything you need to run your own Pulp games with less than 20 pages!

Sounds small – but I think that if you condense much of the 5th Edition Players Handbook you’d probably get about the same – except that our character creation is so easy and swift you’ll be done in a matter of minutes.

For the next play test there’s a list of things we’re hoping to iron out…

  • Currently there’s information on vehicles, weapons and objects that we’re working on and we’re certain that they will fit seamlessly into the narrative style game play of Pulp.
  • We’re working on some simple player crib sheets for character creation and guides on how to play the game.
  • Maps, handouts (including a mission slide presentation) are all on the list for things we’ll be working on soon. There’s even a chance of in-character dossiers and mission briefings, all for free of course (don’t worry, they won’t self destruct!)

In the meantime, once we have the PDF sorted out, we’ll be posting information for anyone wishing to help us out by play testing with us – if you want to be one of the first to have access to the raw core file, let us know and we’ll start a list. Alternatively join our mailing list and we’ll keep you updated.

Finally, we’ll be looking for artwork over the next few weeks which we think can really bring Pulp RPG to life – if you’re not bad at this sort of thing and reckon you could supply a handful of page fillers, get in touch so we can discuss the idea further.

Don’t forget we have our discord server up and running, which we hope will give you all a chance to discuss ideas, feedback on play tests and generally have a great time getting eager!

We also have a portion of our website set aside which will soon hold our game files for unlimited access – we’ll let you know when we start to populate it!

Anyone else notice the zombies teeth don’t line up with the rest of its mouth?

J.D Ferris, CC

Pulp RPG Leaves Pre-Alpha.

Over the last few weeks, we here at CreatorConsortium have been hard at work developing our Tabletop Roleplaying Game, dubbed Pulp RPG. This process has been a ton of fun for everyone here as we’ve really had the time and opportunity to nail down what we want to achieve with the game, so it’s with pride that we announce that Pulp has left the Pre-Alpha stage within one month of it’s inception.

We’ve always loved RPGs and regularly run and participate in many and varied games. Pulp RPG is the culmination of both the experience we feel we’ve gained in analysing what makes these kinds of games fun, but also our frustrations with what we see as bloated, monolithic systems that lack dynamism and the scope to let the players along with the GM focus on the roleplay, and indeed let it flow organically into the mechanics and vice versa.

This is why we have created Pulp RPG. Our first play test happened recently and really energised the whole development process, as we saw first hand how fun and different Pulp felt. We are so happy with how we’ve really nailed down the features we wanted while allowing ourselves plenty of room to grow and adapt to any player or GM with our modular development model.

You see, pulp isn’t just one system, it’s a simple, simple scaffolding that allows you to be able to build any story you want inside a genuinely fun, crunchy system which will grow with you. We have a huge opportunity to build intricate settings that span centuries, all connected by modules and eras, otherwise known as Content Packs, every one of which will be bursting with all the tools and rules you need to set up a fully fledged Pulp RPG game in any setting.

The last thing we must stress is just how easy Pulp is to play. You only need one six-sided die, the Free rules, one A4 sheet of paper and a pencil. We believe that we’re going to be the easiest Tabletop RPG to go from never knowing the game to rolling some dice and swinging a sword, while of course cursing the fickle hand of fate.

I hope you’ll join us in raising a glass on this, the first in many milestones!

If you are interested in following the development, be sure to check out the very first Devlog Podcast, where creators J.D.Ferris and J.A.Steadman dissect the first play test:

THE DEVS PLAY THE FIRST EVER SESSION OF CC’S NEW GAME: PULP RPG.

Or you can keep in touch with us directly on the discord. We’re a new site, which means people who connect with us early on will have a direct line to all the latest news and insight on our projects(and maybe get a copy of the pre-alpha rules, if you nag us.):

CreatorConsortium Discord.

The devs play the first ever session of CC’s new game: Pulp RPG

Today’s undertaking saw the completion of our first ever session in what we hope to be many more in the development of our game, Pulp RPG. It saw us chasing shadows and half rumours through the countryside of Panama, attacked by unholy creatures and confronting Hitler himself.

Brew you darkest French Roast and have a listen to the aftermath as Fozzy and Ferris excitedly ramble about what this means for role-playing games.

Download Link (25MB)

 

The Name’s Fiction, Pulp Fiction – why we owe cheap fiction of the past a debt for the glorious genres we love today

Say ‘Pulp Fiction’ and most people think of Tarantino’s 1994 cult movie – the violence, the disgust, the horror of it all. Little will they know however of it’s working title; Black Mask, or what that even means. I’ll tell you what it means, but first let’s look more at what the true pulp fiction was.

According to dictionary.com the definition of pulp fiction is:

“Fiction dealing with lurid or sensational subjects, often printed on rough, low-quality paper manufactured from wood pulp.”

Pretty simple really, no set genre, not set style just cheaper printing and sensational content. But there is a history here and it’s quite cool – younger generations will have no idea what it was all about. Until now.

The pulps as they were also known as were counter to the slicks, glossy well made magazines for richer audiences. Despite the Americanisms, pulp fictions claim descendants from earlier styles and formats of literature; the penny dreadfuls of Britain and dime novels of the US. From these simple fiction papers came some powerful genres; those of us who love horror, fantasy and science fiction owe a lot to the pulp literature of the past – before the rise of those genres we only had pulps. And what a legacy to share.

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Despite their massive popularity of the time, it was never easy for early authors to become accepted writers; some famous authors of fantasy, such as Robert E. Howard never truly made it big in their lifetime, posthumous success becoming more common. Even Lovecraft, who spawned an entire sub-genre of cosmic horror by himself only managed to gather a few dollars for much of his extensive work, which are now more popular than ever across all forms of media from literature, film and game platforms of all kinds.

Indeed, many famous authors began or boosted their careers with pulp fiction stories: Isaac Asimov, Agatha Christie, Rudyard Kipling, Mark Twain even H.G Wells, the father of science fiction.

Pulp fiction covered everything from gritty westerns, dark crime thrillers, exotic fantasy and exceptional science fiction; all of which fell under weird fiction or some sort or other. But these weird tales grew into genres of their own, providing us with film noir and sword & sorcery, among others.

It wasn’t all great though. Often pulp magazines portrayed highly sexualised women in peril, a dashing hero nearby to risk his life in an attempt to rescue such a damsel – I’m not sure that sort of cover art would stand up in modern times, with good reason given the rise of equality since the 1950’s and the sexual liberation of women in the 60’s.

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Yesterday’s Sunrise

The rise of pulp fiction and its earlier descendants came primarily from financial reasons: the price. Quite simply, it was affordable fiction in a time before the internet, computers and films. It was your only escape that wasn’t the theatre, alcohol or underage pregnancy. You may be forgiven for wondering why the appeal seems to be lost in modern times.

Yet, at the height of pulp fiction there were millions of copies printed monthly, with some publishers boasting more than 300 pulp titles at a time, some from as early as the 1920s. The market truly was booming. The sensation didn’t stop in the US; the UK had its own share of pulp fiction, appealing to the young and the poor. You didn’t talk about which celebrity was fumbling their way through a dance-off, you talked about the characters and the situations of the latest pulp fiction. You probably had more in depth conversations about it too.

The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Galaxy, IF Worlds of Science Fiction, and Unknown were all leading the market in Britain, spanning decades (with artwork a little less sexualised, although still present).

Inevitable Fall

It was not to last however. In Britain and most of Europe, the succession of two world wars left a shortage of paper material, forcing publishers to reduce the size of their prints and limit their publications to several times a year. What was monthly was now quarterly and this had a knock-on effect for the industry, which we are still suffering from now: it is hard for new writers to be read.

Not being noticed forced some authors into writing novels instead and a reduction in sales meant that publishing houses had to be picky about who they took on and what they published. Prime content became everything. It all started to feel very ‘safe’ and perhaps stale.

The effect is still felt somewhat today in that it is still incredibly hard to become a published author and make a living from it. Sure, as a consumer the content we have is better but the ideas are not as fresh, daring or fringe-worthy. And lets only mention briefly that now everything comes in the form of a trilogy of trilogies. Finding a single story novella is pretty hard in the bookshops of today!

Even self publishing is hard, at least to make your goal financially viable.

Gone is the golden age of the pulp writer.

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Dost the Embers Stir?

Let’s be clear and honest though; reading a short story is fun! It doesn’t take an age, it is valuable time with oneself and is usually cheap – no huge investment. You can buy a small novella for less than £5 and that’s all you need – no TV or monitor, no subscription to Netflix or Amazon, nothing electrical at all (unless you’re reading at night).

But perhaps the best news of all is that there’s still hope. Hope that with the rise of online pulp houses like ThePulp.net and New Pulp Press who sell e-fiction for as little as $3-$6, there’s still a place to hide away from the world and live the life of your favourite (anti) heroes.

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So back to Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction; the working title, Black Mask was a US pulp magazine in the 1920s covering dark, gritty and corrupt crime stories. There was plenty of gore, violence and sex to fuel the 1994 movie, summing up the Tarantino’s tastes nicely.

So we’re going to have a go at bringing you some pulp fiction of our own, with a blog to run alongside it with our notes, plans and sketches to give you an idea of how much shit we put ourselves through! (I may have had a drink or two of Port).

Competitive Actions & combat, how we see it rolling out for CC’s Pulp RPG

So, you’re rolling dice pools to hack your way through door locking systems or swinging through trees on ropes to escape cannibalistic war-bands. You come to a stop, realising that you’re surrounded on four sides and it’s time for you and your friends to face the enemy in an extreme gun fight…

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How does it work?

Pulp RPG is about normal people in extraordinary situations, fighting to survive or rid the world of evil! But there’s danger in the hills and the forests are alive with terrors. You’ll hope you want to go first!

Today we’re going to look at combat, focusing on competitive rolling and the initiative sequence.

Initiative works differently from what most players may be used to; the players party and the games master each select a character from their sides of the combat. That character / non-player will then choose which attribute they want to base their initiative roll on. This is important because the character that wins the initiative roll will only be able to commit to a skill of that attribute.

We think it works because seizing the initiative is not always about how fast a person can move, like in some dexterity / celerity initiative systems. It could be as simple as pulling a trigger, outwitting an opponent or just being damn lucky. Since all starting characters will have a single attribute at 4 dice, it means that no one will be selected repeatedly for their high dice pool – it will come down to what action they wish to take.

When the winner of initiative is determined, the winning player goes first. After this point, the initiative is handed back and forth between each side of the combat until the last character or non-player has taken their turn.

It’s a little less natural but it allows for a little bit of planning without spending precious minutes deciding what combo of abilities the party wants to use, and since the roll is performed each round, it essentially stops initiative being one sided.

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How do we roll competitively?

It’s as simple of rolling your dice pool and counting the successes compared to that of your opponent. Using your physical attribute with your close combat skills? Simply declare your action, roll your dice pool and compare the results to that of the opponent’s dice pool. If the result is an equal number of successes then the combat is a stalemate, if you beat their number of successes you score the hit, maybe with added bonuses.

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OK, lets bloody some noses!

Damage will vary depending on what your weapon of choice is. Currently every weapon in the game will come as a standard unit with applied tags. Tags can add to the damage of the weapon depending on the target, add bonuses to abilities and provide role-play opportunities. A great example is the whip, in the hands of our protagonist, Tom Raider Jones:

Whip – Hand Weapon (tags: prehensile, slashing).

Not great against a single Nazi zombie:

Creature – Humanoid (tags: zombie, military training, well equipped, Will of the Fuhrer, Inexorable.)

That about sums up our little sojourn into the combat of Pulp RPG, tomorrow we’ll be looking at a couple of things from the games master point of view, looking at the categories and tags of players and monsters, with a little more depth to the weapon tags and damage in Pulp RPG.

J.D Ferris